Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 2

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W. Blackwood, 1818
 

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Página 322 - Above me are the Alps, The palaces of Nature, whose vast walls Have pinnacled in clouds their snowy scalps, And throned Eternity in icy halls Of cold sublimity, where forms and falls The avalanche — the thunderbolt of snow ! All that expands the spirit, yet appals, Gather around these summits, as to show How Earth may pierce to Heaven, yet leave vain man below.
Página 258 - And kill sick people groaning under walls; Sometimes I go about and poison wells; And now and then, to cherish Christian thieves, I am content to lose some of my crowns, That I may, walking in my gallery, See 'em go pinioned along by my door.
Página 11 - Fair laughs the morn, and soft the Zephyr blows, While, proudly riding o'er the azure realm, In gallant trim the gilded vessel goes, Youth on the prow, and Pleasure at the helm, Regardless of the sweeping whirlwind's sway, That hush'd in grim repose, expects his evening prey.
Página 428 - To be suspected ; fram'd to make women false. The Moor is of a free and open nature, That thinks men honest, that but seem to be so ; And will as tenderly be led by the nose, As asses are. I have't ; — it is engender'd : — Hell and night Must bring this monstrous birth to the world's light.
Página 29 - They give me bread and water, being a king ; So that, for want of sleep and sustenance, My mind's distempered, and my body's numb'd, And whether I have limbs or no, I know not.
Página 25 - I have not seen a dapper Jack so brisk : He wears a short Italian hooded cloak, Larded with pearl, and in his Tuscan cap A jewel of more value than the crown.
Página 29 - EDW.: Something still buzzeth in mine ears, And tells me, if I sleep, I never wake: This fear is that which makes me tremble thus; And therefore tell me, wherefore art thou come? LIGHT.: To rid thee of thy life. — Matrevis, come! Enter MATREVIS and GURNEY K. EDW.: I am too weak and feeble to resist. — Assist me, sweet God, and receive my soul!
Página 427 - d with epithets of war ; And, in conclusion, (Nonsuits my mediators; for, 'Certes,' says he, ' I have already chose my officer.
Página 86 - And in that town a dog was found, As many dogs there be, Both mongrel, puppy, whelp, and hound, And curs of low degree. This dog and man at first were friends ; But when a pique began, The dog, to gain some private ends, Went mad and bit the man.
Página 495 - He is a great lover and praiser of himself, a contemner and scorner of others, given rather to lose a friend than a jest, jealous of every word and action of those about him, (especially after drink, which is one of the elements in which he liveth...

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