Sleep and Dreaming: Scientific Advances and Reconsiderations

Capa
Edward F. Pace-Schott, Mark Solms, Mark Blagrove, Stevan Harnad
Cambridge University Press, 27/02/2003 - 360 páginas
From the study of brainstem-based models of sleep cycle control, current research is moving toward combined brainstem/forebrain models of sleep cognition. The book presents five papers by contemporary leading scientists, and more than seventy-five commentaries on those papers by nearly all of the other distinguished authorities in the field. Topics include mechanisms of dreaming and REM sleep, memory consolidation in REM sleep, and an evolutionary hypothesis of the function of dreaming. The papers and commentaries, together with the authors' rejoinders, represent significant advances in the understanding of the sleeping and dreaming brain.

No interior do livro

Opinião das pessoas - Escrever uma crítica

Não foram encontradas quaisquer críticas nos locais habituais.

Índice

Dreaming and the brain Toward a cognitive neuroscience of conscious states
1
Dreaming and REM sleep are controlled by different brain mechanisms
51
A review of mentation in REM and NREM sleep Covert REM sleep as a possible reconciliation of two opposing models
59
The case against memory consolidation in REM sleep
75
The reinterpretation of dreams An evolutionary hypothesis of the function of dreaming
85
Open Peer Commentary and Authors Responses
111
Table of Commentators
112
Open Peer Commentary
115
Friend or foe?
177
Kochs postulates confirm cholinergic modulation of REM sleep
178
Dream production is not chaotic
179
Novel concepts of sleepwakefullness and neuronal information coding
180
Sleep can be related to memory even if REM sleep is not
183
A more general evolutionary hypothesis about dream function
184
Sorting out additions to the understanding of cognition during sleep
185
Are new schemas revealing?
188

Dreaming as an active construction of meaning
118
Internallygenerated activity nonepisodic memory and emotional salience in sleep
119
Dreams have meaning but no function
121
Sleep not REM sleep is the royal road to dreams
122
The wrong paradigm leading to wrong conclusions
123
Nielsens model once again supports the supremacy of REM
124
A report card on current research on dreaming
125
The neverending story
127
Some methodological loopholes
128
Play dreams and simulation
129
Iterative processing of information during sleep may improve consolidation
130
The divorce of REM sleep and dreaming
133
Toward an attentionbased model of dreaming
135
A new theory
139
Some caution and reconsiderations
141
Desperately seeking isomorphism
142
Balderdash
145
Dreaming is not an adaptation
147
Sleep dreaming and brain activation
150
The prevalence of typical dream themes challenges the specificity of the threat simulation theory
151
Each distinct type of mental state is supported by specific brain functions
152
Where is the forest? Where is the dream?
154
Statedependent modulation of cognitive function
156
The dramaturgy of dreams in Pleistocene minds and our own
157
The wakingtodreaming continuum and the effects of emotion
158
Reflexive and orienting properties of REM sleep dreaming and eye movements
161
The ghost of Sigmund Freud haunts Mark Solmss dream theory
162
Dreaming as play
164
The interpretation of physiology
166
The problem of dreaming in NREM sleep continues to challenge reductionist two generator models of dream generation
167
A new approach for explaining dreaming and REM sleep mechanisms
169
Dreaming has content and meaning not just form
170
Mechanism and phenomenology of dreaming
172
Evidence and methodology
173
All brain work including recall is statedependent
176
Critical brain characteristics to consider in developing dream and memory theories
189
Posttraumatic nightmares as a dysfunctional state
190
Insights from functional neuroimaging studies of behavioral state regulation in healthy and depressed subjects
191
Toward a new neuropsychological isomorphism
192
Expanding Nielsens covert REM model questioning Solmss approach to dreaming and REM sleep and reinterpreting the Vertes Eastman view of RE...
193
Nielsens concept of covert REM sleep is a path toward a more realistic view of sleep psychophysiology
195
Dreaming is not a nonconscious electrophysiologic state
196
The dream of reason creates monsters especially when we neglect the role of emotions in REMstates
200
Implication of modulatory systems based on dream intensity
202
Metaphoric threat is more real than real threat
204
The value of the AIM model
205
Neural constraints on cognition in sleep
206
Some theoretical problems
207
A key to resolving contradictions in sleepdream investigation
208
Some myths are slow to die
211
Time course of dreaming and sleep organization
212
Integration of physiological and psychological models
213
Threat simulation dreams and domainspecificity
216
Phylogenetic data bearing on the REM sleep learning connection
219
The mechanism of the REM state is more than a sum of its parts
220
Neuronal basis of dreaming and mentation during slowwave nonREM sleep
221
Inclusive versus exclusive approaches to sleep and dream research
223
Evolutionary psychology can ill afford adaptionist and mentalist credulity
225
Critique of current dream theories
226
The pharmacology of threatening dreams
228
Threat perceptions and avoidance in recurrent dreams
229
Authors Response
231
Forebrain mechanisms of dreaming are activated from a variety of sources
247
Further methodological considerations and supporting evidence
252
REM sleep is not committed to memory
269
Did ancestral humans dream for their lives?
275
References
295
Recent findings on the neurobiology of sleep and dreaming
335
Index
351
Direitos de autor

Outras edições - Ver tudo

Palavras e frases frequentes

Informação bibliográfica