Crisis, and National Co-operative Trades' Union Gazette, Volumes 1-2

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Greenwood Reprint Corporation, 1833
 

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Página 69 - But Knowledge to their eyes her ample page, Rich with the spoils of Time, did ne'er unroll ; Chill Penury repressed their noble rage, And froze the genial current of the soul.
Página 60 - Britain's isle, no matter where, An ancient pile of building stands ; The Huntingdons and Hattons there Employ'd the power of fairy hands To raise the ceiling's fretted height, Each pannel in achievements clothing, Rich windows that exclude the light, And passages, that lead to nothing.
Página 70 - ... let them see it who saw their brothers and their sons fall on the field of Bunker Hill and in the streets...
Página 52 - The cloud-capt towers, the gorgeous palaces, The solemn temples, the great globe itself; * Yea, all which it inherit, shall dissolve, And, like the baseless fabric of a vision, Leave not a wreck behind.
Página 32 - It will give a cheap and quick conveyance to the merchandise on the Mississippi, Missouri, and other great rivers, which are now laying open their treasures to the enterprise of our countrymen ; and although the prospect of personal emolument has been some inducement to me, yet I feel infinitely more pleasure in reflecting on the immense advantage that my country will derive from the invention.
Página 166 - Tis thou, thrice sweet and gracious goddess, addressing myself to LIBERTY, whom all in public or in private worship, whose taste is grateful, and ever will be so, till NATURE herself shall change no tint of words can spot thy snowy mantle...
Página 44 - ... keeper of the great seal, as guardian of his majesty's conscience, as lord high chancellor of England, nay, even in that character alone in which the noble duke would think it an affront to be considered...
Página 44 - No one venerates the peerage more than I do ; — but, my lords, I must say, that the peerage solicited me, not I the peerage. Nay more, I can say, and will say, that as a peer of parliament, as speaker of this right...
Página 36 - MAN, as the minister and interpreter of nature, does and understands as much as his observations on the order of nature, either with regard to things or the mind, permit him, and neither knows nor is capable of more.
Página 123 - Distinctions in society will always exist under every just government. Equality of talents, of education, or of wealth can not be produced by human institutions. In the full enjoyment of the gifts of Heaven and the fruits of superior industry, economy, and virtue, every man is equally entitled to protection by law...

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