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No names are zirea seest

chronicle iseseisigo
test, 175-Arm. 172

TWENTT TEST 1271, 12
1. Smendes,
* See Pol 9. pp 2-1-2

*** ***?& * zests
For the authats its Y 22 ***** ambapod, ante
21-25, Sesostris 'the Herren Lähdut. 2.15, Dn70), Jereb 24 14
Comp. also ker. B. 2:06. J.21.

This dynasty covers the era of tbe Trojan var; and hence it is in vain seek the PROTECs of the Greeks, or any of his immediate produse *» wu cessors, in any of Manetto's liris. This dy panty, amording to the chronology of Manetho, extended from B. C. 13* B. C. 11, and Troy was taken, cording to Eratosthenes, Dionysius Argivus, P. Calo, Dionymisis laluar, thout Sic., Tarian and Eusebius, B. C. 11-3; according to Apollodoran Marlins, and the Greek chronologists referred to by Eusebius, 1164; but Tima****¥*, 11:47 Parjan Chronicle, 1:209; Diæarchus, 1212; the life of Homer, nsrribed tollera dotus, 1270; and Duris Samis, 1335. Of these fifteen historians, it will be soon that all place the Trojan war within the period covered by this dynasty,

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Y. E. E. B. C. 2. Psousenes I,

46 1273 1066 3. Nepherceres,

1277 1062 4. Amenophes,

9 1286 1053 5. Osochor,

6 1292 1047 6. Psinaches,

9 1301 1038
7. Psousenes II,

35 1336 1003
TWENTY SECOND DYNASTY, 116.
1. Sesonchis or Shishak,

21 1357
2. Osorthon or Zerah,

1372 967 3. 4. 5,

25 1397

942 6. Tacellothis,

1410 9:29 7. 8. 9, .

42 1452

887
TWENTY THIRD DYNASTY, 90.
1. Petubastes,

40 1492 847
2. Osorthon,

9 1501 838 3. Psammnis,

10 1511 4. Zeet,

31 1542 797 TWENTY FOURTH DYNASTY,

46.
Bocchoris (Bocchoris, Diod. S. 1:5.),

46 1588 751
TWENTY FIFTH DYNASTY, 46.
1. Sabacon, [Saback. Diod. S. 1:5.), 12 1600 739
2. Sevechus, So (Sethos. Her. 2: 141.), 14 1614 725
3. Taracus, Tirhahah,

20 1634 705
TWENTY SIXTH DYNASTY, 185.
1. Ammeris,

18 1652 687 2. Stephanathis,

7 1659 680 3. Nechepsus,

6 1665 674 4. Necho I,

8 1673 666 5. Psaminetichus,

54 1727 612 6. Necho II,

6 1733 606 7. Psammuthis,

17 1750

529 8. Vaphres, llophrah,

25

1775 564 9. Amasis,

1819 520 TWENTY SEVENTH DYNASTY, 117. 1. Darius I, Hystaspes,

1855

484 2. Xerxes, Ahasuerus,

21 1876 463 3. Artaxerxes, Longiamus,

41 1917 422 4. Darius II, Nothus,

19 1936 403 TWENTY EIGHTH DYNASTY, 6. Amyrtæus,

6 1942 397

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THIRTIETH DYNASTY, 38.

18

2 18

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PTOLEMIAC CANON.

- DYNASTY, 90.

ASSYRIANS AND MEDES.

E. N

B. C.

14

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14 16 21 26 38 43 45 48 54

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1 Nabonassar, from 746 B. c.
2. Nadius,
3. Chinzirus and Porus, Shalmanasar,
4. Jugæus,
5. Mardocempadus, Senacherib,

,
6. Archianus,
7. Interregnum,
8. Belibus,
9. Apronadius,
10. Rigebelus,
11. Messessimordachus,
12. Interregnum,
13. Assaradinus,
14. Saosduchæus,
15. Chunilidanus,
16. Nabocolassarus,
17. Nabocolassarus

, or Nebuchodnezzar,
18. Iluarodamus, or Evil-Merodach,
19. Niricassolassarus, or Belshazzar,
20. Nabonadius, or Darius Astyages

6 1 4 8 13 20

732
730
725
720
708
703
701
698
692
691
687
679
666
646
624
603
560
558
554
537

VASTI, 15.

59 67 80 100 122 143 186 188 192 209

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1936

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From Egypt, where it grew not well,

thou brought'st a vine full deare ; The heathen folke thou didst expell,

and thou didst plant it here.
Thou didst prepare for it a place,

and set her rootes full fast;
That it did grow, and spring apace,

and filled the land at last.
O Lord of Hoasts, through thy good grace,

convert us unto thee;
Behold us with a pleasant face,

and then full safe are wee. The procession, returning to the public square, having passed the place where Eaton and Davenport had their dwellings to gether, on opposite sides of the street, entered the spacious and beautiful temple which covers the remains of the fathers, and is occupied by the same church which the fathers organized. There, religious exercises, appropriate to the occasion, were performed by ministers of the Congregational, Episcopal, and Methodist churches,* and the learned discourse before us

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One of the hymns prepared for the occasion is so happy in the conception and execution, that we give it a place here.

Lo! we are gathering here
Now in the young green year,

And welcoming
Th' days which the ocean o'er
Did, to New England's shore,
Those noble souls of yore,

Our fathers, bring.
Here where now temples rise,
Knelt they 'neath these same skies,

The woods among ;
And to the murmuring sea,
And to the forest free,
The home of liberty,

Echoed their song.
Lives not then in our veins-
Speak not our battle plains

A blood like theirs ?
Av! and from this same sod,
Fearing no tyrant's rod,
To the same Father, God,

Ascend our prayers.
Make theirs, O God, our fame;
Worthy to bear their name,

O may we be!
Thus, wbile each gladsome spring
Comes with its blossoming,
Loud shall our anthems ring

For them and thee !

1

Kingsley's Historical Discourse.

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was delivered. And it is not unworthy to be put upon record, that the remainder of the day passed off in perfect quietness, without the discomfort” and noise of a public dinner, in a population of perhaps fourteen thousand souls, to all of whom it was a holiday.

The idea has been studiously inculcated, that of all the fanatical settlers of New England, those who came to Connecticut were the most fanatical ; and that of all the settlements of Connecticut, the old New Haven colony was the most insane

with all sorts of enthusiasm and bigotry. This calumny does the public spare le

not seem to be of modern origin. We believe it to be considDisempaa halten

erably older than the revolution. It is an old tradition in Mashe street, entered to

sachusetts, that when the country was planted, if any of the is the RNA DO

comers were too good to be endured, they were sent to Connecbarch which be madeticut; if any were too bad, they were sent to Rhode Island ; , as

and such only as were of what we should now call the juste the Continue

milieu sort were retained in the Bay colony. The origin of the learned dommer

such representations is probably, in part, the fact, that as Boston early became a commercial town, and was from 1691 the seat

of a royal governor and his court, the primitive Puritan manners De ocasion is to basr 12

became obsolete there earlier than in Connecticut; and strangers visiting Boston, and inquiring after Blue Laws and other things

of that kind, the supposed originals of English caricatures, were girl year,

referred of course to Connecticut. So in Connecticut, after the

charter had been obtained, and the simple theocratic govern19d shore,

ment, that originated in a religious covenant, had become extinct, it was natural to refer to the times of the old New Haven

colony as the times when Puritan regulation was carried to the oples nie.

highest pitch. The Episcopalian missionaries too, of the Society for Propagating the Gospel, early made a vigorous assault upon Connecticut; and besides the natural influence of their sectarian and political prejudices, it was for their interest, and

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Theirs was the godlike part
Theirs were the band and heart

Trust-tried, though few :
Grant that our souls be led,
Thinking of our great dead,
And by their spirit fed,

To deeds as true.
So doth the eaglet, nursed
High where the thunders burst,

Gaze with fixed eye,
Till, gained its pareot's form,
With the same instinct warm,
It breasts the same loud storm,

And cleaves the sky,

ame;

=pring

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