Imagens das páginas
PDF
ePub

BULLETIN PUBLIC

OF

CIVIL GOVERNMENT

FOR COMMON SCHOOLS.

INTENDED FOR

PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

IN THE

STATE OF NEW YORK.

TO WHICH ARE APPENDED THE CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK
AS AMENDED AT THE ELECTION OF 1888, THE CONSTITUTION
OF THE UNITED STATES, THE DECLARATION OF

INDEPENDENCE, ETC., ETC.

BY

HENRY C. NORTHAM,

CONDUCTOR OF TEACHERS' INSTITUTES.

Eightieth Edition, largely from New Plates.

[graphic]

ооно-

SYRACUSE, N. Y. :
CW. BARDEEN, PUBLISHER.

Copyright, 1877, 1880, 1886, 1889, by H. C. NORTHAX.

KAKVA *D COLLEGE LIARAT

BY EXCHANGE FROM
NEW YORK 3TATE LIBRARY

FC 26 1932
- THE SCHOOL BULLETIN PUBLICATIONS.

28.90.619

Instruction in Citizenship.

1. Civil Government for Common Schools, prepared as a manual for public instruction in the State of New York.' Io which are appended the Constitution of the State of New York as amended at the election of 1882, the Constitution of the United States, and the Declaration of Independence, etc., etc. By HENRY C. NORTHAM. 16mo, cloth, pp. 185. 75 cts.

Is it that this book was made because the times demanded it, or that the publication of a book which made the teaching of Civil Government practi. cable led to a general desire that it should be taught? Certain it is that this subject, formerly regarded as a “finishing” branch in the high school, is now found on every teacher's examination-paper, and is commonly taught in district schools. Equally certain is it that in the State of New York this text-book is used more than all others combined.

2. A Chart of Civi? Government. By CHARLES T. POOLER. Sheets 12x18, 5 cts. The same folded, in cl covers, 25 cts.

Schools using Northari': Civil Government will find this chart of great use, and those not yet ready to introduce a text-book will be able to give no little valuable instruction by the charts alone. Some commissioners have purchased them by the hundred and presented one to every school house in the county.

3. Handbook for School Teachers and Trustees. A manual of School Law for School Officers, Teachers and Parents in the State of New York. By HERBERT BROWNELL. 16mo, leatherette. pp. 64. 35 cts.

This is a specification of the general subject, presenting clearly, definitely, and with references, important ouestions of School Law. Particular attention is called to the chapters treating of schools under visitation of the Regents-a topic upon which definite information is often sought for in vain.

4. Common School Law for Common School Teachers. A digest of the provisions of statute and common law as to the relations of the Teacher to the Pupil, the Parent, and the District. With 500 references to legal decis. ions in 28 different States. 14th edition, wholly re-written, with references to the new Code of 1888. By C. W. BARDEEN. 16mo, cloth, pp. 120.75 cts.

This has been since 1875 the standard authority upon the teacher's relations, and is frequently quoted in legal decisions. The new edition much more complete than its predecessors, containing Topical Table of Contents, and a minute Index.

5. Laws of New York relating to Common Schools, with comments and instructions, and a digest of decisions. 8vo, leather, pp. 867. $4.00.

This is what is known as “The New Code of 1888," and contains all revisions of the State school-law to date.

6. The Powers and Duties of Officers and Teachers. By ALBERT P. MARBLE. 16mo, paper, pp. 27. 15 cts.

A vigorous presentation in Sup't Marble's pungent style of tendencies as well as facts.

7. First Principles of Political Economy. By JOSEPH ALDEN. 16mo, cloth, pp. 153. 75 cts.

Ex-President Andrew D. White says of this book : “It is clear, well arranged, and the best treatise for the purpose I have ever seen."

C. W, BARDEEN, Publisher, Syracuse, N. Y.

[ocr errors]

PREFACE TO THIRD EDITION.

Instruction in Civil Government should be both theoretical and practical. Unfortunately the text-books in general use stop with the theory.

They deal with the science of government, but, being intended for use throughout the United States, they give no information as to the art of government as practised in this State.

Our students learn what is the guaranty of Republican government, but not how that government is exercised in their own town.

They are drilled in Incorporeal Hereditaments, but do not learn what kind of causes can be tried before a Justice of the Peace.

To supply this deficiency is the aim of the present manual. Beginning with the School District, the names, manner of election, duties, and salaries are given of all important officers from the school trustee to the President of the United States.

The rapid sale of the First and Second Editions of this book encourages the hope that, with the additions now made, this manual may be considered indispensable in every progressive school in the State of New York.

HENRY C. NORTHAM. LOWVILLE, April 22, 1878.

2.

PREFACE TO FORTY-FIRST EDITION.

This revised and enlarged manual of Civil Government, containing a concise treatment of the School District, Town, City, County, State, and National Goyernments, is now offered to the schools of the State of New York, in the belief that a clear understanding of the science and art of government can be obtained therefrom; and that the subject of government can be made as interesting as any subject that is taught in our schools. In days like these, no person can afford to grow into manhood and womanhood without a knowledge of the workings of our government.

Aside from its value as a text-book, this manual will be found of value in every house for reference.

More than once copies of previous editions have been purchased for every member of the Legislature, and lawyers have come to regard it as a book to be within reach on every desk. Should not every voter have at have at hand the information it contains?

Let Civil Government be the handmaid of History, and a clear understanding of both will fit our boys and girls to hold as dear as their heart's blood the welfare, honor, and perpetuity of “The noblest land the sun ever shone upon,” Our Country first, last, and always."

HENRY C. NORTHAM. LOWVILLE, July 1, 1886.

[blocks in formation]

60

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

66

1789 George Washington.

Elec. chosen by Legislature. Unan 1797 John Adams. Fed..

71 Thomas Jefferson. Dem.

69 1801 Thomas Jefferson.

Dem. . Election went to H. of R.. 73 Aaron Burr..

Dem. and Jefferson was elected 73 John Adams. Fed... on the 36th ballot.

65 1805 Thomas Jefferson

Dem. Elec. chosen by Legislature. 148 C.C. Pinckney. Fed.

28 1809 James Madison. Dem.

122 C.C. Pinckney. Fed.

47 1813 James Madison. Dem.

128 De Witt Clinton. Fed..

89 1817 James Monroe. Dem.

183 Rufus King. Fed..

34 1821 James Monroe.

Dem. But 1 electoral vote in op... 1825 J. Q. Adams.

Fed. 105,321. Elec. by H. of R. 84 Andrew Jackson. Dem. 155,872.

99 W. H. Crawford. Dem. 44,282.

41 Henry Clay. Whig 46,587.

37 1829 Andrew Jackson. Dem. 617.231.

178 J. Q. Adams Fed... 509,097.

83 1833 Andrew Jackson. Dem. 687,502.

219 Henry Clay.. Whig. 530,189.

49 John Floyd.. Whig. Not known.

11 William West. Whig .

7 1837 Martin Van Buren. Dem. 761,549,

170 William H. Harrison.. Whig . 736,656.

12 1841 William H. Harrison. Whig. 1,275,011.

234 Martin Van Buren. Dem. . 1,135,761.

60 1845 James K. Polk. Dem. . 1,337,243.

170 Henry Clay. Whig . 1,361,362.

105 1849 Zachary Taylor.. Whig . (1,360,099.

163 Lewis Cass. Dem. .1,220,544..

127 Martin Van Buren

Dem. 291,263. 1853 Franklin Pierce..

Dem. 1,601,474. Winfield Scott and others. Whig - 1,542,403.

42 1857|James Buchanan.. Dem, 1,838,169.

174 John C. Fremont and others.. Rep... 2,215,798. 1861 Abraham Lincoln Rep... 1,866,352.

180 J. C. Breckenridge and others. Dem. . 2,810,501.

123 1865 Abraham Lincoln.. Rep. 12,216,067.

213 Geo. B. McClellan. Dem. . 1,808,725.

21 1869 Ulysses S. Grant.. Rep... 3,015,071.

214 Horatio Seymour.. Dem. .2,709,613.

80 1873 Ulysses S. Grant... Rep. 3,597.070..

300 Horace Greeley.... L. & D.(2,834,079..

66

122

« AnteriorContinuar »