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0. Dewey, 256

91. The World, the Mirror of the Mind,

.R. H. Dana, 258

92. The Convict Ship,

T. K. Herrey, 260

93. The Evils of Ignorance,

Watson, 261

94. The Student, ......

263

95. Valley of the Jordan and Dead Seag... French of Chateaubriand, 266

96. Elijah's Interview,

268

97. Eulogy on the Lives of Adams and Jefferson,

. Story, 269

Sequel to the Same,

Webster, 272

98. The Gray Forest Eagle,

A. B. Sireet, 273

99. Insignificance of the Earth,

Chalmers, 275

100. A Name in the Sand, .

H. F. Gould, 278

101. Happiness,...

Pollok, 279

102. Analogy between the Decay of Nature and of Man,. . Alison, 281

103. Re-union of Friends, ..

Montgomery, 283

104. God, the True Object of Confidence,.

Greenwood, 284

105. Hymn to the Creator, ..

Rowe, 287

106. Advice to a Young Lawyer,

Story, 288

107. The Discoveries of Geology Consistent with the Spirit of

Religion,

. Everett, 289

108. The Andes,

Hines, 291

109. Address to the Condor,

Mrs. Ellett, 292

110. Perceptions of the Beautiful,

Mrs. Sigourney, 293

Bounties of Nature,

295

111. Pleasures Derived from the Beauty of Nature,. Dwight, 295

Poetry on the same,

..Mrs. Hemans, 296

112. The Mammoth Cave, .

Geo. D. Prentice, 296

113. Mental Improvement, a Progressive Work, Ira Harris, 299

114. Life and Death Contrasted, ..

Young, 302

115. Veneration for the Tomb, a Proof of the Soul's

Immortality,

Chateaubriand, 304

The Consolations of Death,...

John Foster, 305

The Dying Christian to his Soul,.

. Pope, 305
Melville, 354

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116. Indian Mode of Killing the Buffalo,..

George Catlin, 30G

117. Indian Mode of Killing the Buffalo, --continued, do. 308

118. The White Rose of Miami,...... Mrs. E. L. Schermerhorn, 311

119. Remorse of Conscience; or, Catiline,...

Croly, 312

120. An Appeal to the Patriotism of South Carolina,.. . A. Jackson, 318

Land of our Birth, ..

321

121. Christ in the Tempest,

..J. G. Whittier, 322

122. The Pauper's Death Bed,

Mrs. Soulhey, 323

123. Public Announcement of the Death of John Quincy

Adams,...

...R. C. Winthrop, 324

124. Eulogy on the Life and Services of John Quincy

Adams,

..Holmes, 326

125. What is Life ?.

.John Clark, 329

126. Farewell of the Soul to the Body,

Mrs. Sigourney, 330

127. Examples of American Patriotism,..

Everelt, 332

Influence of the Present, on the Future Destiny of our

Country,..

Gulian C. Verplanck, 333

128. Freedom's Song,

..C. W. Sanders, 334

129. The Star in the West,

Eliza Cook, 335

130. Plea for Ireland, ..

Philips, 336

131. Moral Culture,

338

Admonition to the Young,

S. S. Randall, 340

Sequel to the Same, .

341

132. Ruins of Pompeii,.

341

133. Destruction of Pompeii,.

Macaulay, 312

134. Destruction of Pompeii, -Continued,.

do. 346

135. Universal Providence of God,.

Melville, 349

136. Elegant Extracts, ....

351

Varied Changes of Creation,

Young: 351

Result of Procrastination, .

Long fellow, 352

Divine Compassion, :

Cowper, 352

Nature's Loveliness,

Chalmers, 352

Vice....

Pope, 353

Value of the Soul,.

353

Mercy,

Shakspeare, 353

The Poor Cared for,

Long-Suffering,

Lope de Vega, 351

Improvement,

Campbell, 354

137. The Printing Press,

. Cumming, 355

Sequel to the Same,.

H. Greeley, 350

138. Modern Greece,

Byron, 357

139. Character of La Fayette,..

J. T. Headley, 358

140. La Fayette's last Visit to America,

do. 361

Welcome to General La Fayette,

Everett, 363
.Addison, 418

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401

165. Consolations of Immortality, .

Robert Montgomery, 419

166. Europe and America Contrasted, .

Webster, 120

167. The Beauty of the Scene enhances the Beauty of the

Deed,...

R. W. Emcrson, 422

168. Address of Leonidas,.

Richard Glover, 424

169. Soliloquy of the Dying Alchemist,.

N. P. Willis, 425

170. Duties of American Citizens,

Wayland, 429

171. Duties of American Citizens, -Continued,.

edo. 432

172. The Value of Time,....

Young, 436

173. Advertisement of a Lost Day,.

Mrs. Sigourney, 438

174. Eulogy on Noah Webster,

Chancellor Kent, 439

175. The Uscs of History,.

W. Irving, 440

True Fame,...

Jay, 441

176. Manifest Presence of the Deity,.

R. Montgomery, 442

177. Intellectual and Moral Power,

E. L. Magoon, 444

The Light of the Gospel,...

.Hoffman, 447

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NOTE.-The student will find it advantageous to determine
the inflection and modulation of the voice, which the reading
or speaking of a passage requires, from the sense ; and after-
ward to denote the same by the use of the foregoing notation,
as well as to designate, in the usual manner, the emphatic
words and sentences. This exercise will lead the mind to per-
ceive the various intonations of voice, in which natural read-
ing or speaking consists.

* Some of these signs are the same as used in Porter's Rhetorical works

THE

SCHOOL READER.

FIFTH BOOK.

PART FIRST.

RHETORICAL PRINCIPLES,

“False Eloquence, like the prismatic glass,
Its gaudy colors spreads in every place;
The face of Nature we no more survey,
All glares alike, without distinction gay;
But True Expression, like th' unchanging sun,
Clears and improves whate'er it shines upon;
It gilds all objects, but it alters none."

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1. ELOCUTION is vocal Nature. Her speech is ever distinct, varied, and expressive-ever eloquent. Every sentiment and emotion of the soul, as fear, surprise, love, anger, she expresses in her own appropriate style. The lively expressions of youth, in their ordinary pastimes, are but the spontaneous language which Nature utters. To elucidate Nature's modes of expression, to develop the powers of the voice, and to acquire skill in its management, in conformity with her established laws, are the leading objects of Elocutionary Science. Its design is not, as is too often supposed, to establish certain imaginary and arbitrary rules, by which the voice is to be regulated, but to explain those natural laws, in which natural reading or speaking consists.

2. Though the human voice, in its natural state, is rich in “sweet sounds;" yet, like every other faculty, by proper dis

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