Daniel Boone: Wilderness Scout

Capa
Cosimo, Inc., 01/11/2005 - 372 páginas
Promptly at the end of three days of fasting Boone knew that the war party would set forth no matter what the weather. It was a bad omen otherwise. In single file, at spaced intervals, the painted warriors would move from the town, firing their rifles slowly one after the other... -from Chapter XIV This semifictionalized biography of the legendary frontiersman, first published in 1921, rings with desperate dialogue ("We'll be caught if we stay here... the Indians are not far behind us") and gung-ho wilderness adventure. From Boone's childhood along the banks of the Delaware River-full of escapades "any normal and healthy boy would have revelled in"-to his cantankerous old age, in which he chafed to go further west to escape the encroachment of civilization into his beloved Kentucky, this is a highly entertaining life of the man who was never lost, but was "bewildered once for three days." American writer STEWART EDWARD WHITE (1873-1946) wrote of his own wilderness adventures in The Claim Jumpers (1901) and The Blazed Trail (1902). His historical novels include Gold (1913), The Gray Dawn (1915), and The Rose Dawn (1920).

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Índice

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IV
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290

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Palavras e frases frequentes

Passagens conhecidas

Página 131 - I appeal to any white man to say, if ever he entered Logan's cabin hungry, and he gave him not meat; if ever he came cold and naked, and he clothed him not. During the course of the last long and bloody war, Logan remained idle in his cabin, an advocate for peace. Such was my love for the Whites, that my countrymen pointed as they passed, and said, ' Logan is the friend of white men.
Página 132 - There runs not a drop of my blood in the veins of any living creature. This called on me for revenge. I have sought it : I have killed many : I have fully glutted my vengeance. For my country I rejoice at the beams of peace. But do not harbor a thought that mine is the joy of fear.
Página 114 - What did you kill my people on Yellow Creek for ? The white people killed my kin, at Conestoga, a great while ago ; and I thought nothing of that. But you killed my kin again, on Yellow Creek, and took my Cousin prisoner. Then I thought I must kill too ; and I have been three times to war since ; but the Indians are not angry : only myself.
Página 137 - My footsteps have often been marked with blood, and therefore I can truly subscribe to its original name. Two darling...
Página 133 - ... them while in their families, accompanied with other presents, and all the marks of the most sincere and tender affection. Nay, they...
Página 185 - Shawanese king took great notice of me, and treated me with profound respect, and entire friendship, often entrusting me to hunt at my liberty. I frequently returned with the spoils of the woods, and as often presented some of what I had taken to him, expressive of duty to my sovereign.
Página 103 - This dense forest was to the Indians a home in which they had lived from childhood, and where they were as much at ease as a farmer on his own acres. To their keen eyes, trained for generations to more than a wild beast's watchfulness, the wilderness was an open book: nothing at rest or in motion escaped - , them. They had begun to track game as soon as they could walk; a scrape on a tree trunk, a bruised leaf, a faint indentation of the soil, which the eye of no white man could see, — all told...

Acerca do autor (2005)

Author Stewart Edward White was born in Grand Rapids, Michigan on March 12, 1873. He received a degree in Philosophy from the University of Michigan in 1895 and a M. A. from Columbia University in 1903. He wrote numerous books, articles, and short stories about his experiences in mining and lumber camps and on exploration trips. Some of his best known novels include The Claim Jumpers, The Blazed Trail, Gold, The Gray Dawn, and The Rose Dawn. He died in San Francisco, California on September 18, 1946.

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