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The rocks, the plains, the woods, the pleasing scenes
Where he and young Philætes raptured, pray'd,
And talked of virtue, echo to his moan.
Sleep'st thou for ever, O my darling friend !
My other self! has death for ever seald
The friendly eye, and bound Philates' tongue ?
Ah me! no parting look has blest thy friend,
No token of our spotless friendship left ;.
From me removed, you breathed the spotless soul,
Now I, alone, unfriended, sad, forlorn,
Must mourn your absence in this vale of tears,
Till death, with sable hand, shall quench this pain,
And still the dire commotions of the breast.

He said—'twas night, and solemn silence reign'd
Throughout the plain; no voice, no sound is heard,
But now and then the breathing breezes sigh
Through the half-quivering leaves, and, far removed,
The sea rolls feeble murmurs to the shore;
The birds hang, sleeping, on the bending sprigs,
And setting Luna gave a silver gleam,

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THE HUNTER:

A POEM.

IN TEN CANTOS.

THE HUNTER:

A POEM".

CANTO I.

Once

on a time, when Liberty was seen
To sport and revel on the northern plain,
Immortal fair ! and was supremely kind
On Scotia's hills to snuff the northern wind;
There lived a youth, and Donald was his name.
To chace the flying stag his highest aim;
A gun, a plaid, a dog, his humble store ;
In these thrice happy, as he wants no more.

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* This poem, which has no name in the MS., I have entitled the HUNTER, to distinguish it from the HIGHLANDER, of which, perhaps, it is the first rough and imperfect draught. Though rude, and in many passages quite Judicrous, it is curious, as the first epic production of the father of Ossian; marked with his national and political prejudices, and with the wild and vivid imagery of his poetical prose. It is particularly observable, that his early genius for heroic poesy led him, even in the preceding poem upon Death, to the description of battles and single combats, and to a careful selection of the choicest similes, which appear as conspicuous, in the midst of an insipid narrative, as those projecting passages in an extemporary speech, of which a few well-turned periods had been previously composed. VOL. II.

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