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H. B. PARSONS, Albany, N. Y. N. Y., Code of criminal procedure....... PORTER & COATES, Phila. Eliot, Romola, Florentine ed., 2 v...... Wharton, Queens of society, new lib. ed., 2 v., $5 $8; large-pap. ed., 4 v...... Wits and beaux of society, new lib. ed., 2 v., $5; $8; large-pap. ed., 4 v. . . . . . . G. P. PUTNAM'S SONS, N. Y.

Browning, Sonnets from the Portuguese. Butler, Nothing to wear..

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Carlyle, Nibelungen lied.

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Lowell, The vision of Sir Launfal, $1.50;

Davis, Gilbert Elgar's son

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Proctor, A Russian journey, new enl. ed.. Poems

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Phyfe, Seven thousand words often mispronounced, 7th ed. enl ....

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Selected from the current [London] "Publishers' Cir

cular." Braddon, M. E. One life, one love. 3 v. cr. 8. 31s. 6d.. ....Simpkin Brandon, Margaret. Hypnotised; or, the doctor's confession. Post 8°. 100 P., IS.... .Hutchinson Fauna of British India, including Ceylon and Burma. Published under the authority of the secretary of state for India in council. Edited by W. T. Blanford. Reptilia and batrachia. By George A. Boulenger. 8°. .Taylor & F Gardiner, S. R. A student's history of England, from the earliest times to 1885. V. 1. Post 8°. 414 P., 4S. Longmans Jones, W. Finger-ring lore: historical, legendary, anecdotal. 2d ed., rev. and en., with nearly 300 il. Post 8°. 562 p., 7s. 6d.... ..Chatto

20S..

Mistral, F. Mirèio a Provençal poem. Tr. by Har-
riet Waters Preston. Post 8°. 176 p., 4s. 6d. (Cameo
ser.).
Unwin
Mulready, W. Memorials. By Frederic G. Stephens.
Post 8°.
122 p., 3s. 6d. (Great Artists.)
...Low
Munro, R. The lake dwellings of Europe: being the
Rhind lectures on archæology for 1888. Roy. 8°. 612 p.,
31s. 6d ..
....Cassell
Newman, J. H. The Arians of the fourth century.
6th ed. Post 8°. 490 pp., 3s. 6d..... .Longmans
Ramabai. The high caste Hindu woman. By Pundi-
ta Ramabai Sarasvati. With introduction by Rachel
L. Bodley. Cheap ed. 12°. 58 p., Is....... Bell & S
Stanley, Mrs. H. M. London street Arabs. 4°.
5S.
Turgenieff, I. Senilia: poems in prose; being medi-
tations, sketches, etc. English version, with introduc-
tion and biographical sketch of the author, by S. J.
Macmillan. 12. 148 p., Is......
..Simpkin

AUCTION SALES.

Cassell

OCTOBER 27-29, 3 P.M.-Miscellaneous books; also, the library of the late John Patterson, of Albany, including philosophy, mathematics and history. (1221 lots.)Bangs.

OCTOBER 30 TO NOVEMBER 1, 3 P.M.-English books, comprising library editions of English authors in most departments of literature, mostly with uncut edges. (1017 lots.)-Bangs.

J. C. WINSTON & Co., Phila. and Chic. Bunyan, Pilgrim's progress, Peerless ed.. E. B. YARDY, pr., Wilkesbarre, Pa, Penn., Luzerne legal register reports

BUSINESS NOTES.

5.25

ALBANY, N. Y.-John Skinner, for twelve years with Joseph McDonough, has started in the book business on his own account, and would like to receive catalogues from publishers and booksellers.

BOSTON, MASS.-Messrs. Bradley & Woodruff, successors to Ira Bradley & Co., have removed to 234 and 236 Congress St.. where they have larger quarters and increased facilities for their growing business.

CHICAGO, ILL.-C. H. Whiting has resigned his position as superintendent of the Chicago Depository of the Presbyterian Board of Publication, and is succeeded by Randolph R. Beam, for several years with A. D. F. Randolph & Co.

FORT WAYNE, Md.-Renner Cratsley & Co., one of the largest wholesale and retail firms of booksellers and wall-paper dealers in Indiana, it is reported, assigned on the 15th inst. The creditors are Eastern wall-paper, book publishing and toy manufacturing firms. Liabilities, $30,000, and assets several thousand less. Toledo business men backed the firm, and are deeply involved.

GOSHEN, IND. - Peters & Herr, booksellers and stationers, have bought the entire miscellaneous and school-book stock carried by Dr. W. W. Johnson, druggist, the latter dropping this department from his line.

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL.-The S. Carson Company, booksellers, has just been formed to succeed the business of Samuel Carson & Co., publishers, booksellers and stationers, at 208 Post Street.

46

LAST Tuesday forenoon a pleasant-faced lady and a broad-browed bearded professor were OCTOBER 28, 10 A.M. AND 2 P. M.-R. H. B. Carpenter's li- glancing over the numerous volumes arrayed in brary.-C. F. Libbie & Co., Boston. a Broadway bookstore. My answer," she said, "to the question, 'Have women brains?' is 'Look around.' least a hundred books by female authors, and Why, there must be here at many of them are superior to the books written by men on the same subjects. They are not all novels, either; but many of them deal with the highest, deepest and broadest themes of thought, from astronomy to psychology. It is foolish in these times to sneer at women's brains, especially when visiting a bookshop." The professor freely admitted that the remarks of his niece were justified by the display of books bearing women's names on their title-pages.-N. Y. Sun.

NOVEMBER 5.-Fall Parcel Sale. This sale will include a
very complete line of remainders from John Grant, of
Edinburgh, Scotland, consisting of desirable salable
books in quantities from 50 to 500 copies, a certain num-
ber of each to sell at any price.-Bangs.
NOVEMBER 10-12, 3 TO 6, AND 7:30 TO 10 P.M.-Books from
the splendid library of the late Lewis R. Ashhurst, of
Philadelphia, comprising valuable Americana, biogra-
phy, history, etc., most of them in fine bindings. (1322
lots.) Exhibition of the books, November 7 and 8, af-
ternoon and evening.-M. Thomas & Sons, 1519 Chest-
nut St., Phila.

The Publishers' Weekly.

FOUNDED BY F. LEYPOLDT.

OCTOBER 25, 1890.

The editor does not hold himself responsible for the

Latin languages, German literature, the science of commerce, mathematics, geography, history, natural sciences, drawing and writing; the second, besides continuing some of the previous studies, enters upon the Italian and Greek, the study of the types and written characters of ancient and Oriental languages, and the pursuit of other

views expressed in contributed articles or communications. European literatures; the third takes up classical

All matter, whether for the reading-matter columns or our advertising pages, should reach this office not later than Wednesday noon, to insure insertion in the same week's issue.

In case of business changes, notification or card should be immediately sent to this office for entry under "Business Notes." New catalogues issued will also be mentioned when forwarded.

Publishers are requested to furnish title-page proofs and advance information of books forthcoming, both for entry in the lists and for descriptive mention. An early copy of each book published should be forwarded, to insure correctness in the final entry.

“Every man is a debtor to his profession, from the which, as men do of course seek to receive countenance and profit, so ought they of duty to endeavor themselves by way of amends to be a help thereunto."-LORD BACON.

OUGHT BOOKSELLERS TO BE
EDUCATED?

AMONG the many good suggestions in Mr. Stott's sensible speech at the dinner of the London Booksellers' Society (a report of which is given elsewhere in this issue), his idea of starting a branch of the Society for assistants strikes us as being among the most important. The query, "What are we doing for them?” needs an answer also on this side of the Atlantic. And yet, "the assistants of to-day are the booksellers of tomorrow." How are they being prepared for the duties of the coming day? We are afraid that in far too many cases they are left to their own devices. If a young man “takes" to the profession, he works his way up under difficulties; if he does not, very likely that is the end of the matter. He blunders through a period of years. Probably he is lucky and saves a little money, and next we find him in business for himself. The sign before his store bears the legend “Dealer in New and Second-hand Books." In reality he is simply a junkseller. He buys the largest portion of his stock by the pound, and by rule-of-thumb sells it for what he can get.

But what shall we do for those anxious to learn thoroughly the profession of a bookseller? In Germany a bookseller's apprentice is expected to have a thorough common-school education to begin with. This enables him to enter the bookseller's school, where he must work his way through a three years' course. The first includes instruction in the German, French, English and

literature, bibliography as a science, booksellers' technical information, business management, statistics, recent history, the history of the trade, æsthetics, elocution and debate, also the art of printing. Such a course is perhaps over-comprehensive; it includes considerable general education without which a man might become an excellent bookseller. But it is interesting as a schedule of the special branches of study bearing upon the knowledge required in dealing with books.

The establishment of a school for booksellers with a modified course might be made practicable in this country. It might be made as useful to the book trade in general as the Library School has become to the libraries. And how much more influential than the librarian's may the bookseller's position become in the community if he be properly qualified for his work. He has to do with books-not drawn for a week to be read, but bought to be always the companions of the buyer. A thoroughly educated book trade, competent to influence readers and thence writers, would be one of the greatest blessings that could be vouchsafed to America, its education, its culture and its literature. Is this visionary? We try to keep in view the sternly practical side of the question.

MR. STOTT's remark that he did "not think the man who reads over-night the books he has to sell the next day is likely to become a good salesman" was probably meant to be, in the language of the late Mr. Artemus Ward, "sarkasticle." Just how much a bookseller ought to read of stock he means to sell it would be difficult to specify. Much of it he would probably have no need of reading; but that he ought to be acquainted with the contents of that portion of his stock on which the profit is the greatest, we think can easily be proven. Not many years ago a friend of ours wandered into a bookstore and browsed among the shelves. Among the many treasures he came across was a superb English edition of a translation of a modern French classic. Curious to know how the work" took" in this country, he inquired of the clerk, who replied that, contrary to his expectations, the book seemed to "hang fire." "Have you ever read the book?" our friend inquired. "No," was the reply, "but I know what it is about." Our friend then opened the book and turning over the leaves pointed out a

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THERE is a general expression of regret among teachers that Senator Hoar's motion in favor of professors and teachers, which was agreed to, and which was printed in the October II PUBLISHERS' WEEKLY as part of paragraph 515 of the tariff bill, has, through some misunderstanding, been omitted from the bill as enacted. The paragraph referred to reads as follows:

515. Books, maps, lithographic prints and charts, especially imported, not more than two copies in any one invoice, in good faith, for the use of any society incorporated or established for educational, philosophical, literary or religious purposes, or for the encouragement of the fine arts (247), or by any college, academy, school or seminary of learning in the United States, in its own behalf or in behalf of any of its professors or teachers, subject to such regulations as the Secretary of the Treasury shall prescribe.

The portion in italics has been left out. Whether it was done by mistake or intentionally it has thus far been impossible to determine. There is another side to this question, however; that any exception to the general law is apt to militate against the rights of the American citizen, by throwing business which ought to be done in this country into the hands of dealers in Eu

rope.

THE AMERICAN COPYRIGHT LEAGUE.

THE annual meeting of the American Copyright League will be held at the Mott Memorial Hall, No. 64 Madison Avenue, New York City, on Tuesday, the 11th of November, 1890, at 4:30 P.M.

A report of the League's work for the past year will be made, the officers of the League will be elected, and measures for a vigorous prosecution of the campaign at the December session of Congress will be considered. A full attendance is especially requested.

Meanwhile, the Executive Committee earnestly invite the personal co-operation of every member of the League in the work of the campaign. Effective aid can be rendered by securing new members of the League (annual dues $2), by enlisting the interest of editors, and especially by urging the Copyright bill upon the attention of Representatives and Senators during the recess of Congress. The Secretary will be glad to furnish documents, and will be obliged for information of the results of work with legislators.

R. U. JOHNSON, Secretary.

THE WEBSTER DICTIONARY SUITS. To the Editor of the Publishers' Weekly:

DEAR SIR: In your edition of last week you published the text of a telegraph despatch from St. Louis in regard to the dictionary suits, which least, and I therefore beg leave to state the facts is likely to cause a misapprehension to say the of the cases.

There were three cases which arose over the

methods of defendants in selling their cheap reDictionary. In point of fact there never has print of the 1847 edition of Webster's Unabridged been any controversy over the copyright. The copyright of that edition expired late in 1889, and when that happened any one could print and sell that book if they could get any one to buy it by fair means. That was what the defendants in those cases claimed to do, and that was where the difficulty came in.

The burden of the Merriams' complaint was those sales. They said: fraudulent misrepresentations connected with

"The defendants have the right to print and sell that 1847 book, but they have no right to make the public think that they are selling the real Webster's Unabridged Dictionary. The book they are selling has long since become obsolete. It is no longer known to the public as Webster's Dictionary. It has been supplanted by a revision which we made and published in 1864, to which we have added in the years 1879, 1882 and 1884, by way of supplements, a large amount of very important matter, making it a far more valuable book. This is the book which is known to the public as Webster's Unabridged Dictionary, which is referred to as an authority by all English-speaking people, and it is this book which the public expect to get when they seek to buy Webster's Unabridged Dictionary. But the defendants are selling the reprint of the 1847 book and pretend that it is the real Webster's Dictionary. They advertise it as the original, genuine Webster's Unabridged Dictionary, but do not say what it really is. They put on the title-page the date of the printing, 1890, without a word of reference to the date of the publication of the book itself. They use all the indicia which we use in our book and by which it is known to the public, and they thereby seek to deceive the public into buying their cheap reprint of the old outof-date book, instead of buying our book. So both the public and we are damaged the public by spending their money for what they do not want, and we by a loss of sales and a discredit of our work."

The portion of the text of Judge Miller's decision which is especially pertinent is as follows, and distinctly sustains the Merriams in their complaint on the fraud:

"There is some hesitation among my brethren and myself, as above indicated, whether taking the bill as a whole, and considering all of its averments, a general demurrer ought to be sustained. The defendants use the words Webster's Dictionary' or 'Webster's Unabridged Dictionary,' placed in the same relation to their publication that the complainants place it. The date of defendants' publication on the title-page is given as of the year 1890, when in point of fact the book that they are publishing is a reprint or a photo-lithographic copy of the edition of Webster's Dictionary of 1847. The defendants also use the device of an open book on advertisements and circulars relating to their publication, as be

fore alluded to. Now taking all of these allegations together, there may be some evidence of a fraudulent intent on defendants' part to get the benefit of the reputation of the edition of Webster's Dictionary, which the complainants are publishing, and it may possibly be that in consequence of the facts averred the public are deceived and that the complainants are damaged to some extent. We think, therefore, that this is one of those cases where, as the facts are stated in the complaint, the interests of justice would be best subserved by requiring the defendants to answer, so that there may be a full and fair investigation of the law and facts upon a final hearing."

So the demurrer was overruled and the case decided in favor of the complainants.

CHARLES N. JUDSON,

determined to draw a uniform scale of prices to the public, so that the unseemly spectacle of varying prices will no longer be visible. That scale has been generally recognized as a right one, although some of us may think it is wrong. Then, I believe, it was thought by some that the starting of the Society was to provide a way for going back to full price, or at least a moderate discount; but such a movement was impossible, the discount system had become too deeply rooted, and we had to accept the inevitable, and base all our calculations on a twenty-five per cent. discount. Here we must stop, and the Society pledges its existence to stop here. Now, the question arises as to whether there is a living profit after giving such a discount to the public? Well, the appearance of you, gentlemen, here, looking well fed and the picture of health, dissi

Counsel for G. & C. Merriam & Co. pates any insinuation that it will be necessary to

THE LONDON BOOKSELLERS' SOCIETY. THE London Booksellers' Society, which has just sprung into existence, opened its doors with a dinner given in the Holborn Restaurant on the 2d inst. There were present over a hundred persons, among them nearly every leading bookseller in London. David Stott, the President of the Association, opening the dinner by giving the toast of the Queen, remarked that "the old sign of the booksellers was the Bible and the Crown. They still believed in that, and tried to sell as many Bibles as they could; therefore they might consider themselves as loyal men.'

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The Greyfriars Quartette having sung "God save the Queen," the Secretary, Mr. T. W. Burleigh, read letters of apology from Mr. Walter Besant (he thought booksellers ought to have the sympathy of all authors), Mr. Frederick Miles, Mr. Robert Routledge and Mr. Edward Jones.

Mr. G. S. Belding proposed "The London Booksellers' Society," to which Mr. Stott responded as follows:*

"I think we may congratulate ourselves on the fact that we already number 143 members. That is not much, yet it includes almost every bookseller in London-from 'Appy Hampstead to pleasant Rosherville. When we started we were provided with a list of about 400 booksellers covering the London radius, but when that list was examined we found there were many of them who were only newsvendors and stationers, pure and simple. This list is a strong proof of the necessity of the Society, and I hope we may be the means of restoring these newsagents and stationers back to their former position as booksellers. We have a few-I may say a very few -publishers on our list. At first the council were inclined to take umbrage at the indifference of the publishers, but most of us have arrived at the conclusion that the publishers are right in not coming forward in a body to join us.

"Upwards of one hundred of our members are booksellers, and therefore the Society may be regarded purely as a booksellers' society, and the members now feel that they must work out their own salvation by themselves. Personally, I am glad we have not more publishers among us than we have. I say that in the best spirit, and mean that we want to show we are a force within ourselves. Now, as a first step in our procedure, we

*We print Mr. Stott's remarks, somewhat abridged, from the report given in the London Bookseller. The portion omitted refers to a plan for insuring the members of the Society.

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hoist a printed text on your manly bosoms with the motto, We are starving.' Of course, the booksellers are inclined to abuse the publishers; but they are very good fellows, after all. Many of them are most liberal in their terms; if we will only encourage them by a little speculation and buy decent numbers, they are ready to meet us, and enable us to earn a modest living. But some publishers are not liberal, and I fear these must go to the wall. It is a word of warning. We cannot risk taking their books on the small margin they allow us, and the consequence is that their books are not visible on our shelves. I am sorry for those publishers, but their day has gone.

Now

"I should like now to say that, while congratulating ourselves on the hearty way in which the trade has joined us, we have also had the support of the co-operative stores. I believe that we have one or two of their representatives here tonight. I mention this to show the good-will towards us. The Treasurer and Secretary have assured me that the stores are willing to go the whole length with us and accept our scale of prices. Booksellers in days past have always said that the stores were making all the profit, and the customer was in the habit of talking about how cheaply he could buy at the stores. they could tell the customer that he could not get a book cheaper at the stores; in fact they could absolutely deny the charge. I had hoped that our friend, Mr. Fred. Macmillan, would have been here to-night, but unfortunately he is in America. He is the bravest man among the publishers, and I gave him all credit and praise when he came forward with his panacea of 2d. off the shilling as a proper discount to be allowed to booksellers by the publisher, so that all books might be sold at full price. It was a noble effort in a right direction, but an utterly mistaken one, for obvious reasons which I need not point out. I am sure we all gave him credit for being the only man who essayed a remedy, though it was a mistaken one. But Mr. Macmillan has made another effort, viz., the publishing of books at net price; and allowing the bookseller a discount, I think that is a step in the right direction. There are some books a bookseller cannot sell, and no persuasion or blandishment can influence the customer to buy them. I refer to technical or specially scientific books, such as we only purchase when they are ordered. In these cases the discount Messrs. Macmillan allow is high enough. But on the other hand I protest against any publisher attempting to do the same thing with cheap books. There is one publisher who has

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