Transactions of the Yorkshire Naturalists' Union, Partes 12-16

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Página 138 - Bolton; and many a simple promontory, dim with southern olive, — many a low cliff that stooped unnoticed over some alien wave, was recorded by him with a love, and delicate care, that were the shadows of old thoughts and long-lost delights, whose charm yet hung like morning mist above the chanting waves of Wharfe and Greta, § 29.
Página 138 - Pre-Raphaelitism, that his first conceptions of mountain scenery seem to have been taken from Yorkshire ; and its rounded hills, far winding rivers, and broken limestone scars, to have formed a type in his mind to which he sought, as far as might be, to obtain some correspondent imagery in all other landscape.
Página 51 - Reared high their altars' rugged stone, And gave their gods the land they won. Then, Balder, one bleak garth was thine, And one sweet brooklet's silver line, And Woden's Croft did title gain From the...
Página 138 - Fig. 13. p. 151.); and had his attention early directed to those horizontal, or comparatively horizontal, beds of rock which usually form the faces of precipices in the Yorkshire dales ; not, as in the Matterhorn, merely indicated by veined...
Página 49 - ... will find that a period of peculiar prosperity, in any one branch, is the almost uniform harbinger of mischief. If we turn, for example, to the history of agriculture, the alternation between periods of high prices and great agricultural prosperity, and of low prices and great agricultural distress, is so striking, that it cannot fail to arrest the attention of every one. The high prices of 1800 and 1801 gave an extraordinary stimulus to agricultural industry. Nearly double the number of acts...
Página 221 - ... can tell where the one leaves off, and the other begins, so insensibly do they merge into each other, like day passing through twilight into night. Neither is there any barrier between species, either of plants or animals. This point is now settled. Evolution also (what no other theory does) explains the distribution of plants and animals over the surface of the earth. It explains the present condition of the races of mankind— the progress of some, the stagnation of others, and the cases of...
Página 208 - Hood hill, a pleasant undulated wooded tract extends, and beyond the broad central valley is spread out like a map from the Tees southward as far as York, with Thirsk and Ripon marked conspicuously, and the lines of railway easily traceable by the smoke of passing and repassing trains. And beyond stretch the western moors, the huge bulk of Penhill looming in front to shut in "Wensleydale like a barrier, and the higher Great Whernside peak, on the south of it, for a focus from which the undulated...
Página 138 - I.— 13 longest studied, but the scenery whose influence I can trace most definitely throughout his works, varied as they are, is that of Yorkshire. Of all his drawings, I think, those of the Yorkshire series have the most heart in them, the most affectionate, simple, unweariel, serious finishing of truth.
Página 65 - ... climate grow abundantly, and cover wide areas of surface without keeping up any clearly-marked role of lithological restriction. And this shows us in what direction the interference of the rocks operates. A more porous and more humid soil evidently, to some extent, compensates for a drier climate ; and in proportion as the climate is damper the characteristically dryloving species are more restricted to dry-soiled tracts of country.
Página 133 - And then comes the thousand feel fault which runs along the line of Lunedale, beyond which nothing is seen but Millstone Grit till we reach the Greta. The most noteworthy characteristic which Upper Teesdale presents from a botanical point of view is, that it furnishes several Montane rarities which are separated more or less conspicuously from the other localities in which they occur. Restricting ourselves to the flowering plants of the Yorkshire side of the river the following are the species which...

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