Imagens das páginas
PDF
ePub

The work before us is worthy of her the Lives of Charles Lee, Joseph Reed and reputation. It coutains a very artistic com- Nathaniel Greene, men who fought and mentary on the career of Adelaide Kem toiled side by side with Washington, in ble; a beautiful tribute to the memory of the great cause of human freedom. onr own Allston; a noble essay on Woman's Generals Reed and Greene were alike Mission, and several other characteristic characterised by their ardent patriotism papers. The publishers have issued the and indomitable perseverance. They both first number of Heath's Heroines of Shake rendered such valuable services to their spear—a series of exquisite heads, with country as justly to entitle them to its lastthe “ Characteristics of Women," as the ing gratitude, and upon that account, if no text;-an enterprise that cannot fail to other, the minutest details of their lives succeed.

will be read with interest; but the events

of the period in which they were so actively Dolores. A Novel. By HARRO HARRING. engaged, are so striking, that the slightest 1 volume, in 4 parts. Marrenner, Lock- incident which tends to throw light upon wood & Co., New-York.

their character and motives, cannot be re

garded as unimportant. The earlier scenes of this romance take The life of Nathaniel Greene, written by place at Buenos Ayres, and the materials his grandson, is prefaced with a comfor the story are supplied chiefly by the plaint, which under the circumstances, we sufferings, real or supposed, of the Unita- can easily excuse, that during the lapse of rians, under the so called “ tyrannous" sur; sixty years, the only tributes paid to the veillance of Rosas, the governor, “aided memory of the former by the general by the Jesuits," and from that spirit of government, are one inedal, two pieces of reaction which followed his perhaps neces cannon, and the vote of a monument which sary severity, and, denouncing his power, has never been erected. We cannot recalled imperatively for the union of the ciprocate the author's opinion that repubSouth American provinces into the form lics are ungrateful.-Circumstances will of a republic. The heroine (Dolores) is a occasionally arise to prevent even the most poetess and a patriot, whose impassioned liberal governments from giving to all the verses are so distasteful to the government, honors which are due them, but such men and so well calcnlated to inflame the pas as Greene, Read and Lee, will live in the sions of the disaffected, that she is particu- hearts of a free people, and build there the larly careful to conceai her name. She monumentum aere perennius, which is the writes some “Unitarian elegies,". which brightest hope of the patriotic and heroic attract the attention of the authorities, and defender of his country. These lives, though excite their curiosity and desire of ven written by different anthors, are all re. geance to such a pitch, that Signor Alphon- markable for a clear and earnest simplicity 80 (her lover) is arrested on the mere sus

of style and minuteness of research, which picion of being acquainted with her name,

serve greatly to enhance their value. and sentenced to a cruel death, for refusing to give her up to the dreadful punishments Lord Brougham's " Lives of Men of Letwhich await her. Some interesting scenes

ters and Science, who flourished in the occar in the prison where he is confined,

time of George Ill." Second series. particularly that in which the beauteous

Carey & Hart, Philadelphia. heroine enters in disguise to take a last farewell of her lover. He had exacted, as

So much has been said and written with the sole condition of allowing her to see respect to Lord Brougham and his works, him once more, a solemn promise that she that it only remains for us to direct attenwould relinquish all idea of acknowledg. tion to his lives of Dr. Johnson, Adam ing berself to be the authoress. Her reli. Smith, Lavoisier, Gibbon, Sir Joseph gious belief, indomitable patriotism, and Banks, and D'Alembert, contained in the eleration of mind, involve her in difficulties volume now before us, to confirm the and adventures which, together with a free high opinion which all who have read his disquisition upon the political movements previous

" Lives" must have formed in South America some thirty years since, d'avance of his treatment of these eminent are the medium through which are con

suhjects. veyed the animus and aim of this work. In his life of Dr. Johnson, we find little, We have mentioned the foregoing circum- if any matter of fact that is not already stances as they may be justly considered well known to the reading community; but a fair indication of the contents of the his deductions are invaluable, and his terse, volume.

perspicuous, and pregnant style gives a norelty to incidents which had long ceased to

interest us. These he has on various occaSparks' American Biography. Little & sions very happily introduced to illustrate Brown, Boston.

his views; and we conclude the reading of We have received the 8th and 10th vol. this biography with the impression that we umes of this extensive work, containivg have been gazing upon a minute and per

by increasing human happiness, must look pation. In many of the theories and specudeeply into the heart of man; examine lations of Mr. Headley, we find it impossiwith jealous care the artificial influences ble to follow him. As a guide to reflec. by which he is surrounded, and well ap- tion we hesitate often to commit ourselves preciate the lofty purposes of his creation. to his suggestions; but as a painter and Such writers are alone capable of defining delineator of events and scenery we canand illustrating the real duties and essen not but award him high praise. tial observances of modern and refined social life. They alone are worthy the Coffee, Tea, and Chocolate; their influglorious object of demonstrating to the ence upon the health, intellect, and the world, that true happiness and distinction moral nature of man. lie in the reconciliation of will and duty, This is the title of a small volume transand in the indulgence of those lofty and lated from the French of A. St. Arroman, delicate traits of sentiment and character and published by Towsend Ward, of Phil. which should be regarded as the true tests adelphia. The writer quotes the opinions of a more refined civilization. Mrs. Ellis of several distinguished medical practihas nobly enrolled and distinguished her. tioners upon the subject. Many of their self in this cause, and has produced seve views are doubtless erroneous, and conral works which exercise a most salutary trary to those entertained by the majority and agreable influence. The charming of experienced tea and coffee drinkers. volume before us is another step in the But the opinion of Dr. Begin, with respect useful course she has pursued. Both tem to the nature of tea, is so just and will be per and temperament are so varied by

80 generally recognised, that we cannot worldly circumstances, considerations of refrain from giving the substance of it. health, education, and a thousand unknown He says that it facilitates digestion, excites causes, as to present a never-ending theme perspiration, and has been used for the for speculation. The practical object of cure of rheumatism and many diseases of the above work is, however, to slow the the skin. Mr. Percival, another writer reabsolute necessity of making ourselves ferred to, recommends it as calming nervacquainted with every phase of the cha ous affections; whilst Monsieur Lemery racter of those with whom we come most awards it the still higher praise of aug. in contact, or who exercise the greatest menting the mental powers, giviug activity power over our destinies. The fair au

and development to thought, and producthoress gives a very interesting disquisition ing hilarity and contentment. Those, how. on temper and temperament, as relatively ever, who are desirous of reading the considered, and supplies two of the most ablest and most interesting dissertation we touching stories or sketches we have read have yet seen on this delightful and salufor some time. These are entitled the tary beverage, should read the pamphlet “ Managing Wife,” and “ the Imprisoned published some few months since by the Mind," and serve most aptly to illustrate Pekin Tea Company, New-York, wherein her theory

its various medicinal and moral properties

are arrayed with a clearness and force Napoleon and his Marshals. By J. T. which carry conviction with them.

Headley. Vol. 2.1. New-York : Baker & Scribner. 1846.

Memoirs and Essays on Arts, Literature, We have canvassed at some length in

and Social Morals. By Mrs. JAMESON.

New-York : Wiley & Putnam, 1846. previous numbers Mr. Headley's merits and defects as a writer, and the present We are happy to see Mrs. Jameson's volume confirins the opinions we then ad name on the title-page of a new volume. vanced. It would be difficult to find a Her books are always suggestive, and pos. subject better adapted to the author's sess that happy mixture of enthusiasm and powers. His forte is description - both discrimination which forms the most descenic and adventurous-especially the lightful critices on literature and art and latter. The idea was a happy one to life. Her Diary of an Enpuyée-hackney. group together the lives of the remarkable ed as is the scene of the book-abounds men who were so instrumental iu carrying with freshness and originality. Her "Loves out the designs of Napoleon. It was a of the Poets" is a delightful compilationmarked trait of the emperor-no small the very romance of biography." Characelement of his success—ihat he was gifted teristics of Women" is, however, the work with rare sagacity in the choice of his offi- upon which her fame rests. It coutains cers. Various in character as his marshals

more thought than any other work from were, they were all endowed with bril a female pen of modern times. The intel. liant qualities; and Mr. Headley has given lect of Mrs. Jameson is decidedly mascuus vivid daguerreotypes of their exploits, line, but the spirit in which she writes is such as present their battles and Alpine full of that delicate sympathy and chastenmarches with dramatic effect to the imagi- ed ardor so uative to a woinan's genius.

The work before us is worthy of her the Lives of Charles Lee, Joseph Reed and reputation. It coutains a very artistic com- Nathaniel Greene, men who fought and mentary on the career of Adelaide Kem- toiled side by side with Washivgton, in ble; a beautiful tribute to the memory of the great cause of human freedom. onr own Allston; a noble essay on Woman's Generals Reed and Greere were alike Mission, and several other characteristic characterised by their ardent patriotism papers. The publishers have issued the and indomitable perseverance. They both first number of Heath's Heroines of Shake, rendered such valuable services to their spear-a series of exquisite heads, with country as justly to entitle them to its lastthe “Characteristics of Women," as the ing gratitude, and upon that account, if no text;-au enterprise that cannot fail to other, the minutest details of their lives succeed.

will be read with interest; but the events

of the period in which they were so actively Dolores. A Novel. By Harro Harring. engaged, are so striking, that the slightest 1 volume, in 4 parts. Marrenner, Lock: incident which tends to throw light upon

their character and motives, cannot be rewood & Co., New-York.

garded as unimportant. The earlier scenes of this romance take

The life of Nathaniel Greene, written by place at Buenos Ayres, and the materials his grandson, is prefaced with a comfor the story are supplied chiefly by the plaint, which under the circumstances, we sufferings, real or supposed, of the Unita

can easily excuse, that during the lapse of rians, under the so called “ tyrannous” sur, sixty years, the only tributes paid to the reillance of Rosas, the governor, “aided memory of the former by the general by the Jesuits," and from that spirit of government, are one inedal, two pieces of reaction which followed his perhaps neces cannon, and the vote of a monument which sary severity, and, denouncing his power, has never been erected. We cannot recalled imperatively for the union of the ciprocate the author's opinion that repubSouth American provinces into the form lies are upgrateful.--Circumstances will of a republic. The heroine (Dolores) is a occasionally arise to prevent even the most poetess and a patriot, whose impassioned liberal governments from giving to all the verses are so distasteful to the government, honors which are due them, but such men and so well calculated to inflame the pas- as Greene, Read and Lee, will live in the sions of the disaffected, that she is particu- hearts of a free people, and build there the larly careful to conceai her name. She

monumentum aere perennius, which is the writes some “ Unitarian elegies,” which brightest hope of the patriotic and heroic attract the attention of the authorities, and defender of his country. These lives, though excite their curiosity and desire of ven written by different authors, are all re. geance to such a pitch, that Signor llphon- markable for a clear and earnest simplicity so (her lover) is arrested on the mere sus

of style and minuteness of research, which picion of being acquainted with her name,

serve greatly to enhance their value. and sentenced to a cruel death, for refusing to give her up to the dreadful punishments Lord Brougham's Lives of Men of Letwhich await her. Some interesting scenes

ters and Science, who flourished in the occur in the prison where he is confined,

time of George Ill." Second series. particularly ihat in wbich the beauteous

Carey & Hart, Philadelphia. heroine enters in disguise to take a last farewell of her lover. He had exacted, as

So much has been said and written with the sole condition of allowing her to see respect to Lord Brougham and his works, him once more, a solemn promise that she that it only remains for us to direct attenwould relinquish all idea of acknowledg. tion to his lives of Dr. Johnson, Adam jag herself to be the authoress. Her reli. Smith, Lavoisier, Gibbon, Sir Joseph gious belief, indomitable patriotism, and Banks, and D'Alembert, contained in the eleration of mind, involve her in difficulties volume now before us, to confirm the and adventures which, together with a free high opinion which all who have read his disquisition upon the political movements previous " Lives" must have formed in South America some thirty years since, d'avance of his treatmeut of these eminent are the medium through which are con- subjects. veyed the animus and aim of this work. In his life of Dr. Johnson, we find liule, We have mentioned the foregoing circum- if any matter of fact that is not already stances as they may be justly considered well known to the reading community; but a fair indication of the contents of the his deductions are invaluable, and his terse, volume.

perspicuous, and pregnant style gives a norelty to incidents which had long ceased to

interest us. These he has on various occaSparks' American Biography. Little & sions very happily introduced to illustrate Brown, Boston.

his views; and we conclude the reading of We have received the 8th and 10th vol- this biography with the impression that we umes of this extensive work, containing have been gazing upon a minute and per

fect daguerreotype of the man; that we The Statesman's Manual. Edw'd Walker, have traced the cause of every peculiarity New-York. of his mind, manner, and conduct, and that we have arrived at the most correct possi- ation has been issued by the enterprising

The 2d volume of this valuable compilble opinion of his merits and defects as an publisher. This volume brings down the author. Indeed, Lord Brougham's literary criti. States to the Mexican war message of May

messages of the presidents of the United cisms are generally, as in this instance, 6, 1846, being a com collection of all so just, and his conclusions so well sustain the public addresses of all the chief magis. ed by striking comparison and learned re

trates of the United States from 1789 to search, as to form, perhaps, the most 1846. There is appended to this volume brilliant and fascinating portion of his works. The life of Adam Smith is prefaced tistical matter relating to the offices of the

a mass of historical, chronological and sta. by a very able sketch of the rise and pro- Union, from the earliest times, together gress of ethical science; and the biographer with an analytical index to the whole having noticed some of the earlier works work, which much enhances its value.of that author, gives an exeellent analyti. Almost every public event can be referred cal view of the Wealth of Nations,” with to in a prompt and authentic manner:a review and appendix, which cannot fail There is also a synopsis of the constituto engage earnest and general attention, as

tions of the several states, including those political economy has become a subject of lately adopted by the people. The work study even amongst the great mass of the is certainly one of great inerit, and of a people. The other biographies Jack none usefuluess so general as to make it indisof the ability, interest, or accuracy of those pensable, not only to every library, but to we have just mentioned.

every citizen of the Union. Zenobiid; or the Fall of Palmyra. By

WILLIAM Ware. 2 vols. New-York: A Year with the Franklins; or, To Suffer C. S. Francis & Co. 1846.

and be Strong. By E. JANE Cate. HarThe merits of this beautiful romance

per & Brothers, New-York. have long been acknowledged, both at

This small volume presents light, pleahome and abroad. It may now be regard- sant sketch of one or two of the more ed as a standard contribution to classic agreeable and interesting phases of dofiction. The subject is one of the richest mestic life. It possesses little attraction and most affecting in history, and it has in the way of plot or story, but is full of been treated with singular taste and judg. sprightly conversations, which will be read ment. The present edition constitute's the with pleasure by amiable young ladies eleventh and twelfth numbers of Francis & aud gentlemen who aro desirous of being Co.'s Library of Choice Prose and Poetry, amused. To the former we would recomand will make a most appropriate and ac- mend it more particularly. ceptable addition to that popular series.

[blocks in formation]

When we reflect upon the rapid which have been such for centuries— progress of our glorious Union ; the which have stood still in this era of unrivalled increase of an intelligent and steam, and present, in their customs, orderly population, among whom the habits, and intelligence, scarcely any aggregate wealth of the whole country change from the rude ages, have no is more equally distributed than in any parallel in the United States. Those other nation of the earth ; and where who immigrate from Europe, with the the constant vigilance of multifarious costumes, customs and characters of interests, quickened by the superior their ancestors. for centuries back, are intelligence of the masses, forms a soon lost in the advancing throng, and, safeguard against the permanent pre- if not themselves, their immediate proponderance of any one class, to the in- geny become as active, enterprising and jury and oppression of the rest ; we intelligent, as the descendant of the become convinced, that upon this con first pilgrim. The red race, which tinent, under our institutions, the great- once overran the soil, incapable of adest sum of happiness is to be reached vancing with the civilization of the by the human family. The perfect whites, refuses to amalgamate, and is equality which exists among the white driven back into the wilderness, as narace, and the conviction which rests tion after nation becomes extinct. We upon every individual mind, that all find, nevertheless, in our midst, a race which this world offers of wealth, ho- which does not advance ; which, preDor and happiness, ure within the reach serving its distinctive features, remains of his own exertions, and are their at the bottom of American society, inreward, keeps active at the bottom of creasing rapidly in numbers, without society that ever living principle of advancing in their intellectual or phy. progression, which is constantly bring- sical condition. They have increased ing to its surface the most active spi- during the present century 180 per rits of the community. By this means, cent. in the whole Union, and in the that distinctive " lower class," which southern States, in a ratio greater than exists in all the countries of Europe, is that of the whites, through the operacontinually broken up, and progresses tion of natural laws, entirely unaided equally with the whole nation. The by any accession of numbers from withmechanical and rural classes of Europe, out, but rather checked, by constant

* Ist. Message of the President, transmitting to Congress Despatches from the American Minister at the Court of Brazil

. 20. Report of the Secretary of State, with Correspondence of S. W. Slacum, lato United States Consul at Rio Janeiro. 3d. Parliamentary Debate on Sugar Dulica.

« AnteriorContinuar »