Metaromanticism: Aesthetics, Literature, Theory

Capa
University of Chicago Press, 15/07/2003 - 316 páginas
This bracing study redefines romanticism in terms of its philosophical habits of self-consciousness. According to Paul Hamilton, metaromanticism, or the ways in which writers of the romantic period generalized their own practices, was fundamentally characteristic of the romantic project itself.

Through a close look at the aesthetics of Friedrich Schiller and Jean-Jacques Rousseau, and key works by Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Percy and Mary Shelley, John Keats, Sir Walter Scott, Jane Austen, and many others, Hamilton shows how the romantic movement's struggle with its own tenets was not an effort to seek an alternative way of thought, but instead a way of becoming what it already was. And yet, as he reveals, the romanticists were still not content with their own self-consciousness. Pushed to the limit, such contemplation either manifested itself as self-disgust or found aesthetic ideas regenerated in discourses outside of aesthetics altogether.

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Índice

Metaromanticism
1
Aesthetics
23
Literature
67
Theory
191

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Paul Hamilton is a professor of English in the School of English and Drama at Queen Mary, University of London. He is the author of Coleridge's Poetics, Wordsworth, Historicism, and Percy Bysshe Shelley.

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