Hara-kiri: Japanese Ritual Suicide

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Tuttle Publishing, 17/07/2012 - 130 páginas
Hari-Kiri is a definitive text on Japanese ritual suicide, also known as suppuku.

To the average westerner, the word hara-kiri conjures up an image of excruciating, self-inflicted pain; of a deep, fatal incision. To the Japanese, this kind of suicide embodies the best qualities of courage, honor, and discipline.

Through extensive research, author Jack Seward brings to the English-speaking public a dissertation on the subject that is thoroughly enlightening. Fluent in speaking, reading, and writing Japanese, he was able to glean information from ancient documents—many of them scrolls in the Japanese archives—that few foreigners have seen. The earliest writings on hara-kiri (known more formally as seppuku) are thus revealed, as are the intricate rituals surrounding the ceremony.

"The major purpose of this book," says the author, "is to clarify the historical and sociological significance of a unique method of self-destruction." In fulfilling this purpose, author Seward has come up with a definitive work that is sure to arouse interest both as a scholarly effort and as simple, fascinating reading.
 

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Índice

Introduction
CUSTOMS AND FORMALITIES 41
SEPPUKU AND SHINJU 73
REVIVAL OF SEPPUKU 91
Glossary 105
Direitos de autor

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Acerca do autor (2012)

Jack Seward has written forty-four books on Japan in both English and Japanese, including three Charles E. Tuttle titles--Outrageous Japanese (1991), Hari-Kiri (1968), and Cave of the Chinese Skeletons (1964)--and his best-known work, The Japanese (William Morrow, 1972). He studied Japanese at the US Army language school at the University of Michigan. He was sent to Japan during the Occupation as an army officer and later served as a CIA agent. He remained in Japan for twenty-five years as a businessman and writer. Seward is a regular contributor to Nichibei Journal and Tokyo Weekender, and he lives in Houston, TX.

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