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1. Irish affairs. Breach of the Treaty by Tyrone. Siege of Black-

water. Defeat of Sir Henry Bagnall and spread of the rebel-

lion. Essex becomes more submissive and is admitted again to

see the Queen

122

2. Death of Sir Richard Bingham. Necessity of a great effort to re-

conquer Ireland. Lord Montjoy nominated for the charge.

Nomination cancelled by the influence of Essex, who under-

takes the task himself

123

3. Bacon, being applied to for advice, endeavours unsuccessfully to

dissuade him from going

126

4. Largeness of the authority stipulated for by Essex. Bacon's un-

easiness

127

LETTER OF ADVICE TO MY LORD OF ESSEX IMMEDIATELY

BEFORE HIS GOING INTO IRELAND

129

5. Misgivings with regard to Essex's purposes. Tone of his letters

to the Council. Demands and complaints. Behaviour before

he arrived at the scene of action .

133

6. Proceedings upon his arrival. Disposition of the rebel forces.

March through Munster, and return to Dublin with the army

136

7. Professes an intention to march against Tyrone in Ulster, but

wants a reinforcement of two thousand men. Disaster of Sir

Conyers Clifford

139

8. March into Ulster. State of the army. Advice of the captains.

Meeting with Tyrone; parley and truce

139

9. General result of the campaign. Difficulty of believing that

Essex's first object was to put an end to the rebellion. Con-

jecture as to his real design

141

10. The Queen demands explanations, and in the meantime com-

mands him to stay and wait for instructions

145

11. Essex's difficulty. Being unable to explain the grounds of his

proceeding except in person, he proposes to return to Eng-

land at the head of his army; but by advice of Blount and

Southampton consents to take with him only a select band of

captains. His sudden appearance at Nonsuch and reception

by the Queen

146

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1. Spirit of Essex's followers. Danger of a violent rescue avoided

by the course which the Queen took with him. Committed to

the custody of the Lord Keeper. His professions. His real

object in coming over. His reluctance to disclose the condi-

tions demanded by Tyrone. Consequence of the disclosure

when it came

152

2. The Queen's reasons for being dissatisfied with the Earl's story.

Strange news from Ireland. Popular dissatisfaction, and mea-

sures taken to quiet it. Bacon's warning and advice. Decla-

ration by the Councillors in the Star Chamber

156

3. Popular misapprehension of the part which Bacon had taken in

the matter. Violence threatened. His absence from the Star

Chamber when the declaration was made

. 159

LETTER TO THE QUEEN

. 160

LETTER TO LORD HENRY HOWARD

. 161

LETTER TO SIR ROBERT Cecil .

. 162

4. Essex still at York House. How employed

5. LETTERS TO THE QUEEN ON SENDING NEW-YEAR'S GIFTS 163

6. Suit to the Queen for a grant of land

164

LETTER TO THE QUEEN, 12th of March, 1599

7. Essex’s position. His secret negotiations with the King of

Scots. Part taken by Lord Montjoy. Object of the intrigue 166

8. Essex recommended by his friends to attempt an escape into

France: but refuses to lead the life of a fugitive

169

9. Montjoy appointed to the command in Ireland. Renewed pro-

position to the King of Scots for the arrangement of some joint

action between the army in Scotland, the army in Ireland, and

the Earl's partisans in England, to compel a declaration as to

the succession. The King of Scots not prepared. Essex

urges Montjoy to proceed with the design, who declines.

Essex allowed to return to his own house under charge of a

keeper

170

10. The Queen, having no suspicion of these things, resolves to bring

the case of Essex to a formal hearing. Judicial proceeding at

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