Imagens das páginas
PDF
ePub
[blocks in formation]

45 roundabout jackets for the boys.

Eight hours of each day are devoted to work, and four are passed in school, which is conducted on a system of mutual instruction.

Seventy-one of the children could neither read nor write when admitted, and most of the others were but imperfectly taught even in these particulars. Fifty-five have acquired a knowledge of reading and writing in the house.

A well selected Juvenile library has been generously presented to the Institution. The donors are for the most part booksellers of Philadelphia. It consists of 75 maps and about 1700 books. Every child that can read is encouraged and required to receive and keep in use a book belonging to the library. A desire of knowledge is thus excited-a habit and love of reading are promo. ted, and means of instruction are afforded which it is hoped will prove of lasting utility.

Satisfactory accounts have been received from all the children who have been bound out, except three.

Eleven boys who had nearly attained to full age were shipped (with their own consent) on board of vessels bound to the Pacific ocean, on long whaling voyages; a destination which is believed to be the most eligible for those who have been long permitted to indulge themselves in habits of idleness and dissipation.

As a practical proof of the value of the establishment, the Managers refer with pride to the sensible diminution in the number of youthful offenders arraigned at the bar of the criminal courts. This effect was obvious soon after the house was opened, and it has now continued too long, to permit a doubt of its cause.

If the young

are withdrawn from temptation, and no longer either exhibit or imitate evil examples, it may be hoped that the numbers of adult criminals will in like manner soon be lessened the reformation of those who have been heretofore growing up in a career of guilt.

Additional accommodations having become necessary for the increased number of boys, the Managers erected a range of work shops, 220 feet in length by 20 feet in depth, and two stories high. They also erected a building containing one hundred and ten dormitories, and a large kitchen and enlarged the chapel and boy's dining room, and built a stable. These buildings are of stone and are substantially finished.

Ample room is now provided for one hundred and ninety-six boys and eighty-three girls. After the discipline and instruction of the house have been permitted to produce their due effect, it is believed that as many will be bound out, annually, as are admitted. The numbers will therefore in all probability not be at all too great for the accommodations now provided, which are calculated for 278 persons.

Considerable expenses have been incurred, by reason of these improvements; and also to defray the temporary loan of 6,500 dollars, and to aid in the maintenance of the Institution. Loans have therefore been obtained to the amount of 20,000 dollars. They are secured by mortgages on the ground and buildings. The debt due by the Institution now exceeds twenty-eight thousand

dollars.

In conclusion, the Managers would state, that the experiment, which has thus far been made, has answered their most sanguine expectations. Numbers have been withdrawn from crime and ignorance, and have been in

109

structed in the knowledge of virtue, and in the means of obtaining an honest livelihood. The Managers hope hereafter to be able to congratulate the Legislature on the reduced expense of prisons, and the diminished numbers of adult offenders, as they now do upon the improvement in morais, and absence from exposure to disgrace and punishment, of those of tender years. By order of the Board of Managers of the House of Refuge. JOHN SERGEANT, President H. R.

Attested,

JAMES J. BARCLAY, Secretary H. R.

LOSS OF WEIGHT IN COINS.

To ascertain the greatest diminution of weight which our coins will undergo and yet leave their devices and inscriptions clearly discribable, experiments have been recently made at the mint; and it is found that our dollar and its parts when reduced by attrition, so that their devices and inscriptions are not wholly obliterated, but would be entirely effaced by a slight farther diminution, lose the proportions of their respective full weights which follow:

The dollar loses five and seventy six hundredths per cent. The half dollar loses six and seventy-two hundredths per cent.

The quarter dollar loses seven and sixty-eight hun. dredths per cent.

The dime loses nine and one tenth per cent. The half, dime loses ten and one fifth per cent. When our silver coins are diminished in any degree greater than those respective rates, they are destitute of the impression of the mint; and for that reason alone, are unfit for further circulation.

From a careful examination of our own coins and those of other countries, the loss of weight sustained by our coins in ordinary use, during a period of fifty years, is estimated as follows:

The eagle loses about 1 per cent.
The half eagle loses nearly 2 per cent.
The quarter eagle loses about 3 per cent.
The dollar loses about 1 per cent.
The half dollar loses about 2 per cent.
The quarter dollar loses about 3 per cent.
The dime loses about six per cent.
The half dime loses about 10 per cent.

It is proper that our coins shall not be a legal tender when they are diminished in weight, more than one twenty-fifth part, or 4 per cent, of their full weight; and that this rule shall be applied to all the coins.

Different rates of Diminution for the different coins would be too complex, and would afford very little advantage. Under the restriction now proposed our coins diminished only by ordinary use, will be legal money during the following periods:

The eagle, about 200 years.
The half eagle, about 100 years.
The quarter eagle, about 67 years.
The dollar about 200 years.
The half dollar, about 100 years.
The quarter dollar, about 57 years.
The dime, about 33 years.

The half dime, about 20 years.

The foreign coins which are now a legal tender is the Spanish dollar and its parts. The recent coinage of Spain is limited to the dollar, few of which reach this country. Our principal supply was from South America, which has now coins of its own. Probably one half of the Spanish coins now in use here were made before 1792, when our mint was established. It is estimated that those Spanish coins now in our circulation, are at this time, less in weight, than their original full weights, by the following proportions.

The dollar, about 1 per cent.
The half dollar, about 3 per cent.

110

[blocks in formation]

The aggregate diminution of the coin now in circula- Sudden, tion is estimated at 7 per cent. Perhaps not a hundredth Syphilis, part is legal money, according to the standard prescribed for it by our laws.

Suicide,
Ulcers,
Varioloid,

Violence,

The coins of all kinds now in the United States are estimated at 23 millions of dollars; of which 14 millions Unknown, are our own coinage, and 5 millions Spanish. Whilst our early coins are fast disappearing, the Spanish con- Wounds, tinue in circulation; the former being converted into bullion, and the latter, of less value, are retained. An amount not less than 11 millions of dollars of our silver money has been withdrawn from circulation. It is indispensable to the preservation of our own coins that the Spanish should cease to be legalized. One of the advantages of their extirpation will be a uniform expression of value in the national money, to the extinction of pounds and their parts. The mint will soon be able to coin ten millions a year, or any greater sum our wants may require.

[blocks in formation]

Between

[blocks in formation]

AGES. Under 1, 1 and 2,

[blocks in formation]

2 and 5,

[blocks in formation]
[blocks in formation]

10 and 15,

[blocks in formation]

15 and 20,

[blocks in formation]

122762

20 and 30,

37

[blocks in formation]

Asthma,

Atrophy,

Burns,

Bronchitis,

Caries,

0

1

Casualties,

1

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][subsumed][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][subsumed][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed]
[ocr errors]
[blocks in formation]

Whites, 236 | Blacks, 44 From Alms-house, 36.
Males, 159; Females, 121-of whom 77 boys, 68 girls.

The past month has presented an unusual degree of health in the City and Liberties; with the exception of the Small-pox, which still prevails in the districts, we have been visited by no epidemic. The majority of the diseases have been such as are produced by the sud den vicissitudes of temperature, so prevalent at this seaBy deducting the casualties, violent and sudden deaths and the still-born, and the deaths from old agethe entire number of deaths from diseases, including 49 cases of consumption will be found to be only 235.

son.

Statement of deaths in JANUARY from 1807 to 1830,

[ocr errors]

2

[blocks in formation]
[blocks in formation]

72

192

[blocks in formation]
[blocks in formation]
[blocks in formation]
[blocks in formation]
[blocks in formation]
[blocks in formation]
[blocks in formation]

128

314

[blocks in formation]
[blocks in formation]
[blocks in formation]

129|1825 145 144

289

[blocks in formation]
[blocks in formation]

328

[blocks in formation]
[ocr errors]

43

137 131 1827

176

313

59

181 | 1828 200
157 1829 208 178
235
145
1830 135

161

361

386

280

[subsumed][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][subsumed][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][subsumed][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][subsumed][subsumed][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][subsumed][subsumed][merged small][subsumed][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][subsumed][subsumed][merged small][subsumed][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][subsumed][subsumed][merged small][subsumed][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][subsumed][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors]
[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

MISCELLANEOUS.

On liquors, groceries and queens ware per ton per mile

111

3 0

29

33

26

26

On all articles not enumerated, passing north or west, per ton per mile

4 0

24

26

19

18

21

21

[blocks in formation]
[blocks in formation]

On all articles not enumerated, passing southward and eastward, per ton per mile Explanateon.-Cattle, horses, and all other live stock, the raw hides of domestic animals, are to be considered within the term "agricultural productions" and each horse is to be estimated at 6 cwt.

On boats made and used chiefly for the transportation of property per mile

On boats used chiefly for the transportation of persons, 25 cents per mile, or ten cents per mile on the boat, and one cent per mile on each passenger over eight years of age at the election of the proprietors; Provided, They render such satisfactory accounts of the number of passengers, as may be required, and make such election when their boats commence business for the season.

On each passenger transported in freight boats, & over 12 years of age per mile

For passing the out let lock at Middletown.

1 5

20

On every loaded ark

20

Do. empty ark

2 0

Do. loaded boat

1

Do. empty boat

On pig iron and broken castings

1

On castings, blooms, and anchonies

2

On bar, rolled and slit iron

On sand, clay, earth, gravel, bleached ashes, and

[blocks in formation]
[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors]

On mineral coal

005050

412424

On wood for fuel, per cord per mile, if in boats 2 5 The same if in rafts

On tan bark per cord per mile if in boats

The same, if in rafts

On timber, square and round, if carried in boats

or scows down stream, per 100 cubic feet per mile

The same if carried in boats or scows up stream The same if carried in rafts

1

2

2

5

3

0

On boards, planks and scantling, reduced to inch measure, and all sideing lath and other sawed stuff less than one inch thick per 1000 feet per mile if conveyed in boats or scows down stream 1 The same if conveyed in boats or scows up stream 2 5 The same if conveyed in rafts

5

Lumber of all kinds in rafts or platforms, at the rate per thousand feet board measure

MISCELLANEOUS.

There are 769 students now attached to the University of Pennsylvania: of whom 394 are in the Medical Department (exclusive of 20 graduates who continue to attend the lectures,) 97 in the collegiate, 120 in the grammar, and 158 in the charity schools.-Morn. Journ.

The following are the nett balances of the fees received by the officers named in 1829, deducting expenses: Inspector of ground oak bark, $4,650

Two inspectors of domestic distilled spirits, 2,461
Inspector of salted provisions,
Inspector of butter and lard,
Inspector of Flour,

594

588

1,993

The navigation of the Delaware has continued interrupted all the week-sleds have been passing upon the ice. On Sunday afternoon, (7th inst.) a snow storm commenced, which continued during the night-on Monday morning there were about 5 or 6 inches in depth of snow upon the ground-and the sleighing continued pretty good until Thursday, (the 11th,) when a thaw commenced, which destroyed it.

DAUPHIN COUNTY. Rates and Levies for 1829.

$3,558 55

.639 69 ..732 11

.1,272 70

.631 90 .733 84

925 60

4 0

On shingles, if short, and conveyed in boats or scows down stream per 1000 per mile

0 5

Harrisburg,..

The same if long and conveyed down stream

0 71

Upper Paxton,

The same if short and conveyed in boats up stream 1

0

Middle Paxton.

The same if long and conveyed up stream

1

[blocks in formation]

The same if short and carried in rafts

[blocks in formation]

The same if long and carried in rafts

[blocks in formation]

On split posts or rails for fencing if carried in boats or scows down stream per 100 per mile

Halifax,

2 0

Susquehanna.

The same if carried in boats or scows up stream 40 The same if carried in rafts

[blocks in formation]

0

Hanover,..

..1,908 39

On staves and heading if carried in boats or scows down stream per ton per mile

The same if carried in boats up stream

The same if transported in rafts

On hoop poles and split lath per ton per mile

0 7 Swatara, lower district,.

Londonderry....

Total,......

Swatara, upper district,...

.1,495 32

1121

7500

.1,606 92

.1,935 03

$19,999 15

.1,787 56

112

MISCELLANEOUS.

[blocks in formation]

289 paupers admitted into the house during the year

1829.

simply having a copper reservoir set into the throat of a wide kitchen chimney where it is kept always full by the common apparatus of a pipe and ball, and lever.The ball on the end of the lever floats on the surface, and when any water is drawn off, the ball falling raises the other end, which fitting into the leaden conductor, admits more water till the reservoir is again filled; from the latter the heated fluid is conveyed to the kitchen, as well as to the bath house, in the first, of which it an

322 paupers, of which some eloped and some dismis-swers for all the uses of washing, scrubbing, &c. and in

sed in same year.

50 paupers died in the house during the same year.

133 paupers at present in the house."

38 out door paupers admitted during same year.

24 out door paupers died in same year.

55 out door paupers discontinued same year. 11 out door paupers at this time.

14 children bound out to trades.

1 child born in the house same year.

Statement respecting the public school established by the commissioners of Dauphin county, in pursuance of an act assembly entitled "An act authorising the commissioners of Dauphin county, to establish a public school in the borough of Harrisburg, on the Lancasterian system."

In the year ending January 5, 1829; the whole number of children taught in the said shool was two hundred and seventy eight.

The number of children taught in the said school, during the same year, whose parents, guardians or friends, have defrayed or agreed to defray any part or the whole of the expenses of their tuition, was ninety

four.

The amount received during the same year, for the tuition of children whose parents, guardians, or friends have agreed to defray the whole or any part of the expense of their tuition is forty six dollars and thirty seven cents. The amount due for the tuition of children during the same year, whose parents, guardians or friends have agreed to pay the whole or any part thereof, is one hundred and seventy seven dollars and thirty six cents. The whole amount due in three years for the tuition of children whose parents, guardians or friends have agreed to defray the whole or any part of the expenses thereof, is six hundred and fifty six dollars and ninety three cents.

It appears by the county accounts that

$728 11, were paid for the tuition of poor children. 1767 20, for building for Lancasterian School,

46 89, for articles, for ditto,

281 43, for stationary for ditto,

46 25, for coal,

800

for teacher.

New Article for a Philadelphia Parlour.

The great abundance and excellence of the Schuylkill water now distributed through thirty-six miles of iron pipe in this city and liberties, has given rise to a new article of parlour furniture. A gentleman has lately erected in his dining room a very handsome classical Japaned urn, through the top of which rises a neat silver pipe, somewhat resembling the mineral water fountains, connected in the usual manner with the hy drant mains. To make the water of an agreeable temperature for summer, the pipe is carried to the bottom of a cold well, where it is coiled in such a manner as to expose a considerable surface to the action of the well water; thus by allowing the parlour fount to run a few minutes, the water is forced from the bottom of the well, having the temperature almost of an ice house in the warmest weather. The whole is so arranged as to be extremely ornamental,the waste water being carried off through the floor to the yard. It will no doubt be imitated by others, The plan of having a perpetual warm bath is becoming quite common. It is arranged by

the latter affords the never failing luxury of a warm bath. Every house where the Schuylkill water is introduced, should possess this really economical apparatus. -Saturday Bulletin.

Account of Wheat and Rye Flour and Corn Meal inspected at Philadelphia for 1829:

Wheat Flour, 297,206 bbls.
Rye Flour, 39 523 bbls.
Corn Meal, 7,710 hhds,

Do. do, 18,888 bbls.

NOTICE. The Inspector, of Flour in office, until 16th March last, has made no official return, and that made by his successor was in such a form that an account of the different kinds and qualities of Flour cannot be had from it, nor can we give the quarterly inspections, but the above is sufficiently correct for mercantile purposes. -Price Current.

The average quantity of flour inspected for the last five years, is 539,861 1.5, of which 50,000 barrels per year come down the Susquehanna from Pennsylvania and New York. Very little of the flour received here At New York a large is inspected before it arrives.

part is inspected before it arrives.-Baltimore Paper.

A Panther, seven feet eight inches long, was shot at West Bethlehem, Pa. recently, after a chase of a mile by several citizens. It is said there is another in the vicinity.

[blocks in formation]

21.8
3

[merged small][merged small][ocr errors]

On a Canal.

On a level

On a level turn.

Railway.

pike road.

55,5000

14,400

1,800

38,542

14,400

1,800

28,316

14,400

1,800

21,680

14,400

1,800

13,875

14,400

1,800

9,635 14,400

1,800

7,030

14,400

1,800

[blocks in formation]

14,400

1,800

[blocks in formation]

14,400

1,800

3,463

14,400

1,800

1,900 14,400

1,800

10 13.5

The historical notes, from our friend in the interi or, are received, and shall appear next week. The request from Pittsburg shall be early attended to.

Printed every SATURDAY MORNING by WILLIAM F GEDDES, No. 59 Locust Street, Philadelphia; where, and at the PUBLICATION OFFICE, IN FRANKLIN PLACE, second door back of the Post Office, (back room) subscriptions will be thankfully received. Price FIVE DOLLARS per annum, payable annually by subscribers residing in or near the city, or where there is an agent. Other subscribers pay in advance.

THE

REGISTER OF PENNSYLVANIA.

DEVOTED TO THE PRESERVATION OF EVERY KIND OF USEFUL INFORMATION RESPECTING THE STATE.

VOL. V.-NO. 8.

EDITED BY SAMUEL HAZARD.

PHILADELPHIA, FEBRUARY 20, 1830. NO. 112.

HISTORICAL NOTES.

Communicated for the "Register of Pennsylvania."

January 28, 1683. Thomas Winn, Speaker of the General Assembly, ordered that the Members who absented themselves from the deliberations of the House without good cause, shall pay a fine of twelye pence sterling for every such offence.

consequently had not infringed upon their rights.1701. Jurors entitled to receive eight pence a day; witnesses two shillings each.

Philadelphia incorporated this year, by the request of the inhabitants, into a city.

1704. Arrangements made for the erection of a Court house and Prison in the city of Philadelphia.

Augnst 16. The country members lodging out of the city were unable from the violence of the wind and rain to attend their duties in the House of Assembly.

October 15. The Assembly were required to meet on Sunday. They met and organized, then adjourned to meet on Monday the 16th.

March 16, 1685. Patrick Robinson, Clerk of the Provincial Courts was required by the Assembly to appear before them with the Records of the Court, but refusing compliance he was taken into custody by order of the House for refusal to obey the commands of the House, and voted incapable of exercising the duties of any pub-ness in the spring. lic office thereafter.

Nicholas Moore for contempt of the authority of the House was expelled.

1689. March 13. John White informed the Governor that he was unable to attend to his duty as a Member of Assembly, being in prison at New Castle. The fact being made known to the Assembly, they commanded the Sheriff to place John White at freedom. John White took his seat in the House, on the 17th; but on that night John Claypoole, Sheriff, broke open the door of the chamber when John White was preparing to go to bed, and carried him off to confinement.

1694. March 23. David Jamison informed the House of Assembly, that the Five Nations of Indians had been corrupted by the French, and had withdrawn their friendship for Pennsylvania.

1705. The city of Philadelphia was visited by sick

William Biles, Member of the House, complained of a breach of privilege. The House censured the Sheriff and Judges, who committed the same.

An attempt was made this year to make the qualifica tions for electors fifty pounds in value.

1706. The wolves had increased in such a degree as to cause an apprehension for the safety of all the flocks of sheep in the immediate vicinity of Philadel phia. A communication on the subject was made to the Governor and Assembly.

The Slaughter houses in the centre of population in the city of Philadelphia, became such a nuisance that they were ordered to be removed.

1706. James Logan laid before the General Assembly an interesting account of the Indians at Conestoga. 1707. The House of Assembly requested the Gov1694. The Speaker informed the House of Assem-ernor that he would not employ any longer James Lebly that the King's Attorney, in London, expected to tort and Nicholas as Indian Interpreters, as they ought to receive from them the sum of twenty guineas for read- be considered very dangerous persons. ing the several laws transmitted to the King and Council in London.

NOTE.When the Members of the General Assembly first met in the city of Philadelphia, they hired a room and paid the expense. The country members took lodgings out of the city, and walked in to attend the meeting, frequently bringing their dinners with them. 1695. July 9. The House of Assembly met at Sarah Whitpain's room, and each member agreed to pay their proportion, and charge it to the respective county. July 10. Judges allowed ten shilling a day for their

services.

July 25. John Claypoole presented to the Governor by the House of Assembly, as a man of Ill Fame; and that he be removed from office.

1698. March 13. William Morton sent a message to the House of Assembly, that he was a Scotchman, and he was apprehensive if he came to Philadelphia to take his seat as a Member, they would not receive him, and therefore he thought it prudent to remain at home.

1701. In this year complaint was made to the Gover nor and House of Assembly, by the freemen of Philadelphia, stating that the Proprietary had encroached up on their rights that he had rented out part of the land which was intended to be a common for ever; and requesting that the landing places at the Blue Anchor and the Penny pot house should be made free for the use of any man without hindrance. The answer of the Proprietary was, that he had made a re-aplotment of the city, with which the first purchasers had complied, and VOL. V.

15

In the year 1705, Solomon Cresson, a Constable of the

city of Philadelphia, going his rounds at one o'clock at night, and discovering a very riotous assembly in a tav ern, immediately ordered them to disperse, when John Evans, Esq. Governor of the Province, happened to be one of them, and called Solomon in the house and flogged him very severely,& had him imprisoned for 2 days. the Five Nations to come and pay their annual tribute; 1709. The Indians at Conestoga were required by but they sent word they could not go until they obtained permission of the Governor of the Province.

The Assembly accordingly granted the money, as al· so charges for the journey.

1712. William Southbe applied to the Assembly for a law for the declaration of freedom to all negroes. The House resolved-"It is neither just or convenient to set them at liberty."

1713. A committee of the Assembly were sent to Governor Gookin on business. They returned and reported "that the Governor is not stirring." See Votes of Assembly, vol. II, page 144.

1715. Mr. Asheton called on the House of Assembly with a message from the Governor, and was introduced into the room and addressed the Speaker as follows:"The Governor has requested me to state his regret that he has been unable to get the Council together, and will feel happy if the Speaker and Members wait on him this evening at Sarah Radcliff's, and take a glass of wine with him."

The Ilouse soon after adjourned, and waited on the Governor in the evening.

[ocr errors]
« AnteriorContinuar »