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teach, and measures its work in the dark. As a chemist, it has the grand secret of transmu. tation ; extracting the sweetest of meat from the most poisonous of herbs. See how wise all these are, without the tedious forms of practice and experience! they have no ele : ments to learn, but are well read by imme diate infusion. From the same power, and in the same compendious manner, did the Apostles, on the day of Pentecost, attain to the knowledge of all languages without learning them. The working of God is to us as unaccountable in the one way of teaching as in the other. And doth not God still give to man a sense and a power superior to reason, when he appears plainly to have given such a power to inferior creatures? Will not he still 'teach man, who continueth to teach the beasts of the earth, and the fowls of heaven? Therefore, if any man lack wisdom, let him ask of God, who certainly will give to men as liberally as to brutes; and they have a promise that they shall be answered if they apply for direction. Where shall the ant or the bee go, but to the Creator, to learn what no reason of man can teach them? And whither shall man go but to the same teacher? The knowledge he wants is not from himself, but from the

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spirit of truth, and the word of Revelation ; and now, by the sending of the Holy Ghost, and the publication of the gospel, we see that fulfilled which was written in the prophets, they shall be all taught of God: the grace of God hath been given to all nations as univers sally as instinct hath been infused into all the kinds of living creatures: and so God is just and equal in all his works : what we have not in the ordinary way of nature, we obtain im the extraordinary way of grace; which is the better and the wiser way upon all accounts ; and he, who pretends to have by nature what God giveth by grace, is more unprovided, and in a worse condition, than the beasts that perish.

6. Upon the whole, the animal world sets before us the most evident assurances of the Divine wisdom, power, and goodness: and our duty, in respect to this subject, is equally plain from what has been said. As the go: vernment of all creatures is committed to man by the Creator, not obtained by chance, if must be considered as a trust, which we are seriously and faithfully to discharge. We think few men are fit to be žings, and are strangely apprehensive of despotism : yet is every man an absolute monarch over these

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poor brute subjects; often shamefully abused by the wanton, the passionate, and the hardhearted! A righteous man, who doeth good from a sense of duty, regardeth the life of his beast * : he abstains from all cruelty; he rewards the labour of his brute servants and doméstics, and delights to render their lives as easy and comfortable as he can ; knowing: that he must give an account of this as of every other trust. In their natural capacity, he uses them for his benefit with thankfulness to their Maker; in their intellectual applicațion, he derives improvement to his mind from the contemplation of their natures. That man is a poor animal, not worthy of the name of a man, who looks upon beasts as beasts look upon şim, and learns nothing from them; when a wise man may gather so much instrucţion, to serve him in every relation of life, whether natural, social, civil, or religious. . When we see what wisdom is found in the þcasts of the earth, and fowls of the heaven; how they perform what surpasses the power of Teason, because God worketh in thein; let us apply to their teacher, that he may assist us in all the works necessary to the saving of our souls: that we may be as wise for the . . .n * Prov. xii. 10.

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next world as they are for their well-being in this world. Whatsoever gifts and talents are necessary to them, they have by nature without asking; for they cannot ask : what we want, yve must pray for; God having iade his teaching unto us an object of choice, and endued us with speech for the great ends of praying to him and praising him. To Him therefore, who is only wise, who only hath immortality, the Lord and giver of life, who is magnified in all his works, even the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost, three persons and one God, be ascribed all honour, glory, power, and dominion, now and for evermore. Amen.

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SERMON III.

AND GOD SAID, LET THE WATERS UNDER THE · HEAVEN BE GATHERED TOGETHER UNTO ONE

PLACE, AND LET THE DRY LAND APPEAR: AND IT WAS SO. AND GOD CALLED THE DRY LAND EARTH, AND THE GATHERING TOGETHER OF THE WATERS CALLED HE SEAS: AND GOD SAW THAT IT WAS GOOR. GEN. 1, 9, 10,

THE earth is generally considered as the - place of man's habitation, and the theatre of those various actions which have filled the pages of history. When we take the earth in this sense, we find it a bad and a troublesoine world, a scene of error and confusion, in which the exploits of the mischievous bear away the prize from the actions of the virtuous, and the most wicked of men are celebrated as the bę.

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