The national religion the foundation of national education: a sermon preached ... June 13, 1811, the time of the yearly meeting of the children educated in the charity schools in London and Westminster. To which is annexed, An account of the Society for promoting Christian knowledge

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Página 4 - YE are to take care that this Child be brought to the Bishop to be confirmed by him, so soon as he can say the Creed, the Lord's Prayer, and the Ten Commandments, and is sufficiently instructed in the other parts of the Church Catechism, set forth for that purpose.
Página 4 - And all Fathers, Mothers, Masters, and Dames, shall cause their Children, Servants, and Apprentices, ((which have not learned their Catechism}) to come to the Church at the time appointed, and obediently to hear, and be ordered by the Curate, until such time as they have learned all that is here appointed for them to learn.
Página 5 - Berwick-upon-Tweed, or of officiating in any church or chapel within the same, where the Liturgy of the Church of England as now by law established...
Página 4 - YE are to take care that this child be brought to the bishop, to be confirmed by him, so soon as he can say the Creed, the Lord's Prayer, and the Ten Commandments, in the vulgar tongue, and be further instructed in the Church Catechism set forth for that purpose.
Página 4 - ... the Creed, the Lord's Prayer, and the Ten Commandments, in the vulgar tongue, and all other things which a Christian ought to know and believe to his soul's health...
Página 8 - Church-of-England education ? Can they do it without betraying the cause, which they are pledged to defend? ' It may indeed be asked, whether every man from the lowest to the highest, who holds an office of trust or power, whether religious or civil, which he could not have obtained but by professing himself a member of the National C/iurch, is not bound by such profession, if not only openly to discountenance, at least not openly to promote, a system of education, from which the National Religion...
Página 30 - It is an union of Churchmen with Churchmen, which must promote the welfare of the Establishment. We cannot indeed expect, that Dissenters should be willing to co-operate with Churchmen, when the object in contemplation was the interest of the Church. ' For this purpose, we must associate among ourselves: we must retain the strength of the Establishment in its own channel...
Página 9 - If this philanthropy be applied to religion, it is equally capable of abuse. Hard, indeed, must be the heart of that man, and poor indeed his understanding, who can see a fellow-creature in distress, and coldly ask, before he relieves him, to what religion he belongs ? Whether a Jew...
Página 28 - State implies utility to the State. Without a prospect of some advantage to be derived from the Church, the State would have neither sought its alliance, nor granted it protection. Whether our ancestors judged rightly in this respect, or whether civil society (as some modern theorists imagine) can be as "well conducted, without the aid of an established religion, yet as long as the present Constitution remains, it is both the duty and the interest of all, who are members of it, to adhere to the principles,...
Página 10 - These are Mr. Lancaster's own words in the Introduction, (p. viii.) to his work, entitled ' Improvements in Education.' It is obvious from the general tenor of this Introduction, that the word " sect " is there applied, as well to the established, as to the tolerated religions in this country. NB The edition from which I now quote, is the sixth. * Mr. Lancaster, speaking of his school at p.

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