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conclude that all is well. But the old will be very apt to be set up as a standard of right. This state of mind you must endeavor to change, as soon as possible, and to decide every question upon its intrinsic merits.

You will come in daily contact with people from all the other States and from all the nations of Western Europe. There will be many of them speaking strange dialects of the English language - that is, strange to you. But you must not forget that yours is also strange to them. Be therefore very cautious how you criticise the bad English of others -- for they can, perhaps, point out as many defects in your pronunciation, as you can in theirs. The best way is, to look over your dictionary occasionally, correct your own errors, and let other people, if they will, do the same.

Again, be very careful not to underrate the intelligence or the capacity of those with whom you may come in contact. Many of our people are very plain in their manners; but they are, like yourself, all immigrants - have been a great deal of the world, and have become shrewd observers of character. With such men, you will soon find your level, wherever that level may be. It is not uncommon for young men, who have received the best educational advantages, to come out to the West with high expectations of honor and distinction among a people not peculiarly blessed with the means of intelligence. Such expectations are pretty sure to end in disappointment. Our people are eminently practical, but too stupid or too gain-loving to appreciate very highly the refinements of the mere scholar, whose claim to distinction is based upon a knowledge of books alone.

If the scholar will in any way bring his knowledge to bear upon the practical interests of society, he may do well enough. If he will teach a country school for from twenty to thirty dollars per month, and “board round,” he may soon get the good will and esteem of the community. He must be careful not to use a language which is “all Greek” to his hearers --- must treat every one with respect and kindness - must take an interest in the welfare of every family, and, at the same time, turn a deaf ear to the small scandal and small gossip of the neighborhood.

A young man may learn more that is really useful by teaching a country school for one winter, than in twice that time spent in college — that is, if he thoroughly studies the living “subjects” around him. If he has tact and good sense enough to keep on the right side of his pupils and their parents he is then fairly started on the highway to honor and distinction. then go and make his “claim," or his purchase of wild land, and prepare to set up as a farmer. If he had not a cent in his pocket when he came to the “settlement," if he is orderly, prudent, and industrious for a year, his credit will be established.

He can then purchase what may be indispensable, in the way of a team and implements, for starting business on a small scale. After toiling on a year or two more, some one of the bright-eyed maidens who attended his school,

He can

will begin to pity his lonely condition, and consent to share the joys and the sorrows of life with him.

A small house is then built, and is enlarged as the inmates multiply. The farm is also enlarged as the wealth of the owner is increased. Orchards are planted - ornamental trees, shrubs and vines start up, and grow luxuriantly about the house. The house itself, having been built a piece at a time, from the necessities of the hour, begins to look shabby, and yet below the condition of the owner,

a new and splendid one is accordingly built, near the site of the old one, so as to save the shrubs and trees for the new lawn. The old house is sold to some new settler, and taken away.

The poor schoolmaster has become a man of affluence, and has filled various public offices with advantage to the State, and with credit and honor to himself.

This is no dream, no fancy sketch -- but the literal history, so far as it goes, of thousands of our western farmers.

But, perhaps, there may be too much hard work implied, in the foregoing sketch, to suit the refined tastes of a portion of those who, in imagination, are rearing their future castles on the broad western prairies. Let me say to you, young man, if you come to a new country to avoid hard work, you will commit a great error.

If you are a preacher, lawyer, physician, farmer, or mechanic, you must work work.

We have, out here, got rid of the old feudal prejudices of caste. Work is not only honorable, but the only means of distinction. We have, it is true, a large and flourishing establishment, provided by the State, as a home for those who endeavor to get their living without honest work: but it is not popular to go there in fact, none go, unless compelled to do so by positive law, and under the escort of

- a sheriff. If you are willing to work at any honest business, for which your previous training has fitted you — if willing to join the great army, which, with the axe, the plough, and the steam-engine, is striking out into the desert, and conquering an empire greater than was ever ruled by a Tamerlane or a Bonaparte -- COME ON! we will give you a place in our ranks, and if you act the part of a good, brave soldier, in the struggle for personal independence, you shall be promoted. It is the object of every true soldier in this great army, to “conquer a piece” of rich and bountiful land, for himself and his posterity. Our ranks are not full. We have room enough to take in half a million of recruits annually for the next century, and still there will be room for more! Come on, then, and work out life's problem, as best you can, in the free and boundless West.

THE END

K EEN & LEE Offer to the Trade of the North-West the following CATALOGUE OF GOODS connected with the Book and Stationery Business.

Their connections with large Importing and Manufacturing Establishments, both at the East and in Europe, as well as frequent visits thereto, enable them to have constanily on hand a complete assortment of Goods, which they can supply to the Trade at the very lowest prices, and on the best terms.

Merchants from the Country visiting Chicago, are requested to call and examine their stock.

CATALOGUE,

SCHOOL BOOKS.

Readers.

MCGUFFY'S FIRST READER.

SECOND, THIRD, FOURTH, and FIFTH do
SAUNDERS' FIRST READER, (Old Series.)

SECOND

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TOWN'S FIRST READER.

SECOND, THIRD, and FOURTH do.
DENMAN'S STUDENT'S FIRST READER.

SECOND

THIRD and FOURTH do.
PARKER'S FIRST READER.

SECOND, THIRD, FOURTH, and FIFTH do.
SANDERS NEW FIRST READER.

SECOND, THIRD, FOURTH, and FIFTH do.
WEBB'S READER, Nos. 1, 2, and 3.

NORMAL READER.
FIFTH

SARGENT'S STANDARD FIRST READER.

SECOND and THIRD do.

FOURTH and FIFTH do.
INDIANA FIRST READER.

SECOND, THIRD, and FOURTH do.
GOODRICH'S FIRST READER.

SECOND, THIRD, FOURTH, and FIFTH do.

Spelling Books.
WEBSTER'S ELEMENTARY SPELLER.
SANDERS' OLD and NEW SPELLER; MCGUFFY'S do.
TOWN'S OLD and NEW SPELLER.
DENMAN'S STUDENT'S SPELLER.
PRICE'S SPELLER; WEBSTER'S PICTORIAL do.

Arithmetics.

THOMPSON'S MENTAL ARITHMETIC.

PRACTICAL

HIGHER

TABLE BOOK.

SLATE AND BLACK-BOARD EXERCISES. ADAMS' NEW REVISED ARITHMETIC.

PRIMARY ARITHMETIC; COLBURN'S MENTAL do.
EMERSON'S FIRST ARITHMETIC.

SECOND and THIRD do.
RY'S FIRST ARITHMETIC.

SECOND and THIRD do,

SMITH'S MENTAL ARITHMETIC.

SECOND do., and THIRD OR NEW do.
DAVIES TABLE BOOK.

PRIMARY ARITHMETIC.

OLD and NEW ARITHLÈTIC; UNIVERSITY do. GREENLEAF'S MENTAL

COMMON SCHOOL ARITHMETIC.

NATIONAL
PERKINS' PRACTICAL ARITHMETIC; HIGHER do
STODDART'S JUVENILE

INTELLECTUAL

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PRACTICAL

PHILOSOPHICAL

Keys to Arithmetics.
KEY TO THOMPSON'S PRACTICAL ARITHMETIC.

HIG HER
“ ADAMS', EMERSON'S, RY'S, and DAVIES' do.

KEY TO DAVIES ALGEBRA.

GREENLEAF'S COMMON SCHOOL ARITHMETIC.

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ELEMENTARY GEOMETRY.
PRACTICAL MATHEMATICS.
MENSURATION; DAVIES' LEGENDRE'S GEOMETRY.
ANALYTICAL GEOMETRY; DAVIES' DESCRIPTIVE do.
SURVEYING AND NAVIGATION.

SHADES AND SHADOWS; DAVIES' CALCULUS.
SMITH'S ALGEBRA; SMITH'S BIOT'S ANALYTICAL GEOMETRY.
BRIDGE'S ALGEBRA.
LOOMIS' ELEMENTS OF ALGEBRA; LOOMIS' LARGE do.

GEOMETRY, TRIGONOMETRY, LOGARITHMS.
RY'S FIRST ALGEBRA; RY'S SECOND do.
ROBINSON'S ELEMENTARY ALGEBRA; ROBINSON'S LARGE do
GREENLEAF'S ALGEBRA.
GUMMERE'S SURVEYING; GILLESPIE'S do.
PLAYFAIR'S EUCLID'S GEOMETRY.
DAY'S ELEMENTS OF ALGEBRA; DAY'S LARGE do.

English Grammars.
BROWN'S GRAMMAR; WELD'S do.
WELD'S PARSING BOOK; WELLS' GRAMMAR.
PINNÈO’S PRIMARY GRAMMAR; PINNÈO'S ANALYTICAL do.
BULLION'S ANALYTICAL GRAMMAR; BULLION'S ENGLISH do.

FIRST LESSONS IŅ GRAMMAR.
TOWER'S ELEMENTS OF GRAMMAR; KIRKHAM'S do.
SMITH'S GRAMMAR; CLARK'S NEW do.
CLARK'S NEW REVISED GRAMMAR.
GREEN'S FIRST LESSONS IN GRAMMAR.

INTRODUCTION TO ENGLISH GRAMMAR.

ELEMENTS OF GRAMMAR; GREEN'S ANALYSIS OF da TOWN'S ANALYSIS; McELLIGOT'S YOUNG ANALYSER. McELLIGOTS ANALYTICAL MANUAL; BUTLER’S GRAMMAR.

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