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348. Robert Heath and Robert Shute to the Marquis of Buckingham. Certain attorneys have been trying to withdraw cases from the Court of Sling's Bench.

349. List of the household of the King of France.

350. The Marquis of Buckingham to Christian IV., King of Denmark. Recommends Sir Robert Anstruther to him.

351. Sir Isaac Wake to the Marquis of Buckingham. Congratulates him on the new year. Asks for payment of his salary.

352. The Marquis of Buckingham to the Lord Chancellor Verulam. Explains that the King cannot give him the making of a Baron.

353. Sir George Calvert to the Marquis of Buckingham. The bearer has a message from Turin. The Duke of Savoy offers many baits to His Majesty. Sends a letter for signature. Parliament is still busy with the elections. Returns questioned.

354. Sir George Murray to the Marquis of Buckingham. The Council have examined the case of Scott of Bonington, the murderer of Walter Scott. No impartial witnesses were present. But all presumptions go to show that it was a deliberate murder. (See No. 231.)

355. Sir George Calvert to the Marquis of Buckingham. Sends for signature a letter drawn up according to His Majesty's directions, for the stay of his daughter's visit to England.

356. Sir Edward Herbert to the Marquis of Buckingham. Sends a copy of a declaration said to have been made by Buckingham to Gondomar.

357. Sir Isaac Wake to the Marquis of Buckingham. His arrears of salary are so great that he flies to him for help. All the overtures sent from the Duke of Savoy were made upon the supposition that His Majesty intended to take arms.

358. Sir John Eyre to the Marquis of Buckingham. The Sultan has set out to attack the Poles. He will help the Bohemians and Hungarians, if he finds them able to resist.

359. Sir John Eyre to the Marquis of Buckingham. The Sultan has sent to the Ambassadors of the Emperor, the King of Bohemia and Bethlen Gabor to follow him to Adrianople. The Bohemian Ambassadors went off very poor, receiving no help from the Dutch Ambassador. The Emperor's Ambassador, Cesare Gallo, did not take leave of the Dutch Ambassadors or of myself.

360. Sir Walter Aston to the Marquis of Buckingham. Sends Ciriza's letter, complaining of Sir R. Mansell. Hears that the fleet was at Majorca on the last of May. Notice shall be given of this complaint to Mansell. Requests that his own allowances may be duly paid.

361. Sir Robert Naunton to the Marquis of Buckingham. Begs for an answer to his late letter.

362. The Bishop of Coventry and Lichfield to the Marquis of Buckingham. Excuses himself for having attempted to reconcile Spenser and Arundel.

363. Sir George Calvert to the Marquis of Buckingham. Sends news of the death of the Archduke Albert. It is thought at Brussels that the Infanta will retire, and the government be given to Spinola.

July 10. 364. Lord Clifford to the Marquis of Londes- Buckingham. Has heard a report that borough. the reversion of the cloth export has been

promised to another. Wishes to know in

what he has offended.

July 19. 365. Viscount Doncaster to the MarEssex House, quis of Buckingham. Wishes to send letters lately received by the Deputies of La Rochelle, which will show how heavy his burden has been.

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366. Sir George Calvert to the Marquis of Buckingham. By Trumbull's letters it appears there is a change in the Emperor s affairs. Oxford is ordered to attend His Majesty. It were well that he were charged not to accuse any one out of jealousy.

367. Sir Thomas Coventry to the Marquis of Buckingham. Gondomar has complained to me of the vexation of certain recusants. It appears that there are cases of ordinary indictment, and not of vexation; he wishes to know what he is to do.

368. Lord Brooke to the Marquis of Buckingham. Recommends a nominee of Sir F. Gofton for a place in the Exchequer.

369. Petition for relief to Sir T. Gerrard, who has lost by the suppression of the monopoly of making tobacco pipes.

370. Dr. John Donne to the Marquis of Buckingham. Had counted himself sure of tho Deanery of Salisbury. Hears that the Lord Keeper will keep the deanery of Westminster. Is a clod of clay in his Lordship's hands.

371. Lord Keeper Williams to Mr. John Packer. Hears that the Dean of Salisbury willingly consents to his remaining in the Deanery of Westminster, which he desires only to enable him to support his great place. The Bishopric of Lincoln is lamentably poor.

372. The Earl of Melros to the Mar

?uis of Buckingham. Thanks him for avour shown to his son.

Sept. 1. 373. Lord Dumfermline to the Marquis Dumfermline. of Buckingham. Begs him not to listen to evil reports against him till he has heard his defence.

Sept. 1. Westminster College.

Sept. 3. London.

Sept.

Oct. 17. Westminster College.

374. Lord Keeper Williams to Mr. John Packer. Dr. Sharp asks me to recommend him to the Bishopric of Exeter. Wishes it may fall upon Dr. Carey or Dr. Richardson.

375. John Shotbolt to James I. His plan for inclosing King's Sedgmoor having been placed in the hands of others to execute, has come to nothing. He begs that it may be taken up again.

376. The Marquis of Buckingham to Sir George Calvert. His Majesty wishes him to write to Spinola to thank him for his information, and to assure him that His Majesty is persuaded that his son-inlaw has had nothing to do with Mansfeld's courses. The certainty of Mansfeld's actions will soon be known from Digby. His Majesty also wishes a letter to be written to the Infanta. Alteration to be made in the instructions to Sir Thomas Roe.

377. Lord Keeper Williams to Mr. John Packer. Recommends an alteration in the proclamation against the scriveners. Hopes the King will confirm an arrangement with the Bishop of Exeter. Recommends Mr. Clarke.

Oct. 18. 378. Viscount St. Alban to the Marquis of Buckingham. Holograph. Printed in Stephens' collection, 154.

Oct. 22. 379. Lord Keeper Williams to Mr. John Westminster Packer. Thanks him for his treatment College. of Mr. Clarke. Has not heard whether the proclamation is to be altered.

Oct. 31. 380. The Earl of Southampton to Lord Tichfield. Keeper Williams. Having heard nothing about his pension, he knows not what to do.

Nov. 7. 38]. Count Leveneur de Tillieres to the 17, Marquis of Buckingham. Asks to have an audience of the King.

Nov. 8. 382. The Earl of Northampton to the Ludlow. Marquis of Buckinghem. Begs him to procure him leave to be absent from Parliament.

Nov. 13. 383. The Archbishop of Canterbury to Lambeth. James I. Explains his reasons for delaying the consecration of the Bishops.

Nov. 13. 384. Lord Keeper the Bishop of Lincoln Westminster to the Marquis of Buckingham. The College. Earl of Southampton is ready to follow His Majesty's directions, but wishes a dispensation from his attendance in Parliament. Is sorry that a person recommended by him has been refused a reversion of a poor place. He was consecrated last Sunday.

Nov. 13. 385. Lord Keeper the Bishop of LinWestminster coin to Mr. John Packer. Informs him College. of certain church promotions.

Nov. 16. 386. Lord Keeper the Bishop of LinWestminster coin to Mr. Packer. Thanks for keepCollege, ing him in the Parsonage of Walgrave. The Judges inform him that he may be restored to his temporalities with a respite of homage. Many reversions have been granted in his Court, and only his recommendation refused.

Nov. 387. Warrant, with the Attorney-Gene

ral's opinion attached to it, granting respite of homage to the Bishop of Lincoln.

Nov. 22. 388. Lord Keeper the Bishop of LinWestminster coin to Mr. John Packer. Thanks him College. for obtaining the restitution of his temporalities; and begs him to get the Archdeaconry of Huntington for Dr. Gwyn.

Nov. 27, 389. The Marquis of Buckingham to

Lord . Asks him to abate a fine

demanded from Sir G. Paul upon the renewal of a lease.

Dec. 3. 320. Sir Robert Heath to the Marquis of Buckingham. Sir Thomas Watson, for whom he had become security, has died in debt to the King. He begs his case may be referred to the Lord Treasurer and the Attorney-General, and that he may have only such favour as they think is just.

Dec. 391. The Marquis of Buckingham to

Sir George Calvert. Not to allow the House to proceed too far in Coke's case, and to inquire whether actions intended are included in the general pardon. If not, you are to get a bill put into the Star Chamber against Coke.

Dec. 15. 392. Lady Mary Wroth to the Marquis of Buckingham. She never meant her book to offend, and has now stopped the sale of it.

Und, 393. Sir Horace Vere to the Marquis of

Buckingham. The bearer will inform him of the wretched state of the army.

Uad. 394. Sir John Vaughan to Buckingham.

Offers his son's services, and desires leave for him to travel.

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395. The Marquis of Buckingham to Sir Henry Wotton. There has been a treaty between the Lord Treasurer [as Master of the Wards], and the Master of the Rolls, for an exchange of their places. "If this had taken effect, I should have "asked you whether you wished to sue"ceed. This is broken off, and you had "better keep to His Majesty's gracious "promise for the Rolls."

396. Sir Dudley Carlcton to the Marquis of Buckingham. Sir Henry Rich, who is returning to England, has done himself great credit in Court and camp. Sends a letter from Italy.

397. Lord Keeper the Bishop of Lincoln to the Marquis of Buckingham. Wishes to know if the Star Chamber suit against Lord Houghton is to be put an end to.

398. Sir George Calvert to the Marquis of Buckingham. Recommends Dr. Wright for the Archbishopric of York.

399. The Bishop of London to the Marquis of Buckingham. Has stayed his officers from finding any verdict on the Earl of Berkshire, till he hears from him.

400. Chief Justice Ley to the Marquis of Buckingham. Will pay the benevolence. Wishes leave to go on the Western Circuit, his health not being good.

401. Mr. William Trumbull to the Marquis of Buckingham. Has written by the Count of Horn an account of a scheme which purports to benefit trade in His Majesty's realms.

402. Lord Falkland to the Marquis of Buckingham. Lady Wallingford begs that the Earl and Countess of Somerset may be allowed to go to New Elm.

403. Sir John Suckling to the Marquis of Buckingham. Begs that the Lord Keeper may be directed to pass Dr. Flnud's Patent for the business of steel, which is not a monopoly.

404. The Bishop of Salisbury to the Marquis of Buckingham. If it appears that the petition of the fellows is falsely coloured, he hopes that he will not have to leave his Mastership so soon as in March.

405. Mr. John Packer to Lord Keeper the Bishop of Lincoln. The Deanery has been already bestowed on Dr. Beaumont.

406. Lord Keeper the Bishop of Lincoln to Mr. John Packer. Sends a letter on Mr. Murray's proceedings. Will answer Sir S. Montague soon. Begs him to put Buckingham in mind of Dr. Piers.

407. Lord Keeper the Bishop of Lincoln to Mr. John Packer. Dr. Piers will be glad of the Deanery of Peterborough, and will say nothing against Dr. Beaumont.

408. The Earl of Nottingham to the Marquis of Buckingham. Asks that His Majesty will give him sixteen or twenty stags for his park at lieigatc, that he may be able to hunt them in his old age.

409. Sir George Calvert to the Marquis of Buckingham. The Emperor's Ambassador [Schwarzenberg] landed last night at Gravesend.

410. Sir Edward Herbert to the Marquis of Buckingham. The settlement of the troubles in France has been referred to Marshal Lesdiguieres.

411. The Earl of Suffolk to the Marquis of Buckingham. Thanks him for procuring from His Majesty a letter for the Lord Keeper.

July 31. WiganHall.

Aug. 20. Eccleshall.

Sept. 20. Dublin.

Oct. 10.

Oct. 16.

Oct. 17.

Oct. 21.

Oct. 28. Westminster College.

Oct. 31. The Ilague.

Nov.

Nov. 19.

Nov. 26.

Dec. 20. Turin.

Und.

1623. Feb. 13.

412. The Bishop of Chester to Mr. John Packer. Thanks God for the blessings afforded to the Church by Mr. Packer. Mr. Hyat preached at Goosnargh. As he is paid by Mr. Packer, ho wishes to consult him as to the place where he is to remain. All the country blesses God for his preaching.

412. Mr. William Fenncr to Mr. John Packer. Has received favour from the Bishop of Lichfield and Coventry. Has preached were he thought there was need, but now has a fixed abode.

413. Sir Francis Anneslcy to the Marquis of Buckingham. Hears he is offended with him for signing a letter in which there was impcrtiment mention of Mr. Wray's grant of natives' fines, which belonged to his Lordship. He, however, protested against it, though he signed it, being overruled.

414. Sir Robert Heath to the Marquis of Buckingham. Gives an opinion in favour of Sir Henry Fyues in a case before the Court of Wards.

415. The Earl of Kelly to the Marquis of Buckingham. Gives an account of his negotiation about Lady Purbeck's alimony.

416. Mr. John Kcymer to the Marquis of Buckingham. Has presented to His Majesty a proposal which will benefit trade and increase his revenue. Hopes the inclosed warrant will be signed.

417. Sir Georgo Calvert to the Marquis of Buckingham. Begs an order for a Privy Seal for 2.000J.

418. Lord Keeper the Bishop of Lincoln to Mr. John Packer. Has not yet received the King's reference of the dispute between the Earls of Ormond and Desmond. Thinks it is suppressed by one of them. Recommends one of three persons for the Bishopric of Bristol.

419. Mr. Edward Conway to the Marquis of Buckingham. Sends him a plan of the siege of Bergen-op-Zoom.

420. James I. to Sir George Calvert. [Fragment of draft.] Wonders that the Commissioners for the India business have neglected to meet those of the States. They are to do so no longer.

421. The English Commissioners for the East India business to James I. Detail their negotiation with the States' Commissioners.

422. The Earl of Ormond to the Marquis of Buckingham. To know whether His Majesty had not determined that there should bo an inquiry into the failure of paying the money allotted Jo him.

423. Sir Isaac Wake to the Marquis of Buckingham. Asks leave to coine home to be married, and to be paid his allowances.

424. M. de Bassompierre to the Marquis of Buckingham. Letter of compliment.

Oct. 12. 429. Viscount St. Alban to the Duke of Buckingham. Holograph. Printed in Stephens' second collection, 177.

Oct. 12. 430. Sir Thomas Roe to the Duke of Constanti- Buckingham. Recommends to him a nople. jeweller who has a magnificent diamond for sale.

Oct. 22, Gray's Iun.

Nov. 26.
Dec. 19.

1624. Jan. 9.

Jan. 14.

Jan. 15.

Jan. 17. Tawstock.

Jan. 22.

Jan. 24.

March 19.

April 3. Constantinople.

Feb. 13.

March 27. Royston.

Oct. 6. Charing Cross,

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431. Viscount St. Alban to the Duke of Buckingham. Holograph. Printed in Stophens' second collection, 179.

432. Viscount St. Alban to the Duko of Buckingham. Holograph. Printed in Stephens' second collection, 181.

433. M. do Bellegarde to the Duke of Buckingham. Congratulates him on his return from Spain.

434. M. do Bellegarde to the Duke of Buckingham. Congratulates him on the breach of the Spanish marriage. Hopes that the French marriage treaty will be set on foot again.

435. Lord Keeper the Bishop of Lincoln to Mr. John Packer. Sends Lord Say's submission. If the Bishop of Winchester cannot preach at the opening of Parliament the Bishops of Lichfield and Exeter would bo suitable.

436. Lord Keeper the Bishop of Lincoln to James I. Sends Lord Say's submission.

437. The Earl of Bath to the Duke of Buckingham. Asks leave of absence from Parliament, and offers his proxy.

438. Lord Kensington to the Duke of Buckingham. Is now ready to start.

439. Lord Clifford to the Duke of Buckingham. Begs to be excused from Parliament.

440. Archbishop Spottiswoode to tho Duke of Buckingham. Is glad to hear of the proceedings in Parliament.

441. Sir Thomas Roe to the Duke of Buckingham. Sends a copy of a relation of the state of the Turkish Empire. Bethlen Gabor would be ready to make war out of spite.

442. M. do Martinengo to the Duke of Buckingham. Congratulates him on the King's generous resolution. The Queen Mother and the French King are well disposed towards Buckingham.

443. Mr. Richard Knightley to the Duko of Buckingham. Explains tho causes of the delay of the Subsidy Bill.

441. M. de Martinengo to tho Duke of Buckingham. Thanks him for his letters.

445. Elizabeth ex-Queen of Bohemia to the Duke of Buckingham. Her brother has sent her some horses. So glad to hear of his recovery.

410. Christian Duke of Brunswick to the Duke of Buckingham. Congratulates him on his recovery.

447. Sir Dudley Carleton to the Duke of Buckingham. Begs for a month's leave of absence.

448. Sir Francis Nethersolc to Mr. John Packer. The illness of his mother, who is dying, has caused his stay away from Court.

449. The Duke of Buckingham to Lewis XIII. He cannot express the honour done to him by His Majesty's letter. His master wishes the marriage above all things, and will do all he can to favour it, though he cannot be expected to go beyond certain limits.

Aug. 20. 450. Sir Edward Barrett to the Duke London. of Buckingham. Auditor Sariey having died without will or heirs, his lands escheat to the Crown. He is not worthy of such a gift, but would deserve anything given to him.

Sept. 7. 451. M. do Ville-aux-Clercs to the yfl Duke of Buckingham. Letter of comSt. Germains- pliment. en-Laye.

Sept. 7. 452. Marshal Schomberg to the Duke 17". of Buckingham. Letter of compliment.

Sept. 10. 453. A. Valaresso to the Duke of 20T Buckingham. Begs him to listen to the bearer.

Sept. 26. 454. M. de Beaulieu to the Duke of Oct. 6. Buckingham. Letter of compliment.

Oct. 13. 455. Captain John Chudleigh to the Flushing. Duke of Buckingham. Has landed Mansfield at Flushing to-day.

Oct. 17. 456. Sir Thomas Chamberlain to the London. Duke of Buckingham. Wishes, although he is made Justice of Chester, to keep his Justiceship of the Courts at Westminster.

Oct, 18. 457. The Earl of Oxford to the Duke Walwyk. of Buckingham. Reminds him of his request that if any one were to be Colonel General under Mansfeld over the English troops, he might be chosen. The entrenchment at Walwyk finished.

Oct. 19. 458. Lord Keeper the Bishop of LinWestminster coin to Mr. John Packer. Sends Sir College. Thomas Chamberlain's request to be a supernumerary Judge of the Common Pleas.

Nov. 8. 459. Sir Isaac Wake to the Duke of Turin. Buckingham. The bearer, M. Valois,

will give all information about these

parts.

Nov. 16. 460. The Marquis of Effiat to the 26. Duke of Buckingham. Couriers from London. Paris testify to the general joy.

Nov. 17. 461. Viscount St. Alban to the Duke Gray's Inn. of Buckingham. Autograph signature only. Printed in Stephens second collection, 185.

Feb. YL_
27.
London.

Feb. 20.
March 2.
London.

Feb.

Nov. 26. Westminster College.

Dec. 9. 19. Constantinople.

1624 f Und.

Und.

Und.

1625. Jan. 27.

Feb. 6. Paris.

Jan. 27. Feb. 6.

Jan. 28. Feb. 8.

Feb. 16.

26. London.

462. Lord Keeper the Bishop of Lincoln, to Mr. Packer. Begs him to get Dr. Williams made Dean of Ripon.

463. Sir Thomas Roe to the Duke of Buckingham. Begs him to recommend to the company a fit man to succeed him in the embassy.

464. Charles Emanuel, Duke of Savoy, to the Duke of Buckingham. Letter of compliment.

465. Victor Amadeus, Prince of Piedmont, to the Duke of Buckingham. Letter of compliment.

466. M. de Cortenuo to the Duke of Buckingham. Letter of compliment.

467. M. do Villc-aux-Clercs to the Duke of Buckingham. Father Berulle will soon be here. Admires Buckingham's prudence and generosity in confirming his words about Mansfeld's passage.

468. The Count of Verrue to the Duke of Buckingham. Incloses letters from his master [the Duke of Savoy] and the Prince.

469. Madame de la Tremouille to the Duke of Buckingham. The storm has not only stopped the passage of the French cavalry, but has injured the vessels of war which were to have escorted it.

470. Christian, Duke of Brunswick, to the Duke of Buckingham. Begs for ships to take over the French cavalry.

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471. The Marquis of Effiat to the Duke of Buckingham. Our ships having been wrecked, it is hoped that the English will send ships to take over the cavalry.

472. The Marquis of Effiat to the Duke of Buckingham. Asks for an audience to announce the arrival of the dispensation. The persecution of the Catholics continues.

473. Lord Keeper the Bishop of Lincoln to Mr. John Packer. There is general satisfaction at Sir G. Coke's appointment to a Justiceship of the Common Pleas. Sends warrants for the new King's Serjeants. Thanks for his pension.

474. The Marquis of Effiat to the Duke of Buckingham. Has always expressed his contentment with the letter of the Archbishop of York, or such a one as the Lord Keeper promised him. Begs for a permission to take the ships of which his secretary has given a list.

475. The Marquis of Effiat to the Duke of Buckingham. Asks what news has been brought by Walter Montague.

476. James I. to the Prince of Orange in favour of Nicholas Rabbe.

477. Sir Thomas Dutton to the Duke of Buckingham. The army is in a miserable plight.

478. The Earl of Exeter to the Duke of Buckingham. Expresses his readiness to devote himself to his Lordship in the new reign.

479. The Earl of Melros to the Duke of Buckingham. He never wished to outlive his master, but is comforted by knowing who is his successor.

480. The Earl of Carlisle to the Duke of Buckingham. Wishes he were here but can conceive that he is more wanted at home.

481. Elizabeth, ex-Queen of Bohemia, to the Duke of Buckingham. Has sent Nethersole to condole with her brother.

482. Wolfgang William, Count Palatine of Neuburg, to the Duke of Buckingham. Is sorry to have missed him at Paris.

483. The Prisoners at the Conciergerie to the Duke of Buckingham. They have not yet been set at liberty.

484. Count Mansfeld to the Duke of Buckingham. Explains the reasons which make it impossible for him not to dismiss some of the officers of the Earl of Lincoln's regiment.

485. Elizabeth, ex-Queen of Bohemia, to the Duke of Buckingham. Expresses her satisfaction with her brother s messages. Has asked Sir Henry Vane to speak to him. Commends to him "her "servant Ashburnham."

486. Frederick, ex-King of Bohemia, to the Duke of Bohemia. Has no other consolation for the late King's death than the good will of the present one.

487. Mary, Queen Dowager of France, to the Duke of Buckingham. Having informed the King's son of the proposals of the King of Great Britain, has sent his answer. Hears that her daughter has been hindered by a storm from crossing.

488. M. de Bonceuil to the Duke of Buckingham. Recommends M. de Blainville to him.

489. Lady Howard de Walden to the Duke of Buckingham. Thanks him for procuring the grant of her " first request "to the King.8

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490. M. de Barodat [?] to the Duke of Buckingham. Regrets not having been visited by him at Compi&gne.

491. The Duke of Chevreuse to the Duke of Buckingham. Letter of compliment.

492. The Duke of Chevreuse to the Duke of Buckingham. Letter of compliment.

493. Charles Emmanuel, Duke of Savoy, to the Duke of Buckingham. Letter of compliment.

494. M. de Bautru to the Duke of Buckingham. Expresses his satisfaction at his proceedings.

495. Abbate de la Scaglia to the Duke of Buckingham. Thanks him for his favours.

496. The Marquis of Effiat to the Duke of Buckingham. Acquaints him with his appointment as intendant des finances.

497. The Duke of Buckingham to Frederick, ex-King of Bohemia. Sir D. Carleton will communicate to him what he has to say.

498. The Duke of Buckingham to the Prince of Orange. Sir D. Carleton will tell him his resolution about the voyage on which he is entering.

499. The Duke of Buckingham [?] to the Prince of Conde\ Has taken no part in what His Majesty has done with respect to his affairs.

500. James I. or Charles I. to the Count of Joinvillo. The horses bought for him in England were justly confiscated. An attempt was made to export them without a license.

501. Lord Ruthin to [the Duke of Buckingham ?]. The Queen's cough is so bad that she could not answer His Majesty's letter.

502. Examination of witnesses about some land at Blackfriars.

503. The Duke of Chevreuse to the Duke of Buckingham. Recommends Mr. Chisholm.

504. List of Knights of the Order of the Saint Esprit.

505. Charles I. to [Prince Rupert]. Sends news of his victory over the Earl of Essex, and information about the position of the troops.

506. The Earl of Clarendon to the Duke of York. On the supposed intention of the Duchess to change her religion.

507. The Earl of Clarendon to the Duchess of York. On the same subject.

Foutainebleau.

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Collection Ojf MSS. And Pamphlets Belonging To Sib Chables W. Dilke, Babt., M.P., At 76, Sloane Stbeet.

Sir Charles Dilke possessed till quite recently a large collection of MSS. and pamphlets. The former he has now transferred to the British Museum. They form three collections known respectively as the Carryll Papers, the Seaforth Papers, and the Mackenzie Papers. The pamphlets remain in his possession, and it is

believed contain matter which would be found highly interesting to the student of modern English history. They fall into eight groups :—

(1.) Pamphlets relating to the escape of Charles II. after the battle of Worcester.

(2.) Relating to the events of James PL's reign.

(3.) Relating to the intrigues of the Jacobites during the reign of William and Mary, and of Anne.

(4.) Relating to the risings under the old Pretender and the young Pretender in 1715 and 1745.

(5.) Relating to the life and times of Alexander Pope.

(6.) Relating to the political career of Wilkes, and the writings of Junius. These two collections are considered to be very complete.

(7.) Relating to the life of Mr. Burke.

(8.) Relating to the political history of Ireland, and the rebellion of 1798.

These collections were formed by the late Mr. Dilke, grandfather of the present Baronet.

Edmond Fitzmaubice.

Sib Henby Dbi'den, Babt., Of Canons Ashby, Co. Northampton.

Sir Henry Dryden possesses a number of letters of the 17th and 18th centuries, addressed to or written by members of the Dryden family.

There is only one letter by the poet. This is ad dressed to W. Walsh (author of a Dissertation on Virgil's Pastorals), and is a reply to a request for a criticism on his Es3ay. Dryden tells him to avoid shan't and can't, not to end a sentence with a preposition, and not to say that when who is proper.

A large proportion of the letters are on business and purely family matters; from the others I made notes.

1640, Nov. 26—Westminster. Sir John Dryden writes to his uncle Richard Knightley, that he shall have his prayers, tho' he can not be so serviceable either to him or the country that hath set him (Dryden) in that place of trust. He can only bring straw or stubble to that great work. God be praised, here want not skilful agents for this great work; it hitherto goeth

on fast The walls go up fast tho' they can not be

suddenly finished; the ruines be such, both in Church and Commonwealth, that some years will hardly repair all breaches. I suppose that tho petitions that come from several counties will take up some weeks, if not months, and then you may suppose what time they will take up in the thorough reformation of the grievances. The great business of the week has been the raising of the 100.000Z. for the maintenance of the King's army and the relief of the northern counties. The money is borrowed, some part from the city of London; 50.000J. is offered to be lent by one Mr. Hamson, one of the fermors of the Customs; for so many thousand pounds that shall be lent they are to be secured by bond of some gentlemen of the House until the Act be passed, and then the gentlemen are to have in their bonds. Yesterday the great charge the House of Commons has against the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, was delivered to the Lords in the Painted Chamber by Mr. Pim. "This day is appointed to displant the cannons of the "late sinod with their unlegal oath. Saturday for ship "money."

1656, June 16—Ashby. Sir John Dryden to (apparently some apothecary in London), respecting the illness of his son Richard.

1656, August 17—Ashby. Sir John Dryden to Sir John Trevor at his house in Channel Roe, Westminster. He has appointed John Pasmore, the bearer, to the parsonage of Chesterton, co. Hunts, and asks Sir J. Trevor to recommend him to Mr. Nye or some other of the Commissioners for the approbation of ministers. In a postscript he thanks Sir J. Trevor for favour shown to his kinsman at Westminster school.

1655, July 14. William Driden to his brother Sir John. "My nephew Driden is in election of a fair, "virtuous lady."

1655, July 23. John Hewett to his uncle Sir John Dryden, respecting the disposal of some "household stufFe" in which they were jointly interested, and an offer by Lord Manchester to purchase it.

1656, Oct. 9. Richard Dryden to his father Sir John. Asks pardon for an offence, and in a postsoript asks for "a new sute and coat." •

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