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mean ambition of a life was attained. Pomp, luxury, adulation, and respect surrounded her; she had nothing to desire, and she soon found that to have nothing to desire, is to have nothing to enjoy.

Her husband was kind, fond, proud of her ; but he was more plebeian, more rosy, more pursy, than ever.

She had become accustomed to his fortune; she had not become accustomed to himself. Whether he was disappointed in her affection, or whether he had some secret source of annoyance, we may not divine, but he grew silent and thoughtful, as Augusta grew sulky and ungrateful; and on the whole, neither looked the happier for their union. Then, too, Augusta's not all evil heart was peopled by regrets, self-reproaches, and sometimes in the silent night by Remorse ; and against Remorse and her fell brood what power have jewels, and feathers, and cashmeres? Alas! the soft couch, the sleep - provoking chariot, seem but thorny. The lonely luxuries to which we have sacrificed our own self-respect and another's peace become loathsome. And Augusta often wished herself in such a cot as Mrs. Evelyn's, with a light heart, untortured by self-reproach, and Julian, no matter how poor, by her side, with looks of love, and blessing her from the depths of a grateful heart, for all she had dared, all she had sacrificed !.. Alas! alas !......

When seeking pleasure, or rather chasing the fiend, Ennui, in her elegant and most modish equipage, she suddenly found herself almost driving, in her base and insulting pomp, over him, whom she had so wronged, so vilely sold, with his warm heart and noble impulses, for the fineries that surrounded her — sold, when he came in his deep distress to ask her to be the accompanying and atoning Eve of the exile of Eden, came without one doubt of her proud and glad devotion — when she saw him, pale, wan, care-worn, but how sublime, how beautiful, in his manly endurance, to the friend of his race, (for Grizzy had ever a ready crumb for poor robin) robin plumes his scarlet breast there on cold winter days, and glances with his bright brown eye, and scares away the insect tribe. And it is a pretty and a pleasant spot; and there Grizzy Douglas now sleeps well—and, oh, may peace be with her !......

CHAPTER LXVII.

“A young lady decorously brought up, should only have two considerations in her choice of a husband. First, is his birth honourable ? secondly, will bis death be advantageous ? All other trifling details should be left to parental anxiety.”

The Lady of Lyons.

Augusta, followed, courted, and admired, was yet far from happy. Life had now for her no unattained object; either to be derived from her own mind, or from that of others. She had never known Ellen's exquisite delight in giving pleasure, in conferring comfort, or administering consolation.

She had some affections, but all her sources of happiness were selfish, in the lowest sense of the word. She had no delicate and secret springs of enjoyment; she had made a good match; the mean ambition of a life was attained. Pomp, luxury, adulation, and respect surrounded her; she had nothing to desire, and she soon found that to have nothing to desire, is to have nothing to enjoy.

Her husband was kind, fond, proud of her; but he was more plebeian, more rosy, more pursy, than ever.

She had become accustomed to his fortune; she had not become accustomed to himself. Whether he was disappointed in her affection, or whether he had some secret source of annoyance, we may not divine, but he grew silent and thoughtful, as Augusta grew sulky and ungrateful; and on the whole, neither looked the happier for their union. Then, too, Augusta's not all evil heart was peopled by regrets, self-reproaches, and sometimes in the silent night by Remorse; and against Remorse and her fell brood what power have jewels, and feathers, and cashmeres ? Alas! the soft couch, the sleep - provoking chariot, seem but thorny. The lonely luxuries

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