A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers

Capa
Penguin, 01/12/1998 - 368 páginas
Thoreau's account of his 1839 boat trip is a finely crafted tapestry of travel writing, essays, and lyrical poetry. Thoreau interweaves descriptions of natural phenomena, the rural landscape, and local characters with digressions on literature and philosophy, the Native American and Puritian histories of New England, the Bhagavad Gita, the imperfections of Christianity, and many other subjects. Although it shares many of the themes in Thoreau's classic WaldenA Week on the Concord offers an alternative perspective on his analaysis of the relationship between nature and culture.

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LibraryThing Review

Procura do Utilizador  - overthemoon - LibraryThing

An abridged version of the original, cutting out the flights of fancy and boring bits. I really like the introduction which explains in detail the fonts used (Thorowgood for display, perhaps a play on ... Ler crítica na íntegra

LibraryThing Review

Procura do Utilizador  - HarryMacDonald - LibraryThing

This is a somewhat editied version of Thoreau's first notable book-length work, nominally celebrating a boat-trip he made with his beloved brother John, but of-course --Thoreau being what he was ... Ler crítica na íntegra

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Acerca do autor (1998)

Henry David Thoreau was born in Concord, Massachusetts in 1817. He graduated from Harvard in 1837, the same year he began his lifelong Journal. Inspired by Ralph Waldo Emerson, Thoreau became a key member of the Transcendentalist movement that included Margaret Fuller and Bronson Alcott. The Transcendentalists' faith in nature was tested by Thoreau between 1845 and 1847 when he lived for twenty-six months in a homemade hut at Walden Pond. While living at Walden, Thoreau worked on the two books published during his lifetime: Walden (1854) and A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849). Several of his other works, including The Maine Woods, Cape Cod, and Excursions, were published posthumously. Thoreau died in Concord, at the age of forty-four, in 1862.

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