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John Fowler, Hampden Samuel M. McKay, Berkshire
Samuel Lathrop, District. Russell Brown,

District.
Elihu Hoyt,
Franklin

Nantucket

Barker Burnell,
Sylvester Maxwell, ) District.

District.
Charles Calhoun, Clerk,
W. P. Gragg,

Assistant Clerk.

The House of Representatives.
William B. Calhoun,

Speaker.
Pelham W. Warren,

Clerk.
Present number of members 389.
The pay of each member of the Senate and of the House of Representa.
tives, is $2 for each day's attendance, and $2 for every ten miles' travel.

JUDICIARY.
Supreme Court.

Salary.
Lemuel Shaw, of Boston,

Chief Justice,

$3,500 Samuel Putnam, of Salem;

Associate Justice, 3,000 Sam'l S. Wilde, of Newburyport,

do.

3,000 Marcus Morton, of Taunton,

do.

3,000 Perez Morton, of Dorchester, Attorney General, 2,000 Daniel Davis, of Cambridge, Solicitor General,

2,000 Octavius Pickering, of Boston,

Reporter,

1,000 Court of Common Pleas. Artemas Ward, of Boston,

Chief Justice,

2,100 Solomon Strong, of Leominster, Associate Justice, 1,800 John M. Williams, of Taunton,

do.

1,800 David Cummins, of Salem,

do.

1,800 Municipal Court of Boston. Peter 0. Thacher,

Judge,

1,200 1. Justices of the Peace have original and exclusive jurisdiction in all civil cases in which the debt or dainages demanded do not exceed $ 20, except where the title to real estate comes in question. They have concurrent criminal jurisdiction as to breaches of the peace, not aggravated in their nature, and in cases of larceny, where the goods stolen do not exceed the value of $5.

2. The Court of Common Pleas has appellate jurisdiction in all civil and criminal cases tried originally before a justice of the peace. It has original and exclusive jurisdiction in all civil, common-law cases, where the debt or damage demanded exceeds the sum of $20; and final jurisdiction where the damages demanded do not exceed $100. Its criminal jurisdiction depends generally on particular statutes. In relation to offen

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ces at common law, its jurisdiction includes every thing, where the punish. ment does not extend to life, member, or banishment, except where the punishment is, by statute, to be administered by the Supreme Court. In case of mortgages and forfeitures annexed to contracts, this court has a concurrent chancery jurisdiction.

3. The Supreme Judicial Court has appellate jurisdiction in all civil cases where the debt or damage exceeds $ 100, and in all criminal cases originally tried in the Court of Common Pleas or the Municipal Court of the city of Boston. It has concurrent jurisdiction in all criminal cases cognizable by the inferior courts, and original and exclusive jurisdiction in all capital cases. It has also original and exclusive jurisdiction in all cases of alimony and divorce ; and chancery powers in cases of trusts, specific performance of contracts in writing, mortgages, settlement of partner. ship accounts, waste, nuisance, and forfeitures annexed to contracts. It is the Supreme Court of Probate, entertains appeals from the Probate Courts of the counties, and has a general superintending power over all inferior tribunals by writ of error, certiorari, quo warranto, &c.

4. The Probate Courts, of which there is one in each county, consisting of a single judge, have original and exclusive jurisdiction in the probate of wills, settlement of estates, and guardianship of minors, idiots, lunatics, &c.

5. There is, in Boston, a court consisting of three justices, styled the Police Court for the city of Boston, and a Justices' Court for the county of Suffolk, which has the same civil jurisdiction as justices of the peace in other counties, and the same criminal jurisdiction as justices of the peace, concurrently with the Municipal Court.

6. There is also in Boston a Municipal Court, consisting of one judge, which has cognizance of all crimes, not capital, committed within the county of Suffolk, and appellate jurisdiction in all criminal cases tried before the Police Court.

BANKS.
The state of the Banks as reported to the General Court in January,

1830.
Capital
Bills in

Rate pr. ct. &
Placo.
Name. Stock paid circula- Specie. amount of the
in. tion.

last dividend. Ardoyer, Andover,

100,000 44,252 4,403 79| 3 3,000 Beverly, Beverly,

100,000 35,016 2,366 96 3 3,000 Belchertown, Farmers', 100,000 42,527 422 31 3

3,000 Boston, State,

1,800,000 256,886 59,728 55 2 45,000 Boston, New England, 1,000,000 97,704 37,121 63 3 30,000 Boston, Globe,

1,000,000 255,164 51,595 17 3 30,000 Boston, City,

1,000,000 152,741 19,624 44 21 25,000 Boston, Boston,

900,000 94,441 26,785 03 23 24,000 Boston, Massachusetts, 800,000 106,818 66,056 71 23 20,000 Boston, Union,

800,000 108,930 51,796 79 2. 20,000 Boston, Manu, and Mec. 750,000 50,790 32,355 03 3 22,500 Boston,

North Bank, 750,000 144,255 20,3 10 05 34 24,375 Boston, Suffolk,

750,000/192,879|154,313 04 3 22,500

in.

Capital , Bills in

Rato pr. ct. & 1
Place.
Name. Stock paid circula- Specie. amount of the

tion.

last dividend. Boston,

American, 750,000 69,542 35,579 19 34 24,375 Boston,

Atlantic, 500,000 29,740 3,718 71 4 20,000 Boston, Columbian, 500,000 170,031 35,809 30 3 15,000 Boston, Commonwealth, 500,000 106,776 32,913 18 3 15,000 Boston, Eagle,

500,000 100,810 18,717 89 3 15,000 Boston, Washington,

500,000 83,136 14,514 14 2 10,500 Boston, Franklin,

100,000 57,048 796 96 24 2,750 Brighton, Brighton, 150,000 72,712 2,168 25/ 2 3,000 Cambridge, Cambridge, 150,000 91,927 5,855 06 34 5,250 Charlestown, Bunker Hill, 150,000 60,588 7,039 65 4 6,000 Danvers, Danvers,

120,000/104,729 6,620 091 4 4,800 Dedham, Dedham,

100,000 79,180 2,263 69 3 3,000 Falmouth, Falmouth, 100,000 44,490 2,731 86 24 2,250 Gloucester, Gloucester,

120,000 35,076 7,174 861 3 3,600 Greenfield, Franklin,

100,000 77,781 5,327 74 4 4,000 Haverhill, Merrimack, 150,000 66,199 11,581 74 3 4,5001 Leicester, Leicester, 100,000 39,702 4,200 40 34 3,500 Lowell, Lowell,

100,000 55,215 1,272 11 3 3,500 Lynn, Lynn Mech's, 100,000 59,804 4,418 05 37 3,000 Marblehead, Marblehead,

120,000 66,831 5,030 98 3 3,600 Mendon, Mendon,

100,000 62,914 2,566 25 4 4,000 Milbury, Milbury,

100,000 17,875 2,068 53 3 3,000 Nantucket, Pacific,

200,000 59,732 6,089 23 3 6,000 Nantucket, Man. and Mec. 100,000 37,534 3,911 35 3

3,000 Nantucket, Phenix,

200,000 30,747 2,196 73 2 4,000 New Bedford, Bedford Com'l 250,000 77,423 33,233 78 3 7,500 New Bedford, Merchants', 250,000 83,784 9,283 66 3 7,500 Newburyport, Newburyport, 210,000 43,419 8,712 14 24 5,250 Newburyport, Mechanics', 200,000 60,541 10,649 67| 3 6,000 Northampton, Hampshire, 100,000 50,440 8,550 61 3 3,000 Oxford, Oxford,

100,000| 42,070 6,807 08 3 3,000 Pittsfield, Agricultural, 100,000 55,657 4,587 67% 3,4 3,500) Pawtucket, Pawtucket 100,000 15,912 1,572 51 3 3,000 Plymouth, Plymouth, 100,000 64,219 7,836 72 3 3,000 Roxbury, Norfolk,

200,000 99,374 1,171 08 3 6,000 Salem, Asiatic,

350,000 60,900 10,917 30 3 10,500 Salem,

Commercial, 300,000 72,215 21,495 00 3 9,000 Salem, Exchange, 300,000 41,672 10,115 61 2 8,250 Salem, Merchants', 400,000 60,384 13,553 45 3 12,000 Salem, Salem,

250,000 34,724 17,231 12 2 6,875 Salem, Mercantile, 200,000 60,230 12,614 09 3 6,000 Springfield, Springfield, 250,000 98,176 4,998 001 8 4,500 Stockbridge, Housatonic, 100,000 51,715 8,592 81| 3 3,000 Sunderland, Sunderland, 100,000 52,360 3,124 15 3 3,000 Sutton, Sutton,

75,000 22,378

124 06

00 Taunton, Taunton, 175,000 55,826 1,640 74 3 5,250 Troy,

Fall River, 200,000 36,039 6,919 27 3 6,000 Uxbridge, Blackstone, 100,000 11,963 3,849 18 3 3,000 Ware,

Hampshire Man. 100,000 38,502 4,811 13 3 3,000 Westfield, Hampden, 100,000 44,104 5,455 78 3 3,000 Worcester, Central, 50,000 34,008 1,138 81

00 Worcester, Worcester,

200,000 73,063 11,905 992; 5,000 Yarmouth, Barnstable, 100,000| 44,164 4,843 671 3 3,000

Aggregate of 66 Banks, $20,420,000 14,747,7841 987,210 471 583,125,000 The Bank of the United States has an Office of Discount and Deposit at Boston.

EDUCATION.

The principal literary institutions are Harvard University in Cambridge, connected with which there are medical, theological, and law schools ; Williams College at Williamstown; Amherst College at Amherst; Massachusetts Medical College in Boston connected with Harvard University ; Berkshire Medical Institution connected with Williams College ; the Theological Seminaries at Andover and Newton; Round Hill School at Northampton, Berkshire Gymnasium at Pittsfield, and Mount Pleasant Classical Institution at Amherst. There are also 56 incorporated academies, of which Phillips Academy at Andover, the oldest and best endowed, was incorporated in 1780, and has educated 2,025 scholars.

Common schools are well supported throughout the state. The laws require that every town or district, containing 50 families, shall be provided with a school or schools equivalent in time to six months for one school in a year ; containing 100 families,12 months ; 150 families, 18 months ; and the several towns in the state are authorized and directed to raise such sums of money as are necessary for the support of the schools, and to assess and collect the money in the same manner as other town taxes. Each town is also required to choose annually a school committee of 3, 5, or 7 persons, to take the general charge and superintendence of the public schools.

According to the report of the school committee of Boston, in November, 1829, the number of public schools in that city was 80; pupils 7,430; expense for tuition, fuel, &c. $52,500; the estimated rent of school houses, $10,000 ; making the whole expense amount to $62,500. Prie vate schools in the city, 155 ; pupils 4,018; expense of tuition $107,702 Total number of schools 235; pupils 11,448 ; expense for tuition, fuel, books, &c. $196,829 25.

V. RHODE ISLAND.

The settlement of this state was commenced at Providence, in 1636, by the celebrated Roger Williams, a minister who was banished from Massa. chusetts on account of his religious opinions; and in 1638, the settlement of the island of Rhode Island was begun by William Coddington, John Clarke, and others.

In 1643, Mr. Williams went to England, and obtained, in 1644, a Charter, by which the settlement of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations were united under one government, and which continued in force till 1663, when a new Charter was granted by Charles Il., which has ever since formed the basis of the government.

GOVERNORS, &c.

Presidents under the First Charter. John Coggeshall, elected 1647 | Roger Williams, Jeremiah Clarke, do. 1648 Benedict Arnold, John Smith,

do. 1649 William Brenton, Nicholas Easton, do. 1650 | Benedict Arnold,

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Governors under the Second Charter.

do.

Benedict Arnold, elected 1663 | Joseph Jenckes,
William Brenton, do. 1666 William Wanton,
Benedict Arnold,

1669 John Wanton, Nicholas Easton, do. 1672 Richard Ward, William Coddington,

do.

1674 William Greene, Walter Clarke,

do. 1676 Gideon Wanton, Benedict Arnold, do. 1677 | William Greene, John Cranston, do. 1679 | Gideon Wanton, Peleg Sandford, do. 1680 | William Greene, William Coddington,

do. 1683 Stephen Hopkins, Henry Bull,

do. 1685 William Greene, Walter Clarke,

1686 Stephen Hopkins, [1636 Sir Edmund Andros :- Samuel Ward, the Charter suspended]

Stephen Hopkins, Henry Bull, elected 1689 Samuel Ward, John Easton,

do. 1690 Stephen Hopkins, Caleb Carr,

do. 1695 Josias Lyndon, Walter Clarke,

do. 1696 Joseph Wanton, Samuel Cranston, do. 1698 Nicholas Cooke,

elected

do. do. do. do. do. do. do. do. do. do. do. do. do. do. do. do. do. do.

1727 1732 1734 1741 1743 1745 1746 1747 1748 1755 1757 1758 1762 1763 1765 1767 1768 1769 1775

do.

Since the Revolution.

Nicholas Cooke,
William Greene,
John Collins,
Arthur Fenner,
Henry Smith,
Isaac Wilborn,

elected 1776 | James Fenner, elected

do. 1778 William Jones, do.
do. 1786 Nehemiah R. Knight, do.

do. 1789 William C. Gibbs, do.
Act. Gov. 1805 James Fenner,

do. Lieut. Gov. 1806

1807 1811 1817 1821 1824

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