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they have full power to levy war, conclude peace, contract alliances, establish commerce, and to do all other acts and things which independent states may of right do. And for the support of this declaration, with a firm reliance on the protection of Divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor.

JOHN HANCOCK, &c.

SIGNERS OF THE ABOVE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE.

Names.
Where and when born.

Age in

Died. 1776.

age. Josiah Bartlett, N. Hampshire,

1729 47

May 19, 1795 66 William Whipple, N. H. Maine,

1730 40 Nov. 28, 1785

55 Matthew Thornton, Ireland, 1714 62 June 24, 1803

89 John Hancock, Massachusetts, 1737 39 Oct. 8, 1793

56 Samuel Adams, Massachusetts, Sept. 22, 1722 54 Oct. 2, 1803

81 John Adams,

Ms. Massachusetts, Oct. 19, 1735 41 July 4, 1826 91 Robert Treat Paine, Massachusetts,

1731 45 May 11, 1814 83 Elbridge Gerry, Massachusetts, July 17, 1744

32 Nov. 22, 1814

70 Stephen Hopkins, R. I.

Rhode Island,
March 7, 1707 69 July 13, 1785

78 William Ellery, Rhode Island, Dec. 22, 1727 49 Feb. 15, 1820

93 Roger Sherman, Massachusetts,

72

April 19, 1721 55 July 23, 1793
Samuel Huntington, Sct.
Connecticut, July 2, 1732 44 Jan. 5, 1796

64 William Williams,

Connecticut,

April 8, 1731 45 Aug. 2, 1811 81 Oliver Wolcott, Connecticut, 1726 50 Dec. 1, 1797

71 William Floyd, Long Island, Dec. 17, 1734 42

87

Aug. 4, 1821
Philip. Livingston, N. Y.

New York,
Jan. 15, 1716 60 June 12, 1778

62 Francis Lewis, South Wales, 1713 63 Dec. 30, 1803

90 Lewis Morris, New York,

1726 50 Jan. 17981 72 Richard Stockton,

New Jersey,
Oct. 1730 46 Feb. 28, 1781

51 John Witherspoon, Scotland,

72

Feb. 5, 1722 54 Nov. 15, 1794 Francis Hopkinson, N. J. Pennsylvania,

1737

39

May 8, 1791 54 John Hart, New Jersey,

1780 Abraham Clark, New Jersey, Feb. 5, 1726

50

1794 68 Robert Morris,

England,

Jan.

1733 43 May 8, 1806 73 Benjamin Rush,

Pennsylvania, Dec. 24, 1745 31 April 19, 1812 67 Benjamin Franklin, Massachusetts, Jan. 17, 1706 70 April 17, 1790

84 John Morton, Delaware,

1724 52

1777

53 George Clymer, Pa. Pennsylvania,

1739 37 Jan. 23, 1813

74 James Smith, Ireland,

1806 George Ta Ireland, 1716 60 Feb. 23, 1781

65 James Wilson, Scotland,

1742 34 Aug. 28, 1798 56 George Ross, Delaware,

1730
46 July,

1779

49 Cæsar Rodney, Delaware,

1730 46

1783

53 George Read, Del.

64 Maryland,

1734 42

1798 Thomas M‘Kean, Pennsylvania,

Mar. 19, 1734 42 June 24, 1817

83 Samuel Chase, Maryland, April 17, 1741 35

70

June 19, 1811
William Paca,
Maryland,

36

59 Oct. 31, 1740

1799
Md.
Thomas Stone,
Maryland,

1740

36

Oct. 5, 1787
Charles Carroll,

Maryland,
Sept. 8, 1737 39

Now living,
George Wythe,
Virginia,

1726 50 June 6, 1806
Richard H. Lee,
Virginia, Jan. 20, 1732

44 June 19, 1794 Thomas Jefferson, Virginia, April 2, 1743 33 July 4, 1826 83 Benjamin Harrison, Va. Virginia,

April, 1791
Thomas Nelson,
Virginia, Dec. 26, 1738 38 Jan. 4, 1789

51 Francis L. Lee, Virginia, Oct. 14, 1734 42

April, 1797

63 Carter Braxton, Virginia, Sept. 10, 1736 40 Oct. 10, 1797

61 William Hooper, ussachusetts, June 17, 1742 34

1790 48 Joseph Hewes, N. C. New Jersey,

1730 46 Nov. 10, 1779

49 John Penn, Virginia, May 17, 1741 35

Sept.,

1788 47 Edward Rutledge, South Carolina, Nov. 1749

27 Jan. 23, 1800

51 Thomas Heyward, South Carolina, 1746

63 S. C.

30 March, 1809 Thomas Lynch, South Carolina, Aug. 5, 1749 27 About 1780

31 Arthur Middleton, South Carolina, 1743 33 Jan. 1, 1787

44 Button Gwinnett, England,

1732 44

45

May 27, 1777
Geo.
Lyman Hall,
Connecticut,

1731 45 About 1790 69 George Walton, Virginia,

1740

36
Feb. 2, 1804

64

}

Oct.,

II. REVOLUTIONARY REGISTER.

FIRST CONTINENTAL ARMY, 1775.
Commander in chief.

State.

Date of Commission. GEORGE WASHINGTON,

Virginia,

June 15, 1775. Major Generals. State. Date of Comm. Major Generals. State. Date of Comm. Artemas Ward, Ms. June 17, 1775. Philip Schuyler, N. Y. June 19, 1775. Charles Lee, Va. do. 17, 1775. Israel Putnam, Con. do. 19, 1775. Adjutant General.

State.

Date of Commission. Horatio Gates,

Virginia.

June 17, 1775. Brigadier Generals. State. Date of Comm. (Brigadier Generals. State. Date of Comm. Seth Pomeroy,

Ms. June 22, 1775. Joseph Spencer, Con. June 22, 1775. Rich. Montgomery, N. Y. do. 22, 1775. John Thomas, Ms. do. 22, 1775. David Wooster, Con. do. 22. 1775. John Sullivan, N. H. do. 22, 1775. William Heath, Ms. do. 22, 1775. Nathaniel Greene, R. I. do. 22, 1775.

CONTINENTAL ARMY IN 1783.
Commander in Chief.

State.

Date of Commission. GEORGE WASHINGTON.

Virginia.

June 15, 1775. Major Generals. State. Date of Comm. | Major Generals. State. Date of Comm. Israel Putnam, Con. June 19, 1775. Robert Howe, N. C. Oet. 20, 1777. Horatio Gates, Va. May 16, 1776. Alex. McDougall, N. Y. do. 20, 1777. William Heath, Ms. Aug. 9, 1776. Baron Steuben, Pruss. May 5, 1778. Nathaniel Greene, R. I. do. 9, 1776. Wm. Smallwood, Md. Sept.15, 1780. Wm. Lord Stirling, N. J. Feb. 19, 1777. William Moultrie, S. C. Nov. 14, 1780. Arthur St. Clair, Penn. do. 19, 1777. Henry Knox, Ms. do. 15, 1780. Benjamin Lincoln, Ms. do. 19, 1777. Le Chev. du Portail, Fran. do. 16, 1780. M. de Lafayette, Fran. July 31, 1777.

Brigadier Generals. State. Date of Comm. | Brigadier Generals. State. Date of Comm. James Clinton, N. Y. Aug. 9, 1776.Jethro Sumner, N. C. Jan. 9, 1779. Lachlan McIntosh, Geo. Sept.16, 1776. Isaac Huger, S. C. do. 9, 1779. John Patterson, Ms. Feb. 21, 1777. Mordecai Gist, Md. do. 9, 1779. Anthony Wayne, Penn. do. 1777. William Irvine, Penn. do. 9, 1779. George Weeden, Va. do. 1777. Daniel Morgan,

Va. Oct. 13, 1780. P. Muhlenburg, do. do. 1777. Moses Hazen,

June 29, 1781. George Clinton, N. Y. Mar. 25,1777. C. H. Williams, Md. May 9, 1782. Edward Hand, Penn. April 1, 1777. John Greaton, Ms. Jan. 7, 1783. Charles Scott, Va. do. 2, 1777. Rufus Putnam, do. do. 7, 1783. Jed. Huntington, Con. May 12, 1777. Elias Dayton, N. J. do. 7, 1783. John Stark, N. H. Oct. 4, 1777.

Major General Le Chevalier du Portail, Chief Engineer.
Major General Baron Steuben, Inspector General.
Colonel Walter Stewart, Inspector of the Northern Department.
Brigadier General Hand, Adjutant General.
Colonel Timothy Pickering, Quarter Master General.
John Cockran, Esq. Director General of Hospitals.
Thomas Edwards, Judge Advocate General
John Pierce, Esq. Paymaster General.

A TABLE showing the Force that Each of the Thirteen States supplied

for the Regular Army from 1775 to 1783, inclusive. [From Niles's Register, July 31, 1830.] Regulars.

Regulars. New Hampshire, 12,497. Delaware,

2,396. Massachusetts, 67,907. Maryland,

13,912 Rhode Island, 5,903. Virginia,

26,678. Connecticut, 31,939. North Carolina,

7,263. New York, 17,781. South Carolina,

6,417. New Jersey, 10,726. Georgia,

2,679, Pennsylvania,

25,678.

Total 231,791. The total number of Continental Troops, according to the statement in the “ Collections of the New Hampshire Historical Society," published in the first volume of this Almanac, was 231,971 ; Militia, 56,163.

Abstract of the Accounts of the respective States, for Expenses incurred

during the Revolutionary War, as allowed by the Commissioners who finally settled said Accounts.—[From Pitkin’s History of the U. States.]

Sums charged
Sums allowed

for advances by Expendi- Balances Balances STATES. for Expendi

United States, tures ex- found due found due tures.

including the cluding all from the to the U.
assumption of advances. U.States. States.

State debts.
New Hampshire, $4,273,015 02 $1,082,954 02 $3,195,061 $ 75,055
Massachusetts,

17,964,613 03 6,258,830 03 11,705,733 1,248,801 Rhode Island,

3,782,974 46 1,977,609 46 1,805,366 299,611 Connecticut,

9,285,737 92 3,436,244 92 5,829,493 619,121 New York, 7,179,982 78 1,960,031 78 5,219,951

2,074,846 New Jersey,

5,342,770 52 1,343,321 52 3,999,449 49,030 Pennsylvania, 14,137,076 22 4,690,686 22 9,446,390

76,709 | Delaware, 839,319 98 229,898 98 609,421

612,428 Maryland, 7,568,145 38 1,592,631 38 5,975,514

151,640 Virginia, 19,085,981 51 3,803,416 51 15,282,865

100,879 North Carolina, 10,427,586 13 3,151,358 13 7,276,228

501,082 South Carolina, 11,523,299 29 5,780,264 29 5,743,035 1,205,978 Georgia,

2,993,800 86 1,415,329 96 1,578,472 19,998

Peyton Randolph,
Henry Middleton, *
Peyton Randolph,
John Hancock,
Henry Laurens,

III. PRESIDENTS OF CONGRESS

from 1774 to 1788.
From

Elected
Virginia,

September 5, 1774.
South Carolina, October 22, 1774.
Virginia,

May

10, 1775. Massachusetts, May

24, 1775. South Carolina, November 1, 1777.

* Mr. Randolph, five or six days before the adjournment of Congress, was prevented from attending by ill health, and Mr. Middleton was chosen to supply his place. When the next Congress met, May 10th, 1775, Peyton Randolph was again chosen president, but being, on the 24th of the sume month, obliged to return home, John Hancock was chosen to fill the vacancy.

From

Elected John Jay,

New York,

December 10, 1778. Samuel Huntington, Connecticut, September 28, 1779. Thomas M’Kean,*

Delaware,

July 10, 1781. John Hanson,

Maryland,

November 5, 1781. Elias Boudinot,

New Jersey, November 4, 1782. Thomas Mifflin,

Pennsylvania, November 3, 1783. Richard Henry Lee, Virginia,

November 30, 1786. Nathaniel Gorham, t

Massachusetts,

June

6, 1786. Arthur, St.Clair, Pennsylvania, February

2, 1787. Cyrus Griffin, Virginia,

22, 1788. The first Continental Congress met in Philadelphia on the 5th of September, 1774; and the first Congress under the Constitution, assembled in New York on the 3d of March, 1789.

January

IV. CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES.

WE, the people of the United States, in order to form a more perfect union,

establish justice, insure domestic tranquillity, provide for the common defence, promote the general welfare, and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.

ARTICLE I. SECTION 1. All legislative powers herein granted shall be vested in a Congress of the United States, which shall consist of a Senate and House of Representatives.

SECTION II. [1.] The House of Representatives shall be composed of members chosen every second year by the people of the several states; and the electors in each state shall have the qualifications requisite for electors of the most numerous branch of the state legislature.

[2.] No person shall be a representative who shall not have attained to the age of twenty-five years, and been seven years a citizen of the United States, and who shall not, when elected, be an inhabitant of that state in which he shall be chosen.

[3.] Representatives and direct taxes shall be apportioned among the several states which may be included within this union, according to their respective numbers, which shall be determined by adding to the whole number of free persons, including those bound to service for a term of years, and excluding Indians not taxed,, three-fifths of all other persons. The actual enumeration shall be made within three years after the first meeting of the Congress of the United States, and within every subsequent

* Samuel Johnson, of North Carolina, was previously elected, but declined accepting. † Mr. Gorham was elected " Chairman of Congress” on the 15th of May preceding.

term of ten years, in such manner as they shall by law direct. The number of representatives shall not exceed one for every thirty thousand, but each state shall have at least one representative ; and until such enumeration shall be made, the state of New Hampshire shall be entitled to choose three; Massachusetts, eight; Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, one ; Connecticut, five; New York, six; New Jersey, four ; Pennsylvania, eight; Delaware, one; Maryland, six; Virginia, ten; North Carolina, five; South Carolina, five; and Georgia, three.

[4.] When vacancies happen in the representation from any state, the executive authority thereof shall issue writs of election to fill such va. cancies.

[5.] The House of Representatives shall choose their speaker and other officers; and shall have the sole power of impeachment.

SECTION III. [1.] The Senate of the United States shall be composed of two senators from each state, chosen by the legislature thereof, for six years; and each senator shall have one vote.

[2.] Immediately after they shall be assembled, in consequence of the first election, they shall be divided as equally as may be into three classes. The seats of the senators of the first class shall be vacated at the expiration of the second year, of the second class at the expiration of the fourth year, and of the third class at the expiration of the sixth year, so that one third may be chosen every second year; and if vacancies happen by resignation, or otherwise, during the recess of the legislature of any state, the executive thereof may make temporary appointinents until the next meeting of the legislature, which shall then fill such vacancies.

[3.] No person shall be a senator who shall not have attained to the age of thirty years, and been nine years a citizen of the United States, and who shall not, when elected, be an inhabitant of that state for which he shall be chosen.

[4.] The Vice-President of the United States shall be President of the Senate, but shall have no vote, unless they be equally divided.

[5.] The Senate shall choose their other officers, and also a president protempore, in the absence of the Vice-President, or when he shall exercise the office of President of the United States.

[6.] The Senate shall have the sole power to try all impeachments : when sitting for that purpose, they shall be on oath or affirmation. When the President of the United States is tried, the Chief Justice shall preside ; and no person shall be convicted without the concurrence of two-thirds of the members present.

[7.] Judgment in cases of impeachment shall not extend further than to removal from office, and disqualification to hold and enjoy any office of honor, trust, or profit, under the United States; but the party convicted shall nevertheless be liable and subject to indictment, trial, judgment, and pun. ishment, according to law.

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