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Countess de Luftanou.". This lady was His Majesty's mistress, and no doubt knew the value of the secret too well not to sell it for a handsome bribe. She was banished from the capital after the King's death.Such are the effe&s of secret influence.

THE TURF,

[From the British Press.]
TO BE SOLD, AT THE HACKNEY REPOSITORY,

GRUB STREET,
COURIER, a dark brown horse, late the property of

-, Esq. a hot fiery animal, extremely vicious, apt to lash out behind, and a great biter. Courier was got by Jacobin, dam by Guillotine, grand-dam by Regicide, and great-grand dam by Robespierre, out of an old Cade mare.

In 1793, Courier proved himself a colt of great promise, having diltanced Telegraph, a capital horse of the day, for the sweepstakes over the Revolution course. After long performance, with various fuccefs, he broke down in a match againit Loyalty, Britannia, and John Bull. It is a curious circumstance in the history of the turf, that Courier, in his prime, was always rode by a French jockey, and was never once backed by a true Englishman. He is very awkward in his paces, steps badly, dishes, and throws up The dirt in every diredion. He is hard mouthed, and has more than once swallowed the bit in running. It is, therefore, very unfate to ride him, vpless with a curb. For some time he has been driven in a tandeni; took the whip kindly, and was found to go tolerably well in harness. Last season he was hunted with a pack of Fox hounds; but he wanted both speed and bottom; was dull and fluggish, and thrown out in the chase. In a recent plunge, Courier ran against a very strong Cabinet, by which he broke his chest, and is

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now considered by the knowing ones quite down before. Since that accident, he certainly stands very awkwardly, and appears also touched in the wind, or what the jockies call a roarer. His owners are anxious to have his ears foxed; but we think he is more in need of cropping and docking, and that these operations would greatly improve his appearance. Under thefe circumstances, it is evident that Courier is no longer fit for the road, the car, or the course; but as he is in good condition, and has a deal of hard food in his belly, he may be worthy the notice of some cat and dog's meat man. It is, besides, not impoffible, that with good keeping, a hackney coachman, who is a good whip, might be able to work a few jobs out of him ftill.

LOVE ABUSED.

BY COWPER.

(From his Pofthumous Works.]
WHAT is there, in the vale of life,

Half so delightful as a wife,
When friend ip, love, and peace combine,
To stamp the marriage bond divine?
The stream of pure and gennine love
Derives its current from above;
And earth a second Eden show's,
Where'er the healing water fows:
But, ah ! if from the dikes and drains
Of fenfual nature's fev'rith veins,
Junt like a lawiefs, headstrony flood,
Impregnated with ooze and mud,
Descending fast on ev'ry fide,
Once mingles with the sacred tide-
Farewell the foul-enliv'ring 1cene!
The hanns that wore a finuing green,
With rank défilement overspread,
Bewail their flow'ry beauties dead.

Th

The stream polluted, dark and dull,
Diffu'd into a Stygian pool,
Through life's last melancholy years
Is fed with ever-flowing tears :
Complaints supply the zephyr's part,
And sighs that heave a breaking heart.

1

THE BACCHANALIAN RIVALS. TWO Aétors who jovially bow to the shrine

Of the god who presides o'er the fruit of the vice, In order the bill most attractive to make, Disputed what plays they should mutually take; Till at length (surely tippling gives exquisite picasure) They fate down, and agreed to take " Meafure for Meafure." Garrick's Head.

Віво. .

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Now blooming youth around appear,
All envious of the blits I

prove,
And taunt me sore with jest and jeer,

Because I fiil presunie to love!
Insensible to ev'ry joke,

At length I strove a kiss to gain,
When, woe is me, a wretch! I woke

Oh ! how 1 longid 10 feep again!!!

1

THE SWALLOW.

FROM THE SAME.
Σιγα-ισως δε τις ήξει ονειρος
Os
με

Ροδανθειους πήχεσιν 2. up.C0201.-Anthol. B. 7. WHAT wouldft thou I thould do, I pray,

What wouldft thou, twitt'ring Swallow, fay!
Shall I seize thee, noisy bird,
And let thee ne’er again be heard ;
Cut, of thy faucy tongue, the strings *;
And clip, in spite, thy airy wings?
Why with thy matin notes-no!-hideous screams,
Why didst thou ravish Helen from my dreams?

THE ARGUMENT.

FROM THE GREEK OF ANACREON.

Mn

Me pinyns.

AH! Hy me not, thou lovely fair !

But let iny passion be return'd,
Though cruel Time my golden hair
Has all to filver ringlets turn'd t.

* According to the Greek, Cul off your tongue, as Tereus formerly did, -The fable is well known.

Ille- -comprensam forcipe linguam,

Abftulit ense ferox.-----Metam. l. 5. f. 9. + This idea is an improvement on A'nacreon, borrowed from Petrarch, who talking of his Laura's growing old, makes this pretty antithefis ; E i cape' d'oro fin farsi d'argento.--Son. xi.

In

In thee the flow'rs of beauty breathe,

Yet ne'er despise thefe locks of mine;
For think in chaplet or in wreath

How sweet the rose and lily twine !

WAR.
Μωσ' αρ' αοιδον ανηκεν, αειδεμεναι κλεα ανδρων. -Ηom. Οd. 8.
A PARODY ON ANACREON'S ODE ON HIS LYRE.

OF Bacchus fair I fain would sing,

And rapt'rous strike the founding ftring;
But ah! alas! I strike in vain !
War, blood-stain'd war, fills ev'ry strain.
Defeated, cross'd-my breast on fire,
Aude I Aing the golden lyre;
Another seize, and all along
Its chords I sweep, and raise the fong
To love! to love, my soul's delight!
But hark! what sounds the ear affright..
Still mingled with love's soft alarms,
The clang of war resounds to arms !
Farewell io love then, and to wine
My lyre alone, O Mars! is thine!

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IMPROMPTU

FROM A GENTLEMAN, IN REPLY TO THE REBUKE OP

A BEAUTIFUL WOMAN, TO WHOM HE HAPPENED TO
MAKE A VISIT IMMEDIATELY AFTER HAVING PAID
HIS DEVOTIONS 10 THE JOLLY GOD.

[From the Morning Chronicle.]

WHY

HY thus, lovely Ven;is, on Bacchus look cold?

This lovel est when young--that brightest-when old ::
But thy roses, lair Venus, wiil'fono ceálieto biow,
While thine wili, o Bacchus, eternally glów,

BATH

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