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Bragg. Hardee. Johnson.
Breckenridge. Beauregard.

Polk.
COUNCIL OF WAR BEFORE THE BATTLE OF PITTSBURG LANDING. (Page 145.)

IN

THE REBEL ARMY

BEING

A NARRATIVE OF PERSONAL ADVENTURES

IN

THE INFANTRY, ORDNANCE, CAVALRY, COURIER,

AND

HOSPITAL SERVICES;

WITH

AN EXHIBITION OF THE POWER, PURPOSES, EARNEST.
NESS, MILITARY DESPOTISM, AND DEMOR-

ALIZATION OF THE SOUTH.

BY AN IMPRESSED NEW YORKER.

NEW YORK:
A. S. BARNES & BURR,

51 & 53 JOHN-STREET.

186 4.

23352 6-2.

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Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1862,

By A. S. BARNES & BURR, Be the Olerk's Office of the District Court of the United States for the

Southern District of New York,

RENNTE, SAEA & LINDSAY, SPEREOTYPERS AND ELECTROTYPERS, 81, 83, &.85 CENTRE-STREET,

New Pork.

GEORGE W. WOOD, PRINTER

No. 2 Dutch-st., N. Y,

PREFACE.

A WORD TO THE READER.

I GIVE to you, in the following pages, a simple narrative of facts. I have no motive to misrepresent or conceal. I have an honest desire to describe faithfully and truly what I saw and heard during thirteen months of enforced service in the Rebel army.

If I should seem to you to speak too favorably of individuals or occurrences in the South, I beg you to consider that I give impressions obtained when in the South. If my book has any value it lies in this very fact, that it gives you an in- . terior view of this stupendous rebellion, which can not be obtained by one standing in the North and looking at it only with Northern eyes.

I have confidence in truth; and unwelcome truth, is none the less truth, and none the less

valuable. Sure am I, that if the North had known the whole truth as to the power, the unanimity, and the deadly purpose of the lead. ers in the rebellion, the government would have been far better prepared for promptly meeting the crisis. Look then candidly at facts, and give them their true weight.

As I am under no obligation, from duty or Honor, to conceal what I was compelled to see and hear in the South, I tell it frankly; hoping it may be of value to my bleeding country, I tell it plainly. I have no cause to love the Confederate usurpation, as will fully appear, yet I refrain from abusive and denunciatory epithets, because both my taste and judgment enjoin it.

For the accuracy of names, dates, and places, I rely wholly upon memory. I kept memo randa during my whole service, but was compelled to leave every thing when I attempted escape, as such papers then found in my posses sion would have secured my certain death; but in all material things I can promise the accuracy which a retentive memory secures.

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