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THE FEAST OF KINGS.
[From the Morning Poft.]

Rex denique regum!
THIS
HIS whimsical wizard, this pigmy of France,

As he lately through Germany led such a dance,
To conjure his vanity something to eat,
1.0! monarchs like mushrooms spring under his feet ;
The dunghill ephemera sprouting the while,
Crouch to his mercy, and live hy his smile;
Till Kingfisher Bony may sportively want
To give higher zeft to his fauces piquantes,
Cries, “Champignons royalts are excellent things,"
And gulps at one mouthful these Lilliput Kings!

FUNGUS.

CAUSES OF THE ENMITY OF THE FRENCH AGAINST ENGLAND PLAINLY STATED).

[From the General Evening Poft ] MR. EDITOR, I

HAVE often read in the papers, letters signed

Cato, Brutus, or Socrates, which I suppose are the names of fine ge!tlemen at the West end of the town, which talk a great deal about British principles and French principles, and constitutions and balances of power, and such other high-flown maiters. Some of these things they always pitch upon to be the causes

of

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CAUSES OF FRENCH ENMITY, 147 of the wars between England and France. I like these gentlemen very well for the fine words they make use of, but the deal a Cato or Socrates of them all knows any thing about the matter. Now, if you 'll give me a little room, I'll let you into the secret.

You must know then, that all this fighting is not about principles, or any such thing, but about one soop selling more than another, and Mr. Bull's getting on in trade so giuch faster than Mr. Frog. I don't wish to say any harın af Mr. Bull, but certain it is he was not always such a great man as he is now. When first he beginn'd the world he was but a poor wool-stapler, and used to sell all his wools raw to one Mynheer Brabant, and other folks. After a little while, he got to be a clothier, and sold his wools made up ; would not sell none no other

ways.

This foon inakes him rich, and then he fets up cutler besides, with a great many work-shops at Sheffield first, and then at Wolverhampion and Birmingham. makes money, as the saying is ; and it was always Mr. Bull's way, whenever he got a pound, to lay it out in getting another. So now he buys a very large estate, called the Weft Indies. In course, you know, all his tenants there deal for every thing they want only at his shop, and he buys all they have to fell, such as cotton, indigo, qum, sugar, and so on.These here things he brings home to his own fhop, and a fine figure you may be sure they cut there. Indeed, ever after this time he has called it a warehouse, and is affronted if any body calls it any thing else. All sorts of people come from far and lear to deal there for every thing. The next thing he does he buys another great estate called the Eaft Indies, and serves his tenants there the same way, gets them to buy every thing of hin, and fell every thing to him. So now he gets tea and silk, and i wenty things more into his warehouse. Well, after this, he sets up his sister

Hibernia

Well -- money

H 2

Hibernia in another large shop, and teaches her to ' makc linens. Through these ways he came to be what he is; and now he is so rich, that, wherever he choofes' to employ bis capital, he beats alınost every other tradesinan out of the market.

All this wbile Mr. Frog, though he began the world much better than Mr. Bull, has hardly been able to get into any other trade than the wine and brandy line, which he began with. Being moreover a devilith flaly, extravagant chap, whenever he gets any thing he spends it right out either in junketting, or swaggering about and quarrelling, which makes bad worfe; lo he feldom can make both ends meet, and he's been a bankrapt time after time. Having got no credit, he's obliged to pay money down for every thing he buys. Here again Mr. Bull beats him ; for as his notes are as goud as cash, he can buy every thing wholesale, all the world over, and make Mr. Frog himself come to his warehouse. Thus altogether, what with poverty and what with envy, Mr. Frag, you may be sure, cannot be quiet; and, as Mr. Bull will not give up business, they two can never agree. Mr. Frog wants some of Mri Bull's eftates in the East and Weft, but Mr. Bull says he'll be d-d if he shall have a bit.

Then there is another thing; Mr. Bull has got the best set of servants in all the world, called Jack Tars. O my

heart! it is a leafure to see these: such jolly, Strong, brave, clever fellows, does their work in such a style, and all in good humour too, it's a treat even to hear of them. Now Mr. Frag he wants to have ! fome fars too. So he puts jackets and trousers on people, and bids them go and swagger about, and quarrel with the Jacks. O! if you was bun to see how Mr. Bull's people serves them! Such upsetting, smashing, and lathering! Away rụn Mr. Frog's people back again, and then Mr. Frog spits at Mr. Bull, and calls him Tyrant! So you see, as I said be

fore,

his

fore, these two can never agree; and, if this is not a truer account of the inatter than ever Cato or Socrates lent you, say I 'm a fool, and not a deep dog of

A GROCER. Houndsditch, March 23.

STANZAS TO SPRING: A BURLESQUE..

[From the European Magızine.]
THE
HE feather'd file have fought the grove,

To warble forth their love-fraught lay ;
While laughing lcirbs, their bliss to prove,

Frisk arm in arm on ev'ry spray.
The woolly tribes that skim the stream,

Now seize the unsuspicious fly;
While foaring owls forget to dream,

And face the sun's superbest eye.
Each quadrupeilal bird is seen

Cropping the tender thistle's stem;
Whilst all the blue-bells look quite greeo,

And role-buds look as blue as them.
Each bellowing mephyr softly howls,

And light-wing'd tempefts deck the sky;
The voice of joy, in gentle growls,

Through ev'ry glade is heard to die.
Blue-ey'd funs now softly mine,

And mellow moons their tribute bring,
With ev'ry studded ftar divine,

To bail the fad approach of spring.
June 4th, 1806.

J.M.L.

IMPROMPTU ON THE DEATH OF MR. PITT.

BY MR. JERNINGHAM.

O MATCHLESS eloquence to wisdom join'd!

O splendid honour of the human mind!
O fun-like orb, that cheer'd the public eye,
At thy extinction Nature heav'd a ligh!

H 3

She

She met thy birth with gifts unknown before,
And o'er thy fvui diffnis'ci a lavish nore ;
V'et the!), 'tbole gitis from ouliers to withhold,
With jealous hanc llie crus’d the heav'nly mould.

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ADDRESSED TO THE COMMITTEE WHO HOLD THE SUB

SCXIPTION FOR THE ERECTION OF THE STATUE OF THE KI. HÚN, WM. Piir.

[Fiom the Morning Port.]
WH
THILE Paris fills the world with plaster kings,
And Rome, for saints, fome njould'ring carcasc

brings,
Let Britain fnew the sculptor's art divine,
And draw her glory with a marble line.
Un Dover's rocks let Virtue's statue stand,
In form of Pitt, to awe the Gallic land!-
There, white bold honour from each eye.ball glows,
And threat'ning juftice frowns upon his brows,
The breathing lips “ My Country !" Itill exclaim;
My Country echoes loud the voice of Fame !-
The found is lieard—the watch-word spreads afar,
And calls all England to the front of war :
While moveless on the shore the patriot stands,
A beacon of the brave from diftant lands;
Like Troy's bless'd ftatue, that Olympius gave,
Its men to rally-cünd the realm to save!

BRITANNICUS.

LXTEMPORE ON THE DEATH OF MR. PITT.

[From the General Evening Purt.]
TO
O heav'n he wings his glorious figlit,

In death immortal, as in living bright ;
He finks to riseliis earthly courte now run,
Clasp'd in his father's arms lives Chatham's son!

Almighty

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