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THE

UNITED STATES

OF AMERICA mo Dr. S.a. for

COMPARED WITH

SOMI EUROPEAN COUNTRIES,

PARTICULARLY

ENGLAND:

IN

A DISCOURSE

DELITERED

· In Trinity Church, and in St. Paul's and St. John's Chapels,

in the City of New-York, October, 1825.

BY

JOHN HENRY HOBART, D. D.

Rector of the said Church and Chapel, Bishup of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the
State of New-York, and Professor of Pastoral Theology and Pulpit Eloquence

in the General Theological Seminary.

SECOND EDITION_WITH ADDITIONAL NOTES.

NEW-YORK:

PRINTED BY T. AND J. SWORDS,

No. 99 Pearl-street.

1826.

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TREASURER OF THE SOCIETY (IN ENGLAND FOR PROMOTING

CHRISTIAN KNOWLEDGE,

ONE OF HIS MAJESTY'S COMMISSIONERS FOR THE BUILDING

OF CHURCHES,

fc. &c. &c.

MY DEAR SIR,

I Know too well your attachment to Eng land, to suppose that you will approve of all the sentiments expressed in this discourse. But I have received too many evidences of your candour and liberality, to be for a moment apprehensive that you will censure an American for the frank, but, I trust, decorous avowal which he makes of his preference for the institutions of his own country; accompanied as this avowal is, by the declaration of the debt of gratitude which is due to your's, for those civil and religious blessings which his countrymen have derived, as their best inheritance, from the land of their fathers.

My object in dedicating this discourse to you, is to ex. press the feelings of private gratitude; and to bear testimony to eminent Christian worth, and to zeal devoted and unwearied in the advancement of the kingdom of Christ. Your favourable opinion of some of my early publications, in which I advocated the cause of “ evangelical truth" in union with “ Apostolic order," introduced me to the notice of individuals in England, whose attachment to that truth and order, and whose exalted character and station and influence, 'render their friendsbip most honourable

and valuable to me. At your hospitable board I often met this honoured circle; and in your society, and that of your interesting family and friends, I spent some of the most delightful hours that solaced my absence from my country, my diocese, my congregations, and my home.

But, my dear Sir, it is in your public character that I most admire, honour, and venerate you. As the prudent, and wise, and uniform friend of the Church, divinely constituted in her sacraments, ministry, and worship, to be the guardian of the faith once delivered to the Saints, you devote your time, your talents, and your fortune, to her interests and advancement; and in this exalted work of Chrstian benevolence, you are associated with the highest dignitaries of the Church of England, and with some of the nobles of that land. But I esteem it a still more enviable distinction, that in primitive principles, in unaffected piety, in every amiable virtue of the Christian, the name of Watson is not unworthy of being ranked with those of Nelson, of Wogan, of Waldo, and of Stevens.

That your life, so valuable to the large circle of your friends, and to that Church to which it is devoted, may to a distant period be prolonged in health, in usefulness, and in happiness, is the fervent prayer of,

My dear Sir,
Your very faithful, affectionate,
And obliged friend,

J. H. HOBART. New-York, Nov. 18, 1825.

THE

UNITED STATES, &c.

PSALM cxxxvii. 4, 5, 6.

How shall we sing the Lord's song in a strange land? If I forget

thee, O Jerusalem, let my right hand forget her cunning. If I do not remember thee, let my tongue cleave to the roof of my mouth; if I prefer not Jerusalem above my chief joy.

| HIS exclamation of lively and deep affection for the land which was “ blessed of heaven above and of

the deep that lieth under," and for that Zion where God delighted to dwell, uttered by the Israelites when captive by the rivers of Babylon, expresses forcibly and pathetically the feelings which must often arise in the bosom of him who, from motives of health, of business, or of pleasure, sojourns a voluntary exile in distant climes, from such a country as that, brethren, of which we may be proud, and such a Zion as that which engages, I trust, our best affections. Often, O how often! have these feelings of strong and affec. tionate preference for the country and the church which he had left, deeply occupied the mind of him, who now wishes to thank the Father of mercies that he is permitted again to address you in these walls,

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