An Introduction to the True Astronomy: Or, Astronomical Lectures, Read in the Astronomical School of the University of Oxford. By John Keill, ...

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Samuel Richardson, 1739 - 396 páginas

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Página 49 - The common names, or meaning of these words, in the same order, are, the Ram, the Bull, the Twins, the Crab, the Lion, the Virgin, the Scales, the Scorpion, the Archer, the Goat, the Waterer, and the Fishes. Fig. 183. The 12 signs of the zodiac, together with the sun, and the earth revolving around him, are represented at fig.
Página vi - Lord ; for he spake the word, and they were made ; he commanded, and they were created. He hath made them fast for ever and ever ; he hath given them a law which shall not be broken.
Página 216 - When applied to the setting of a star it denotes the entering or iminerging into the sun's rays, and thus becoming lost in the lustre of his beams. A star rises heliacally when, after it has been in conjunction with the sun, and on that...
Página 101 - ... parts appear as it were toothed and cut with innumerable notches and breaks ; and even in the dark part, near the borders of the lucid surface, there are seen some small spaces enlightened by the sun's beams.
Página 364 - ... Sunday of January, in a common year, will show all the Sundays throughout the year, and to whatever days in the rest of the months, that letter is put, these days are all Sundays. If the first day of January be on a Sunday, the next year will begin on Monday, and the Sunday will fall on the seventh day, to which is annexed the letter G, which therefore will be the Sunday letter for that year; the next year beginning on Tuesday, the first Sunday will fall on the sixth of January, to which is adjoined...
Página 102 - Afterwards many more shining spaces are observed to arise by degrees, and to appear within the dark side of the moon, which before they drew near to the confines of light and darkness were invisible, being without any light, and totally immersed in the shadow. The contrary is observed in the decreasing...
Página xii - Keil observed, our author, with indefatigable pains, for more than forty years, watched the motions of the stars, and has given us innumerable observations of the sun, moon, and planets, which he made with very large instruments...
Página 74 - The true cause of the variation of the seasons consists in the inclination of the axis of the earth to the plane of its orbit; or, in other words, to the ecliptic.
Página 95 - ... nineteen years ; after which time either of the nodes, having receded from any point of the ecliptic, returns to the same again ; and when the moon is in the node, she is also seen in the ecliptic. If the line of nodes were immoveable, that is, if it had no other motion than that whereby it is carried round the sun, it would always look to the same point of the ecliptic, or would keep parallel...
Página 124 - ... is supposed to be divided into twelve equal parts, called digits : in a total eclipse of the luminaries, the whole disc is obscured ; in a partial eclipse, only a part thereof. If we imagine a plane to pass through the centre of the earth, so that the line which joins the centres of the sun and earth, may be perpendicular to this plane, it will make on the surface of the earth a circle, which will separate the illuminated hemisphere of the earth from the dark. This circle, otherwise termed the...

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