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gifts, however great and wonderful in the sight of the people, would be of no value in the sight of God. It signifies not (argues he) what I have and what I understand; if I have no charity I am nothing. How extremely dangerous is it then, to break the order and peace of the Church; even though it be done with a sincere desire to promote faith and piety! for whatever good appearances may attend it for a time, they will not end well. If we do evil that good may come, we shall find, sooner or later, that the evil will remain and the good will be lost: which might be confirmed by the recent example of a large body of people, who are now di- : vided from us without being united among themselves. Division is not the way to unity: all experience teaches us, that it leads to more division; and that there can in fact be no security, no pillar and ground for truth to rest upon, no stability, no certainty, but in that Church, with its doctrines, institutions, and orders, which God hath appointed in the word. I therefore end as I began : I say, Hear the Church. Let the Churchman understand, that he then only hears the Church as he ought, when the christian forms lead him to the christian life. And

let

let others learn, that if they would have the christian life, they must have the christian forms. These hath God joined together as soul and body. No man ever had, or ever will have, any authority to put them asunder; and I have given you my reasons why it cannot be attempted without danger to the christian cause, and to the salvation of christian people.

THE

THE

USE AND ABUSE OF THIS WORLD:

S E R M ON,

PREACHED AT

ST. BENE’T GRACECHURCH,

IN THE

CITY OF LONDON,

On Sunday, Oct. 9, 1796.

TO THE REVEREND

GEORGE GASKIN, D.D.

RECTOR OF ST. BENE’T GRACECHURCH.

DEAR SIR,

W HEN I delivered the following

Discourse in your pulpit, I did not foresee that the audience would require me to print it. At the request of good people, I have already printed more sermons, and within a shorter time, than I intended or desired. The subject of this present one being almost as wide as the world of which it treats ; I would have kept it awhile longer under my eye, for the chance VOL. VI.

F F

of

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