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strikes towards Louveciennes on the hill side, skirting the inner side of the fortifications. Embarand Maisons pavilion, which belonged to cadere in Rue St. Lazare; trains every half-hour. Madame du Barri. Louis XIV.'s seat at 1 The stations are

Marly was pulled down at the Revolution.) Les Batignolles, Neuilly (Porte Maillot), Passy, Vesinet. Here a short branch turns off to Le Courcelles, Avenue de l'Impératrice, Auteuil. Pecq bridge, opposite St. Germain, but the main At Auteuil it connects with the Chemin de Ceinline goes round by another bridge to the old palace.

ture, or circular line of Paris, which unites all the

stations, and passes from Auteuil to Pont du Jour, ST. GERMAIN-EN-LAYE, or ST. GERMAINS,

Montrouge, Bel Air, Menilmontant, Avenue de 18 kil. west of Paris, in a healthy spot on the

Clichy, &c., round to Batignolles, a circuit of more slope of a hill, is celebrated for its royal Château,

than 24 miles, within the fortifications. It leaves begun by Louis-le-Jeune, 1143, but rebuilt and

the main line close to the Entrepôt. enlarged by Francis I. and Louis XIV., who was

Les Batignolles, near the Barrière de Clichy born here; as were Henry II. and Charles IX. It

and Parc des Monceaux, a flat spot now largely was the residence of Mary Stuart (in her youth),

built on, with a population of nearly 30,070. llenry IV., and of James II. of England, who died

Omnibuses, called "Batignolles," run to the Palais here, 1701, and was buried in the Italian church,

Royal. which contains a monument to him by George IV.

Courcelles, a suburban village. It is a large heavy pile; and after being used as a

Neuilly, or Porte Maillot, near the Avenue barrack and military school, is now turned into a

de Neuilly, outside the Triumphal Arch and Champs military penitentiary. James's body having been

Élysées. The avenue leads to Château de Neuilly, cmbalmed had been removed to the convent of

the favourite seat of Louis Philippe, much injured English Bernardines at Paris for interment in

by the mob in 1848. It was built 1755, by Comte England, when the sans culottes, at the Revolution

d'Argenson, in the Italian style; and, at various broke open the coffin, but it was at length safely

times, was inhabited by Talleyrand, Princess restored to St. Germains, where it now lies. A

Borghese, and Prince Murat. The house and noble shaded terrace, begun by Henry IV., is above

grounds were beautifully laid out by the king, who 100 feet broad, and 7,870 feet long, and commands

was offered the crown here, 1830. A pillar marks a fine prospect. The forest to the north was called where he was shot at just before that event. A Laia when the monastery of St. Germain was bridge crosses the Seine. Nearer Paris, outside founded in the 11th century. It covers 8,000 acres,

the triumphal arch, is a Chapel, on the spot where and two fairs are held in it--one near the Château

his son, the Duke of Orléans, was killed, when des Loges. La Muette pavilion is used for a racing | driving to the Château, 13th July, 1842. It constud, under the management of Prince, of New

tains two statues by his sister, Marie of Würtemmarket,

burg. Population, 13,500. Many English live here. The Bois de Boulogne lies beyond the fortifications, Church Service on Sunday.

and is a pleasant spot, ornamented with trees, Good hotels, but all dear. Café du Pavillon

several pieces of water, with a waterfall, &c. d'Ilenri IV.

There was once a cell here to Nôtre Dame, of Coaches to Marly, Maule, Meulan, Poissy. At Boulogne-on-the-Sea, from which the name is Cambourcy (2 kil.), near Marly forest, are some derived. It contains fine chestnuts, and the domain of Ketz, called the Longchamp promenade, near the Seine. Before Desert.

the Revolution there was an abbey close to SuresROUTE 10-C.

nes, founded by St. Louis's sister, Isabelle, which

the ladies of Louis XIV.'s court used to attend in (Lignes de Banlieue.)

Passion Week; and hence arose the custom of Paris to Auteuil.

appearing here in gay equipages at that time of A line about 3 miles long, out of the Rouen linç, | the year, when the spring fashions appear,

Avenue de l'Impératrice (or Avenue Bois [PACY-SUR-EURE (6 kil.), a decayed town on the de Boulogne), near thc Porte Dauphine.

Eure, once fortified, and given up by Richard I., Passy, on the slope of a hill by the Seine, is with other places, as a ransom, to Philippe celebrated for its residents. Franklin lived here, Auguste, 1196. Its church is ancient. About 1788, and gives name to a street; also Abbé Raynal 20 kil. south, higher up the river, is the battle who died here, 1796; the Comte d'Estaing, who field of Ivry (see Route 8).] fought with Rodney; and Piccini and Bellini, the A tunnel, of 978 feet, opens on a fine panorama, composers. It has a Ranelagh Garden, near the in the centre of which, 10 miles further, stands site of La Muette Château, and a good iron spa,

EVREUX, which is useful in indigestion, &c. An omnibus runs to the Palais Royal. Population, 5,200.

67 miles from Paris. Auteuil, near Bois de Boulogne, &c., was the

Hotel.-Du Grand Cerf (Stag). favourite residence of Bileau, Molière, Racine, S OBJECTS OF NOTICE.-Cathedral-St. TauLafo: taine, Condorcet, Helvetius, Count Romford, rin's Church-Belfry Tower-Bishop's Palace. and others. Boileau's house is still shown in the Population, 12,270. Capital of department Eure, sixth street, to the left, from the church, on the seat of a diocese, &c., and once the head of a county, St. Cloud road. A château occupies the site of which in Norman times gave name to the D'Evreux, Molière's. The spire church of the 12th century or Devereux family (now represented by Lord has the tomb of Nicolai; and there is a pillar to Hereford) in England. It stands in a hollow, Chancellor d'Aguesseau in the Place. Population, among orchards and gardens, on an island made by 4,500.

the Iton. The old Roman town of Aulerei EburoSt. Cloud lies across the Bois de Boulogne. | vices (of which name the present is a corruption), Sèvres is also near at hand A steamer from Punt was at Vieil Evreux (9 miles off), where pieces of Royal touches here.

an aqueduct, baths, &c., have been found. The

present town was burnt or harassed many times ROUTE 11.

between 1119 and 1441, when it was finally taken Paris to Mantes, Evreux, Caen, and

from the English by the French. It has good walks,

broad streets, and several old-fashioned houses of Cherbourg.

wood and plaster. By rail, opened throughout in 1858; 230 miles. The Cathedral is cross-shaped, and in various Two or three trains daily, 10 hours to 133 hours. styles, from Norman downwards, to the 16th cenA single line of rail for the most part. To

tury, the oldest part being that built by Henry I., of Mantes, as in Route 8, descending the Seine, England. It has a tower of about 260 feet, a good 35] miles. A buffet; wait 20 minutes.

north portal, and Lady chapel, with the rose and Hotels.--Grand Cerf; De la Chasse Royal.

other windows beautifully stained, besides some Leaving the main line, with the Forest and | good carving in the choir. Château de Rosny (once Sully's seat), to the east, St. Taurin's Church (which was part of an abbey our line passes through Boissy-Mauvoisin tunnel, | founded in the 7th century, and now a priest's 2,282 feet long, to

seminary), has a very ancient specimen of the Breval (8 miles), near the wood of that name, | Byzantine style (like the Norman) in the south and the river Randon, which it crosses several | transept, and the saint's curious chasse, or ornatimes, and then reaches

mented shrine, as old as the 13th century. St. Bueil (64 miles), on the Eure, which gives Gille's old church is now used as a stable. The name to the department we here enter, a part of Tour de l'Horloge, or belfry, was built 1472-97, by Normandy.

Pierre Moteau; it is 144 feet high, to the top of the Boisset-Pacy (64 miles) station, is properly spire, and has been partly restored. Two inscripBoisset-les-Prévanges, from which there is a coach tions in black letters are traced on it. Other buildto Passy,

ings are the préfecture (over the hospital), the

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Avenue de l'Impératrice (or Avenue Bois | [PACY-SUR-EURE (6 kil.), a decayed town on the de Boulogne), near thc Porte Dauphine.

Eure, once fortified, and given up by Richard I., Passy, on the slope of a hill by the Seine, is with other places, as a ransom, to Philippe celebrated for its residents. Franklin lived here, Auguste, 1196. Its church is ancient. About 1788, and gives name to a street; also Abbé Raynal 20 kil. south, higher up the river, is the battle who died here, 1796; the Comte d'Estaing, who field of Ivry (see Route 8).] fought with Rodney; and Piccini and Bellini, the A tunnel, of 978 feet, opens on a fine panorama, composers. It has a Ranelagh Garden, near the in the centre of which, 10 miles further, stands site of La Muette Château, and a good iron spa,

EVREUX, which is useful in indigestion, &c. An omnibus runs to the Palais Royal. Population, 5,200.

67 miles from Paris. Auteuil, near Bois de Boulogne, &c., was the

Hotel.-Du Grand Cerf (Stag). favourite residence of Bileau, Molière, Racine, OBJECTS or NOTICE.-Cathedral-St. TauLafo: taine, Condorcet, Helvetius, Count Romford, rin's Church-Belfry Tower-Bishop's Palace. and others. Boileau's house is still shown in the Population, 12,270. Capital of department Eure, sixth street, to the left, from the church, on the seat of a diocese, &c., and once the head of a county, St. Cloud road. A château occupies the site of which in Norman times gave name to the D'Evreux, Molière's. The spire church of the 12th century | or Devereux family (now represented by Lord has the tomb of Nicolai; and there is a pillar to Hereford) in England. It stands in a hollow, Chancellor d'Aguesseau in the Place. Population, among orchards and gardens, on an island made by 4,300.

the Iton. The old Roman town of Aulerei EburoSt. Cloud lies across the Bois de Boulogne. vices (of which name the present is a corruption), Sèvres is also near at hand A steamer from Pont was at Vieil Evreux (9 miles off), where pieces of Royal touches here.

an aqueduct, baths, &c., have been found. The

present town was burnt or harassed many times ROUTE 11.

between 1119 and 1441, when it was finally taken Paris to Mantes, Evreux, Caen, and

from the English by the French. It has good walks,

broad streets, and several old-fashioned houses of Cherbourg.

wood and plaster. By rail, opened throughout in 1858; 230 miles. The Cathedral is cross-shaped, and in various Twu or three trains daily, 10 hours to 133 hours. styles, from Norman downwards, to the 16th cenA single line of rail for the most part. To

tury, the oldest part being that built by Henry I., of Mantes, as in Route 8, descending the Seine, England. It has a tower of about 260 feet, a good 354 miles. A buffet; wait 20 minutes.

north portal, and Lady chapel, with the rose and Hotels.Grand Cerf; De la Chasse Royal.

other windows beautifully stained, besides somo Leaving the main line, with the Forest and good carving in the choir. Château de Rosny (once Sully's seat), to the east, | St. Taurin's Church (which was part of an abbey our line passes through Boissy-Mauvoisin tunnel, founded in the 7th century, and now a priest's 2,282 feet long, to

seminary), has a very ancient specimen of the Breval (8] miles), near the wood of that name, | Byzantine style (like the Norman) in the south and the river Randon, which it crosses several transept, and the saint's curious chasse, or ornatimes, and then reaches

mented shrine, as old as the 13th century. St. Bueil (64 miles), on the Eure, which gives Gille's old church is now used as a stable. Tho name to the department we here enter, a part of Tour de l'Horloge, or belfry, was built 1472-97, by Normandy.

Pierre Moteau; it is 144 feet high, to the top of the Boisset-Pacy (64 miles) station, is properly spire, and has been partly restored. Two inscripBoisset-les-Prévanges, from which there is a coach tions in black letters are traced on it. Other buildto Passy,

| ings are the préfecture (over thọ hospital), tho

bishop's palace of the 15th century, the new hospital, the college or high school, library of 10,000 volumes, with a museum of antiquities, geology, &c. There is also a good botanic garden, near the station; and, not far off, there stood, till lately, the Château de Navarre, rebuilt 1686, by the Duc de Bouillon, on the site of one founded by Jeanne de Navarre, and given by Napoléon to Josephine, who lived in it for A time.

Manufactures of coarse cottons (coutil or ticking, &c.), stockings, linen, leather, and paper. Formerly flutes, and ivory and boxwood combs were made here.

Conveyances to Chartres, Dreux, and Tillières. From Evreux you pass to

La Bonneville (59 miles), on the Iton. It has an old church with good stained windows. Glisottes, near this, is the seat of the Duc de Clermont-Tonnerre. Through a pretty valley and a tunnel of 1,640 feet, to

Conches (54 miles), on a stream of the same name. Besides remains of an abbey and castle, it has a good Church, with 23 stained windows; the subject being the life of St. Foi. Nails are made. By rail (vid Le Fidelaire, Lyre and Rugles) to L'Aigle, Verneuil, ctc., towards Dreux. (L'Aigle (22 miles from Conches), has a population of 6,600, who make pins, needles, lacets (a kind of lace), &c. It contains two churches, one (St. Barthélemi) as old as 1115, and chiefly Norman; and a brick château. It also deserves notice on account of a remarkable fall of about 2,000 aerolites, which occurred in 1795. The cause of it was investigated by Vaquelin and

Biot, the astronomers. Rilies near this (population, 5,700), on the Rille,

has manufactures of nails, pins, needles. Verneuil (14 miles from L'Aigle), in the fertile

part of the Avre, was fortified by Henry I., of England, and repeatedly taken and retaken, till given up to the French, 1449. The Duke of Bedford defeated Charles VII. here, 1424. Among its remains of antiquity are the cathedral Church and its spire (scen ten miles oft), with quaint carvings on it; the beautiful tower of the Madeleine church; the Tour Grise on the old walls, largo and round, about 66 feet dinmotor; and many Gothic houses of timber

or brick. The pablic library has 3,000 volumes, and the walks are pleasant. Population, 4,100. Leather, for bookbinders, is prepared here. Hotels.-De la Poste; Du Cygne (Swan Grand

St. Martin.) Romilly (4 miles) on the Andelle, which turns a foundry for zinc and copper.

Beaumont-le-Roger (6 miles), belonged to Roger-à-la-Barbe, one of the Conqueror's great vassals. Population, 2,800. St. Nicholas's Church is worth notice. There are also remains of the castle of an old priory (now a factory), and the tower of Beaumontel Church. In the neighbouring forest is a curiosity, called Fontaine-Roger, with the fine château of Beaumesnil and remains of Grosley and Thevray Castles. Much stone is quarried here.

(13 kil. north-east, is Noë, or NEUBOURG, with a great hall and other parts of a

castle, where Henry of England, son of Henry II., married Louis VII.'s daughter. Dupont de l'Eure, member of the late Chamber of Deputics, was born here.] Serquigny (34 miles), at the junction of the Rille and Charentonne, is said to have taken its name from Serquinius, a Roman. A camp is traceable. The Marquis de Croise owns three cotton factories here. The church is ancient. Here a live turns off via Brionne (6 miles), and Glos-Montfort (2 miles), with branches towards Elbæuf and Pont Audemer. That to Elbæuf (see Route 8), passes over the Seine to the Rouen line. That to Pont Audemer, 33 miles long, turns from GlosMontfort past Montfort St. Philibert, Appeville, etc. [Brionne is a pretty spot on the Rille, with good

fishing. A council was held here, 1050. A little below it is Bec Abbey, with the church tower (150 feet high), arches and other remains of a famous religious house, founded 1034, by Hellouin (or Harlowyn), and used by the Benedictines of St. Maur, before the Revolution. An inscription records that it was partially restored in 1854, by the Society of Antiquaries of Normandy. It produced Archbishops Lanfranc, Anselm, Theobald, and Hubert, besides many bishops successively transferred to England by its Norman kings,

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