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Almighty Lord, attend to England's pray'r,
Thy wonted goodness to our ille declare :
Grant her the aid the most requires,
When Nelson falls, and Pitt expires!

.T. E. Hook,

ELIJAH'S MANTLE.

VIDE 2D CHAP. 2D BOOK OF KINGS.

(Original.] [We have not permission to name ihe writer of this elegant tribute to

Mr. Pitt's memory; but most readers of taste will, wc think, make a shrewd gaels at the poet.] WHEN, by th’ Almighty's dread command,

Elijah, call'd from Israel's land,

'Rose in the sacred flaine ;
The mantle good Elisha caught,
And, with the prophet's spirit fraught,

Her sacred hope became.
In Pitt * our Israel faw combin'd
The patriot's heart, the prophet's mind;

Elijah's spirit here.
Now, fad reverse that spirit's reft,
No confidence, no hope is left,

For no Elijah's near.
Grenville ! to aid the Treasury fame,
A portion of his mantle claim,

Pitt's gen'rous ardour feel;
'Bove fordid iels resolve to soar,
Amidst Exchequer gold be poor;

Thy wealth a nation's wcal.
Fox! if on thee some remnant fall,
The shred may to thy mind recali

Those hours of loud debate,
When thy unhallow'd lips oft praised
The “ glorious fabric” traitors rais'd

On Bourbon's fallen state.

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Thy foul let Pitt's example fire,
With patriot zeal thy tongue inspire,

Spite of thy Gallic leaven;
And teach thee in thy latest day
His form of pray'r, (if thou canl pray,)

“Oh! fave iny country, Heaven."
Windham, if e'er thy forrows flow
At private loss or public woe,

Thy rigid brow unbend :
Tears over Cæsar, Brutus fhed,
His hatred warr'd not with the dead,

And Pirt was once i hly friend.
Does envy bid thee not to mourn?
Hold then his mantle up to scorn;

His well-earn'd fanie affail;
Of funeral honours rob his corse,
And at his virtues, till thou 'rt hoarse,

Like the Greek cynic * rail.
Illuftrious Roscius of the state,
New-breech'd and harness'd for debate;

Thou wonder of thy age !
Petty or Betty art thou hight ,
By Granta I sent to strut thy might

On Stephen's hustling stage
Pitt's chequer'd robe 't is thine to wear,
Take, of his mantle too, a share:
'T will aid thy ways

and means i And should fat Jack and his cabal g Cry, " Rob us the Exchequer, Hal,"

'T will charm away the fiends. Sage Palinurus of the realm, By Vincent call’d to take the helm,

And play his proxy's part, Dost thou ur star or compass know? Canft reef aloft, or steer below ?

Hast conn'd the seaman's chart?

* Thersites. Cambridge.

† An old word for called.

Shakspeare's Henry IV.

No!

No! from Pitt's mantle tear a rag,
Enough to serve thee for a flag,

And hoist it on thy mast:
Beneath that fign, (our prosp'rous ftar,)
Shall future Nelsons rush to war,

And rival victories past.
Sidmouth! though low that head is laid,
Which call'd thee from thy native fade,

And gave thee second birth;
Gave thee the sweets of pow'r and place,
The tufted robe and gilded mace,

And rear'd thy puny worth;
Think how his mantle wrapt thee round;
Is one of equal virtue found

Among thy new compeers ?
Or can thy cloak of Amiens stuff,
Once laugh'd to fcorn by blue and buff,

Hide thee from Windbam's jeers ?
When faction threaten'd Britain's land,
Thy new-made friends, a desp'r te band,

Like Ahab stood reprov'd;
Pitt's pow'rful tongue

their
rage

could check;
His.counsel fav'd from general wreck

The Israel that he lov'd.
Yes, hunour'd flade! while near thy grave-
The letter'd sage and chieftain brave

The votive marble claim,
O’er thy cold corse the public tear,
Congeald, a crystal fhrine shall rear,

Unsullied as thy fame.

THE SIMILE OF ISAAC HAWKINS BROWNE,

ESQ, M.P.-AN EPIGRAM

[From the Morning Chronicle.).
OF Auguftus and Rome the poets ftill warble,

That he found it of brick, and he left it of marble;
So of Pitt and of England, they say, without vapour,
That he found it of gold, and he left it of paper.

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V PO

LINES BY A YOUNG LADY OF SEVENTEEN, BEING PRESENTED BY HER FATHER WITH A

BUST OF THE HON. C. J. FOX.

[From the Morning Chronicle.)
IN
N this cold bust a faint atlempi we see,

A vain attempt, great Fox! to picture thee;
For say, can bronze, or marble, e'er impart
That magic charm, warın-breathing from the heart,
That fire, which, darting from th' expreflive eye,
Points, with redoubled force, the keen reply?
Or when thy eloquence, with milder flow,
In freedoin's caufe bids wond'ring senates glow?
Or when, obeying facred friend thip's call,
Thou monrn’st illustrious Russel's early fall ?
In those blest moments, when bright Genius pours,,
At Feeling's shrine, his tributary stors,
Vainly the imitative arts aspire
To give thy varying features all their fire;
Yet, though in vain the scuiptor seeks to trace,
With vent'rous harid, thy soul-illumin'd face,
Thy fame a nobler monument shall prove,
Fix'd on the firmelt base-a nation's love.
To distant ages thall thy name descend,
And gratefui Britons hail Britanvia's friend.

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THE COALITION PURVEYORS:--A FABLE.

[From the Public Ledger.]

Carpe diem.
WHEN tivo men ride upon a horse,

One of them must, by choice or force,
Submit

upon

the

rump to straddle,
While t'other occupies the saddle :-
So it is when in the cabinet
Two adverse parties chance to get :
Their only union of wish is
To gobble up the !oaves and times
The one must rule, the one submit,
Or nothing can be done that's fit,

The

The Lion's chosen Jackal dead,
The royal table who shall spread ?-
The Fox and Wolf, both beasts of parts,
This fam'd for strength, and that for arts,
Proffer'd their labours to unite,
To set aside prefcriptive right,
And ouf all Jackals, who, they swore,
Had brought their master to death's door.-
But long-indulg’d antipathies,
The task was, how to neutralize!
The Fox stood up for Geese and Chickens,
For these were his own favourite pickings;
The Wolf, for a more generous food,
That might invigorate the blood !
Thus more like quacks than cooks contending,
Each his own system while defending,
The waste of Nature unsupplied,
'T were odds, in time, their patient-died !

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IMPROMPTU, ON MR. FOX DECLARING IN THE HOUSE OF COMMONS,

THAT THE COUNTRY WOULD PREFER A LARGE IN. CREASE OF THE PROPERTY TAX PER,SALTUM," TO A GRADUAL INCREASE OF IT.

[From the Morning Poft.)
Foxus'd to think our taxes high,

and often strøve to halt 'em;
But now he's jump'd fo high himself,

He likes to tax per faltum.

IMPROMPTU ON THE PROPOSED TAXES.

AS

S streamlets to wide rivers grow,

And richest meadows overflow;
So taxes from a Petty source
May yet o'erwhelm us in their course.

RUFUS.

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