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BIOGRAPHICAL CATALOGUE

BEING AN ACCOUNT OF THE

LIVES OF FRIENDS

AND OTHERS WHOS

Portraits

ARE IN THE

ALSO DESCRIPTIVE NOTICES OF

LONDON FRIENDS' INSTITUTE.
BX
7791
A3
AT
1888a friends' Schools and gnstitutions
vol

THOSE OF THE

OF WHICH THE

GALLERY CONTAINS ILLUSTRATIONS,

&C., &c., & c.

Vol. 1

A-L

LONDON:
FRIENDS' INSTITUTE, 13, BISHOPSGATE STREET WITHOUT.

1888.

It is certainly remarkable how much there is worthy of record in members of so small a Community, and how large a proportion have made their mark in the varied walks of life. Science and Literature, Art and Manufacture, Philanthropy and Religion, Mission Effort and Education, Social Reforms and Mechanical Developments, have all had their furtherance from various members of our Society whose lives are here recorded. It forms a remarkable evidence of that quickening power in what the early Friends trusted would prove " Primitive Christianity revived."

This remark receives further illustration, when it is observed that, with but little exception, the various individuals thus brought under notice have been the fruit of training in pious families, and how often they have themselves acknowledged the blessing attendant on a mother's care.

It remains now but to add that the Committee will feel themselves amply repaid for their no small labour if the general acceptance of this work does but meet the Costs incurred in its production, and the absence of any other desire than to benefit the Society may be shown by their resolve to hand any surplus, should such accrue, to the Committee of the London Friends' Institute for the benefit of the Gallery Fund.

W. BECK.
W. F. WELLS.
H. G. CHALKLEY.

LONDON,
Ninth Month, 1888.

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The Quaker of the olden time,

How calm and firm and true! Unspotted by its wrong and crime

He walked the dark earth through.
The lust of power, the love of gain,

The thousand lurcs of sin
Around him, had no power to stain

The purity within.
With that deep insight which detects

All great things in the small,
And knows how each man's life affects

The spiritual life of all,
He walked by faith and not by sight,

By love and not by law;
The presence of the wrong or right

He rather felt than saw.
He felt that wrong with wrong partakes,

That nothing stands alone,
That whoso gives the motive, makes

His brother's sin his own.
And pausing not for doubtful choice

Of evils great or small,
He listened to that inward voice

Which called away from all.

From scheme and creed thc light goes out,

The saintly fact survives ;
The blessed Master none can doubt
Revealed in holy lives.

J. G. WHITTIER.

7

BIOGRAPHICAL CATALOGUE.

LUCY AGGS.

BORN 1789—DIED 1853–AGED SIXTY-THREE YEARS.

Lithograph 9 x 7 in. LUCY AGGS was the daughter of Thomas and Lucy Aggs, and was born in Norwich, on the 20th of 4th month, 1789. Her mother was a daughter of Henry Gurney, one of the original partners in the Norwich Bank. In a minute issued by Norwich Monthly Meeting concerning her, it mentions that "after much mental conflict, she came forth in the ministry early in the year 1825 ; and her communications being to the comfort and edification of Friends, she was recorded as a Minister at the close of the following year," and the following obituary notice is taken from The Norfolk News :

“The life of this Christian lady furnishes no incidents of an exciting or remarkable character; for though it was one of considerable activity, rich in deeds of benevolence and religion, and even in some degree public, yet it was a life of sunshine rather than of sound. It had in it neither the earthquake, nor the whirlwind, nor the consuming fire, but only the still small voice, which was more powerful than them all.

She evidently never sought 'great things for herself, but her very gentleness made her great.' And the remembrance of

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