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We must of force dispense with 'this decree:

She 'must stay here on mere 'necessity.
Biron. Necessity will make us 'all forsworn :

If I break faith, 'this word shall speak" for me,
I am forsworn, on mere “necessity.”-
So, to the laws at large, I write my name; [he paper the

And he that 'breaks them in the least degree,
Stands in attainder of eternal shame!

Suggestions are to others as to me;
But, I believe, although I seem so loath,
I am the 'last that will last 'keep his oath.

But is there no quicke 'recreation granted ?
King. Ay!'that there 'is. Our Court, you know, is haunted

With a refinéd traveller of Spain ;
A man in all the world's new fashion planted,

That hath a 'mint' of phrases in his brain;
ne, whom the music of his own vain tongue

Doth ravish, like enchanting harmony:
A man of 'compliments," whom Right and Wrong

Have chose as 'umpire of their mutiny:
This child of Fancy, (that Armado hight,')

For interim to our studies, shall relate,
In high-born words, the worth of many a knight

From tawny Spain, lost in the 'world's debate.
How 'you delight, my lords, I know not, I;
But, I protest, 'I love to hear him lie,

And I will use him for 'my minstrelsy.
Biron. Armado is a most illustrious wight,

A man of fire-new words, fashion's own knight! Long. Costard the swain, and he, shall be our sport;

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And 'so to study, three years are but short. The royal proclamation, “ that no woman shall come within a mile of the court,” has been already broken by the country bumpkin just named-Costard, a talkative Clown, who had been “ confabulating " with Jaquenetta, a pretty country wench. Dull, the parish Constable, now brings Costard, in custody, before the King, and charges him with this new, if not notable, offence. The “dull” Constable has first to deliver an explanatory letter from the Spanish Knight: Dull. Which is the Duke's 'own person? I myself 'repre

hend" his own person, for I am his grace's tharbor* 0, R. lie. b O. R. breake, o fear of being convicted. d temptations. e lively, merry. f a heap (a whole coinage). &0. R. who. h ceremonial forms of speech. i named, called.

kliterary conferences. Inewly coined (brand new). m represent.

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jinterval for amusement.

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ougho: but I would see his 'own person, in flesh and

blood. Biron. This is he. Dull. (kneeling.) . . . Signior Arm-Arm-commends you. There's villainy abroad : ... this letter will tell you more.

Costard, the prisoner, comes forward : Cost. Sir, the contempts thereof are as touching 'me. King. A letter from the magnificent Armado ! Cosť. The matter is to 'me, sir, as concerning Jaquenetta. King. (Reads.) “Great deputy, the welkin's vice-gerent, and

sole dominator of Navarre, my soul's earth's deity, and body's fostering patron; -besieged with sable-coloured melancholy, I did commend the black-oppressing humour to the most wholesome physic of thy health-giving air; and, as I am a gentleman, betook myself to walk. 7/ Time 'When ? About the 'sixth hour, when beasts.most graze, birds best peck, and men sit down to that nourishment which is called supper. Now for the Ground 'Which; which, I mean, I walked upon: it is yclepede thy Park. Then for the Place 'Where; where, I mean, I did encounter that most preposterous event, that draweth from my snow-white pen the eboncoloured ink, which here thou viewest, beholdest, surveyest, or seest. But to the Place 'Where;—it standeth north-north-east and by east, from the west corner of thy curious-knotted garden: there did I see that lowspirited swain, that base minnow of thy mirth,

Costard interrupts : Cost. Me. King.--"that unlettered small-knowing soul," Cost. Me. King.--" that shallow vassal, Cost. Still me. King.-" which, as I remember, hight Costard," Cost. O, me! King.-" sorted, and con-sorted, (contrary to thy established

proclaimed edict and continent canon,) with-withO! withbut with this I passion to say wherewith, with a child of our grandmother Eve, a female; or,

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for thy more sweet understanding, a woman. Him I a third-borough (a petty constable).

c the sky's (the heaven's). a deputy

frestraining law.

b for contents. e named.

h am moved to anger.

60. R. which with.

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(as my ever-esteemed duty urges me on) have sent to thee, to receive the meed of punishment, by thy sweet Grace's officer, Antony Dull;—a man of good repute, carriage, bearing, and estimation."

Dull comes forward ; Dull. 'Me, an 't shall please you: 'I am Antony Dull. King.--"For Jaquenetta (so is the weaker vessel called),

which I apprehended with the aforesail swain, I keep her as a vessel of thy law's fury; and shall, at the least of thy sweet notice, bring her to trial. Thine, in all compliments of devoted and heart-burning heat of duty, Don ADRIANO DE ARMADO." Sirrah, [cost] what

say 'you to this? Did you hear the proclamation ? Cost. I do confess much of the 'hearing it, but little of

the 'marking of it. King. Sir, I will pronounce your 'sentence :-you shall

fast a week, with bran and water. Cost. I had rather pray a 'month, with mutton and

porridge.
Ring. And Don Armádo, sir,“ shall be your keeper.-

My Lord Birón, see him delivered o'er :
And go we, lords, to put in practice, that
Which each to other bath so strongly sworn. [long and bums

Birón jeeringly says:
Biron. I 'll lay my'head to any good man's 'hat,

These oaths and laws will prove an idle 'scorn.

Sirrah Costard,a come on. Cost. I suffer for the truth, sir, and therefore, Welcome

the sour cup of prosperity! Affliction may one day smile again; and, till then, “Sit thee down, Sorrow!

(Exeunt. This bombastic Spaniard,—whose letter we have heard, and to whose custody poor Costard has been committed,-is one of the gentlemen who had joined the merry band of the young recluses. He had been specially chosen by the King on account of his fantastic peculiarities-especially with regard to his mode of speaking, because he had a mint of phrases in his brain, and was ever captivated with the music of his own vain tongue. His dramatic godfather had baptized him Don Adriano de Armado-perhaps with reference to another braggadocia (the “ Invincible Spanish Armada ") which, a few years earlier (1588,) had terrorized England.

The grandiloquent Don Armado, followed by Moth, his diminutive Page, now approaches. a inserted word.

ban old proverb.

Exeunt King,

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Arm. Boy, what sign is it when a man of great spirit

grows 'melancholy? Moth. A 'great sign, sir, that he will look 'sad. Arm. Why, sadness is one and the selfsame thing, dear

imp. How canst thou 'part sadness and melancholy,

my tender Juvenal ?c Moth. By a familiar demonstration of the working, my

tough Senior. Arm. Why 'tough Senior? why tough Senior ? Moth. Why tender Juvenal? why tender Juvenal ? Arm. I spoke it, tender Juvenal, as a congruent epitheton,"

appertaining to thy 'young days,—which we may nom

inate 'tender. Moth. And I, tough Senior, as an appertinent title to your

'old time,—which we may name 'tough. Arm. Thou art quick in answers. I will confess, I am in

'love; and, as it is base for a 'soldier to love, so am I in love with a base 'wench. Boy, I do love that coun. try girl, that I took in the park with the irrationale

hind Costard : 'she deserves well! Moth. [Aside.) To be whipped; and yet a better love than my

master. Dull the Constable here returns with his prisoners Costard and the smiling Jaquenetta, and addresses the enamoured Don Armado: Dull. Sir, the Duke's pleasure is, that 'you keep Costard

safe: and you must let him take no delight, nor_no penance; but he must fast three days a week. For this 'damsel, 'I must keep 'her at the Park; she is

allowed for the 'day-woman.' Fare you well. Arm. [Aside.) I do betray myself with blushing.-Maid ? Jaq. Man?

I will visit thee—at the lodge.
Jaq. That 's hereby.s
Arm. I'know where it is situate.
Jaq. Law! how wise you are !
Arm. I will tell thee 'wonders. I love thee!
Jaq. So I 'heard you say.
Arm. And so, farewell.
Jaq. Fair weather after you!

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Constable Dull officiously interposes:
Dull. Come, Jaquenetta, away!
0. R. (throughout the scene) Brag for Braggart.
young person, youth.

d guitable epithet.
f appointed for the dairy-woman. & as it may happen.

Arm....

ba little trickster.

e 0. R. rationall. (Exit.

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While the pretty Jaquenetta, smiling kindly to both her lovers, is taken to her new employment by the surly Constable Dull, the grandiloquent Armado angrily says to his more successful rival, Costard : Arm. Villain! thou 'shalt fast for thy offences ere thou be

pardoned ! Cost. Well, sir, I hope, 'when I do it, I shall do it on a 'full

stomach. Arm. Thou shalt be 'heavily punished ! Cost. 'I am more bound to you than your 'fellows; for

'they are but lightly rewarded. Arm. Take away this villain ; shut him up!

Little Moth struts up to Costard: Moth. Come, you transgressing slave; away! Cost. Let me not be pent 'up, sir: I will fast, being 'loose. Moth. No, sir; that were fast-'and-loose : thou shalt to

'prison ! Cost. Well, if ever I do see the merry days of desolation

that I 'have seen, that some 'shall see Moth. 'What shall some see? Cost. Nay, nothing, Master Moth, but what they 'look upon.

It is not for prisoners to be too silent in their words ;
and therefore I will say 'nothing: I thank goodness I
have as little patience as 'another man; and therefore
'I can be 'quiet.

(and The Don is left alone to his loving meditation : Arm. I do affect the very ground, (which is base,) where

her shoe, (which is baser,) guided by her foot, (which is basest,) doth tread. I shall be 'forsworn, (which is a great argument of 'falsehood) 'if I love. And how can that be 'true love, which is 'falsely attempted ? Love is a 'familiar ;Love is a 'devil: there is no 'evil angel but Love. Cupid's butt-shafto is too hard for Hercules'd club; and therefore too much odds for a Spaniard's rapier: the passado he respects not, the duello he regards not: his disgrace is to be called 'boy; but his glory is to subdue 'men. Adieu, valour! rust, rapier! be still, drum! for your manager is in love! yea, he loveth! Assist me some extemporal god of rhyme, for I am sure I shall turn sonnet-maker.' Devise, wit,—write, pen ; for I am for whole volumesin folio!

CEx. Moth Land Cost.

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love. ba spirit supposed to come at call. carrow

d the deified hero who, as the first of his "Twelve Labours," with his club killed the Nemæan lion. • terms in fencing.

10. R, sonnet.

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