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POEMS,

CHIEFLY SCOTTISH.

PART II.

DESPONDENCY.

AN ODE.

I.

Oppress'd with grief, oppress'd with care,
A burden more than I can bear,

I sit me down and sigh:
O life! thou art a galling load,
Along a rough, a weary road,

To wretches such as I!
Dim backward as I cast my view,

What sick’ning scenes appear!
What sorrows yet may pierce me thro',
Too justly I may fear!
Still caring, despairing,

Must be my bitter doom ;
My woes here shall close ne'er,

But with the closing tomb!

II.

Happy, ye sons of busy life,
Who, equal to the bustling strife,

No other view regard !
Ev’n when the wished end's deny'd,
Yet while the busy means are ply'd,

They bring their own reward:
Whilst I, a hope-abandon'd wight,

Unfitted with an aim,
Meet ev'ry sad returning night,
And joyless morn the same;
You, bustling and justling,

Forget each grief and pain;
I, listless, yet restless,

Find every prospect vain.

III.

How blest the Solitary's lot,
Who, all-forgetting, all-forgot,

Within his humble cell,
The cavern wild with tangling roots,
Sits o'er his newly-gather'd fruits,

Beside his crystal well!
Or, haply, to his ev'ning thought,

By unfrequented stream,
The ways of men are distant brought,
A faint-collected dream:
While praising, and raising

His thoughts to heav'n on high, As wand'ring, meand'ring,

He views the solemn sky.

ᏗV.

Than I, no lonely hermit plac'd
Where never buman footstep trac'd,

Less fit to play the part;
The lucky moment to improve,
And just to stop, and just to move,

With self-respecting art:
But ah! those pleasures, loves, and joys,

Which I too keenly taste,
The Solitary can despise,
Can want, and yet be blest!
He needs not, he heeds not,

Or human love or hate,
Whilst I here must cry here,

At perfidy ingrate!

V.

Oh! enviable, early days,
When dancing thoughtless pleasure's maze,

To care, to guilt unknown!
How ill exchang’d for riper times,
To feel the follies, or the crimes,

Of others, or my own!
Ye tiny elves that guiltless sport,

Like linnets in the bush,
Ye little know the ills ye court,
When manhood is your wish!
The losses, the crosses,

That active man engage!
The fears all, the tears all,

Of dim-declining age!

WINTER.

A DIRGE.

1.

The wintry west extends his blast,

And hail and rain does blaw;
Or, the stormy north sends driving forth

The blinding sleet and snaw:
While, tumbling brown, the burn comes down,

And roars frae bank to brae;
And bird and beast in covert rest,

And pass the heartless day.

II.

“ The sweeping blast, the sky o'ercast","

The joyless winter-day,
Let others fear, to me more dear

Than all the pride of May:
The tempest's howl, it soothes my soul,

My griefs it seems to join;
The leafless trees my fancy please,

Their fate resembles mine!

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III.

1

Thou Pow'r Supreme, whose mighty scheme

These woes of mine fulfil,
Here, firm, I rest, they must be best,

Because they are Thy Will!
Then all I want (Oh! do thou grant

This one request of mine !)
Since to enjoy thou dost deny,
Assist me to resign.

1 Dr. Young.

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