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Wherein haye I so deserved of you,
That you extol me thus ?

Lucio. 'Faith, my Lord, I spoke it but according to the trick: If you will hang me for it, you may, but I had rather it would please you, I might be whip'd.

Duke. Whip'd first, Sir, and hang'd: after. · Proclaim it, provost, round about the city; If any woman's wrong'd by this lewd fellow, (As I have heard him swear himself, there's one Whom he begot with child,) let her appear, And he shall marry her: the nuptial finish'd, Let him be whip'd and hang'd.

Lucio. I beseech your Highness, do not marry. me to a whore! Your Highness said even now, 1 made you a Duke; good my Lord, do not recompence me, in making me a cuckold. Duke. Upon mine honour, thou shalt marry

her. Thy slanders I forgive; and therewithal Remit thy other forfeits : Take him to prison : And see our pleasure herein executed.

Lucio. Marrying a punk, my Lord, is pressing to death, whipping, and hanging.

Duke. Sland'ring & Prince deserves it. She, Claudio, that you wrongd, look you re

store. Joy to you, Mariana! love her, Angelo;

I have confess'd her, and I know her virtue. : Thanks, good friend Escalus, for thy much good

ness:

There's more behind, that is more gratulaté. —
Thanks, Provost, for thy care, and secrecy;
We shall employ :hee in a worthier place: 1,
Forgive him, Angelo, that brought you home
The head of Ragozin for Claudio's;

The offence pardons itself. Dear Isabel,
I have a motion much imports your good;
Whereto if you'll a willing ear incline,
What's mine is yours,

and what is yours is

mine: So, bring us to our palace; where we'll show What's yet behind, that's meet you all should

know.

[Exeunt.

1

A
SELECTION

OF THE

MOST IMPORTANT NOTES

EXTRACTED

FROM

THE BEST COMMENTATORS

TO THE PLAY'S

OF

WILLIAM SHAKSPEARE.

VOLUME II.

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NOTES TO TWELFTH - NIGHT:

OR,
WHAT YOU WILL.

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** TWELFTH · Night.] There is great reason to believe, that the serious part of this Comedy is founded on some old translation of the seventh history in the fourth volume of Belleforest's His. toires Tragiques. Belleforest took the story, as usual, from Bandello. The comic scenes appear to have been entirely the production of Shukspeare. It is not impossible, however, that the circum: stances of the Duke sending his Page to plead his cause with the Lady, and of the Lady's falling in love with the Page, ete. might be borrowed from the Fifth Eglog of Barnaby Cooge, published with his other original Poems in 1563:

A worthy Knyght dyd love her longo

„And for her sakc dyd fcale
„The panges of love, that happen styl

„By frowning for nue's wheale.
„He had a Page, Valerius named,

„Whom so muche he dyd truste, „That all the secrets of his hart

„To hym declare he muste.

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