Imagens das páginas
PDF
ePub

Given at Lovice in my Archiepiscopal Palace, 11th July, 1675.

Your most reverend and most illustrious Lordship's most addicted, and I profess most ready, Andreas Olszouski, Archbishop of Gnesme.

ORMOND to H. COVENTRY. 1675, July 22.-Yesterday, after the Council of Foreign Affairs was risen, I desired leave to speak with the King in private, and he was pleased to allow me the liberty. I told him that when the Irish affairs were discoursed of I thought that something would have been said by His Majesty or my Lord Lieutenant concerning the revenue and the performance or failure of my Lord of Ranelagh and his partners’ undertaking. I excused myself for putting him in mind of it upon my particular concernment that that affair should fairly, yet in some public manner, be examined, because use was made of that undertaking as of a strong argument to prove that the revenue was ill managed in the time of my government. His Majesty heard me patiently, though I took that occasion to put him in mind of some things that might give the world cause to think I was fallen under his suspicion and displeasure. The conclusion was (after more discourse than is fit for me to put in writing), His Majesty promised to call to my Lord Lieutenant for an account of that undertaking, which I presume he may do this night; and then if his Lordship’s representation prove suitable to his letters and discourse (of which I cannot doubt), that affair may be brought to the point I aim at, and put an end to the disquiet I have supported for five years. I thought this account of myself due to you.

ORMOND to H. COVENTRY. 1675, July 30.-Soon after the prorogation I had His Majesty's leave to return into Ireland, but some occasions of my own, and a belief that I might possibly have an opportunity toʻserve the King and do myself right in relation to my Lord of Ranelagh's contract, now near expiring, made me defer my journey till now, and now the inconvenient season of passing the sea approaching, it is time to take my resolution. My return is much more agreeable to my own affairs and to my inclination, and I do not foresee that I can be of any use to the King's service ; yet if he did think I could, I would waive all consideration of my particular advantage or satisfaction, and prefer a bare possibility of being useful to him as the greater satisfaction. If you could find an apt occasion to fall into any discourse with him on the subject, and discover what he wishes in the point, it might guide my determination. Do not suspect I beg or command you to stay so as to have a pretext to beg something else, I have been already rewarded for all I have

done or shall do; all I have now to wish is to show I have given His Majesty no cause to repent him of his bounties to me. This whole matter is left to your discretion to manage or let fall, with this intimation only, that on Wednesday I propose to return with the King from Hampton Court to Windsor, and thence to Bath.

RICHARD BELLINGS to ORMOND. 1675, July 31. Dublin.-It was my fortune in turning over the history written by one, Sanderson, of the late actions in His Majesty's dominions, to find in folio 900 or 920 (for I have not the book now by me), these words: On the King's part, Ormond, Glamorgan, and Digby; on the other, Mountgarret, Muskery, etc. This peace concluded the first of August; and folio 1646 and 7, Ormond forced to conclude a cessation with the rebels ; some say a confederacy. And these propositions gire likelihood that they are agreed.

Those are the two propositions which the two generals sent your Grace when the Nuntio and they besieged Dublin; and the short answer immediately given them was too knotty to be solved, and therefore they did not reply other than by preparing for an assault. That of your Grace's joining on the King's part with Glamorgan and Digby, or that any two of you joined in making any peace with the Irish, is an ignorant calumny. Besides those, I am confident many scandalous errors have dropped from the pens of several writers, who extended their discourse to the affairs of the three kingdoms, and therefore I should think that Sir George Lane may employ a few hours of his time usefully in collecting such mistakes relating to your Grace as I doubt not he will meet with in the many authors that did intermix the business of Ireland with that of England and Scotland.

H. C'OVENTRY TO ORMOND. 1675, July 31. Windsor.— I have received both your favours by Mr. Page; his own business is despatched with all the expedition I could to your own. Mr. Herbert, who is now in London, and told me he had taken course your Grace should be informed of it, told me something concerning some queries my Lord Lieutenant had proposed to the committee for the Irish affairs concerning some considerable sums of money, whether payable by the King or my Lord Ranelagh and partner, possibly your Lordship’s arrears may be part of it; if so, not only the King's service, but your own interest will be concerned. I intend to be by Tuesday morning at London, possibly on Monday night. I shall therefore defer this business till I see you, and when your Grace hath resolved the measures you will take, there will be little hesitation on my part to obey your Grace in things much more difficult than this.

STATE OF

THE REVENUE OF IRELAND

FOR

1661.

[ocr errors]

IRELAND.

The state of the Receipt of His Majesty's

revenues of Ireland, both certain and casual, by the Right Honourable, Arthur, Earl of Anglesey, ViceTreasurer and Receiver-General of the said Kingdom, for one year ending

the 20th of March, 1661 [-2]. The remain upon the foot of the said Vice

£ S. d. Treasurer's last account, ending the 20th of March, 1660 (-1]

6: 6: 83 Old rents ...

6613 : 6: New rents ...

2830 : 6 : 8 Quit rents ...

45108 : 7: 53 Sequestered rents

394 : 5: 1! ('ustodium rents

337 : 12 : 9 Impropriate tithes ...

983: 9: 83 Rents by particular Receivers

254 : 1: 2.3 Excise and Customs

52112 : 8 : 102 Fines for licences of selling ale

610 :11: 0 Green wax money ... ...

1913 : 0 : 11 Felons' goods

179 : 0 : 10 l'rofits of the Hana per Office- ...

50 : 0 : 0 The Charge. Respite of Homage ...

65 : 17 : 81

201040 : 5: 03 Money's received of John Blackwell and £ s. d.

Richard Deane, late pretended Treasur-
ers of the Army ... ...

300 : 10 : 7 Moneys received of James Mortimer for the remain of a certain imprest ...

121 : 0 : 0 Poll money ...

77406 : 4: 73 Moneys received out of England ... 11000 : 0 : 0

Sum total of all the aforesaid charges 201016 : 12 : :

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

IRELAND. Payments made as well to patentees for fees, pensions, annuities, and such like, as to other persons by several debentures and other warrants and directions, according to the particulars hereafter ensuing, made by the Right Honourable, Arthur, Earl of Anglesey, His Majesty's Vice-Treasurer and General Receiver in Ireland, for a year ending the twentieth of March, 1661 [-2], viz. :The Exchequer.

£ s. d. The Right Honourable Arthur, Earl of

Anglesey, His Majesty's Vice-Treasurer
and General Receiver in Ireland, for his

fee for a year ending at Michaelmas, 1661 49 : 5 : 0 Sir Robert Meredith, Knight, Chancellor of

the Exchequer, for his fee for the same
time ... ...

. ... 100 : 0 : 0 John Bysse, Esq., Lord Chief Baron of the

Exchequer, for his fee for one quarter of
a year ending at Easter, 1661 ...

Easter, 1661 ... ... 62 : 17 : 8.1 To the said Lord Chief Baron for his fee at

£600 per annum, for three-quarters of a
year ending at Easter, 1661, over and
above £188 13s. 1}d. for his ancient fee

paid him within the said time ... ... 261 : 6:10. To him also for his fee at £251 10s. 10d. per

annum, and for an increase of the said
fee at £348 9s. 2d. per annum, making in
all £600 per annum, for three-quarters of

a year ending at Christmas, 1661 ... 450 : 0 : 0) Sir Richard Kenedy, Knight, second Baron of

the Exchequer, for his fee for a year

ending at Michaelmas, 1661 ... ... 100 : 0 : 0 Thomas Dongan, Esq., another of the Barons

of the same Court for the same time ... 66 : 13 : 1 Sir William Domvile, Knight, His Majesty's

Attorney General, for his fee for the same
time ... ... ...

... 75 : 0 : 0 John Temple, Esq., His Majesty's Solicitor

General, for his fee for a year ending at
Michaelmas, 1661 ... ... ... ...

75 : 0 : 0 Philipfferneley, Esq., Chief Remembrancer

of the Court of Exchequer, for his fee for a
quarter of a year, ending the 24th of
June, 1659, and for half-a-year ending at
Michaelmas, 1661 ... ...

22 : 10 : 0 Sir James Ware, Knight, His Majesty's

Auditor General, for his fee for a year

ending at Michaelmas, 1661 ... ... 234 : 6: 3 Sir Alan Brodrick, Knight, Surveyor General,

for his fee for half-a-year ending at
Easter, 1661

30 : 0 : 0

[ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors]

Patrick Tallant, General Escheator of the

province of Leinster, for his fee for a year

ending at Michaelmas, 1661 ... ... Henry Warren, Esq., second Remembrancer

of the Exchequer, for his fee for the same

time ... Nicholas Loftus, Esq., C'lerk of the Pipe, for

his fee for a year ending at Michaelmas,

1661 ... .. Roger Moore, Esq., Chief Chamberlain, for

his fee for the same time ... ... ... Robert Kenedy, Esq., second Chamberlain,

for his fee for the same time ... Maurice Keating, Esq., second Engrosser and

Comptroller of the Pipe, for his fee for

half-a-year ending at Easter, 1661 Robert Ardagh, Somonister, for his fee for a

year ending at Michaelmas, 1661 ... Thomas Lea, Transcriptor and Foreign

Opposer, for his fee for the same time ... l'hilip Carpenter, Serjeant-at-Arms, for his

fee for a year ending at Michaelmas, 1661 To him also as Pursuivant of the Exchequer,

for his fee for the same time ... ... Silvanus Stirrup, Usher of the Exchequer,

for his fee, and for an allowance for
providing of ink for the said Court for the

same time ... ... ... ... ... William Dobbins, Esq., Escheator General of

Ulster, for his fee for the same time ... John Burmiston, gentleman, Marshal of the

four Courts, for his fee for half-a-year

ending at Easter, 1661 ... William Meade, Esq., Escheator of the

Province of Munster, for his fee for half

a-year ending at Easter, 1661 ... ... Johm Exham, Clerk of the First Fruits and

20th parts, for his fee for a year and a half

ending at Michaelmas, 1661 ... ... Philip Jones, Crier of the Exchequer, for his

fee for a year ending at Michaelmas, 1661

[merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small]

Sum. ... 1770 : 12 : 6

ling's Bench.

[ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors]

The Right Honourable James, Lord Baron of

Santry, Lord Chief Justice of the King's
Bench, for his fee for a year ending at
Michaelmas, 1661

... ...

[ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors]
« AnteriorContinuar »