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Fig. 1. THREE WORLD-POETS (Dante, Homer, Virgil).

The Students' Series of Latin Classics

VIRGIL'S AENEID

BOOKS I-VI

WITH INTRODUCTION, NOTES, AND

VOCABULARY

BY

H. R. FAIRCLOUGH, PH.D.
PROFESSOR OF LATIN, LELAND STANFORD JUNIOR

UNIVERSITY

AND

SELDON L. BROWN, A.M.
PRINCIPAL OF WELLESLEY (MASS.) HIGH SCHOOL, CO-AUTHOF

OF THE DANIELL-BROWN LATIN COMPOSITION

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BENJ. H. SANBORN & CO.
CHICAGO NEW YORK BOSTON

E dice T 1095.385.919

FARVA!?D COLLEGE LIBRARY

GIFT OF
GINN & COMPANY
MARCH 17, 1927

COPYRIGHT, 1908,

BY

1. R. FAIRCLOUGH AND SELDON L. BROWN.
PREFACE

The charm of the Aeneid has for nineteen centuries exercised its spell over the minds and hearts of successive generations. Very early it became a school-book, and, strangely enough, it is still as a text-book that it makes its strongest and most general appeal.

The Aeneid fills a larger place in the education of our boys and girls than any other epic. This is a fact of great significance, - a fact which justifies the earnestness and enthusiasm with which editors have striven to so present it as to secure the maximum of return for so much time and attention. Failure to attain this means an economic loss as well as a pedagogic error.

The ideal book must contain enough material to insure an adequate presentation, yet not so much as to dismay the beginner by its amount or to perplex him by its subtlety. It is a question of perspective and proportion which must be adapted to the learner's point of view; he alone is to be considered. The progress of the pupil, not the display of the editor's erudition, must be the constant objective. With this ideal in view we have worked out the details of this book. If in certain respects we have failed to reach it, we shall find ourselves in the best of company; if in some degree we have succeeded, our toil will not have been in vain.

It is far easier to teach over the head of the beginner than to meet him on his own plane of comprehension; and

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