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TEMORA:

AN EPIC POEM.

Vultis et his mecum paritur considere regnis, Urbem quam statuo, vestra est.

VIRGIL.

BOOK I.

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TO THE

FIRST EDITION,

THE poem

that stands first in this collection had its name from Temora, the royal palace of the first Irish kings of the Caledonian race, in the province of Ulster.

ARGUMENT.

CAIRBAR, the son of Borbar-duthal, lord of Atha in Con

naught, the most potent chief of the race of Firbolg, having murdered, at Temora the royal palace, Cormac the son of Artho, the young king of Ireland, usurped the throne. Cormac was lineally descended from Conar the son of Trenmor, the great grandfather of Fingal, king of those Caledonians who inhabited the western coast of Scotland. Fingal resented the behaviour of Cairbar, and resolved to pass over into Ireland, with an army, to re-establish the royal family on the Irish throne. Early intelligence of his designs coming to Cairbar, he assembled some of his tribes in Ulster, and at the same time ordered his brother Cathmor to follow him speedily with an army, from Temora. Such was the situation of affairs when the Caledonian invaders appeared on the

coast of Ulster. The poem opens in the morning. Cairbar is represented as

retired from the rest of the army, when one of his scouts brought him news of the landing of Fingal. He assembles a council of his chiefs. Foldath the chief of Moma haughtily despises the enemy; and is reprimanded warmly by Malthos. Cairbar, after hearing their debate, orders a feast to be prepared, to which, by his bard Olla, he invites Oscar the son of Ossian ; resolving to pick a quarrel with that hero, and so

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