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Lesson I.—Extracts from Bower, 256; the Treuga Doi, 257, 258; Bishop England quoted

on the action and records of the Church, 259, 260.

Lessox II.—Establishment of Christianity by law, by Constantine, and the rise of Moham-

medanism, 261, 262; the schism of the Greek Church, 263, 264.

Lesson III.-Nature swarming with life, and life merging in distress and death, 264, 265;

sin the cause of slavery, and the latter as a protection, 266, 267; slavery in China, 269.

Lesson IV.–Liberty of less value than life, 270; the Divine grant to hold slaves, 271.

Lesson V.—Early church acts and documents approving and providing for slavery, 272 ;

the canons and the constitutions of the apostles, 272 to 274; constitution of Antoninus

Pius respecting cruelty to slaves, 275; canons of the Council of Nice and the first

appearance of abolitionism in the world, 276, 277; St. Basil's canonical writings, 278.

Lesson VI.— The invasion of Attila and the Pontiff Leo's successful intercession, 279,

280; Nero's African slaves, and the white slaves of the Roman Empire, 281.

LESSON VII.—Church rescripts for the freedom of slaves, and St. Augustin's mode of

manumission in Africa, 282, 283; Pope Leo's letters, forbidding slaves to enter the

priesthood, and protecting the rights of masters, 284, 285; barbarian cruelty to slaves

ameliorated by Christianity, 286, 287; canons of the Council of Agdle on slavery, 288;

modes of becoming slaves, 289, 290.

Lesson VIII.-Muratori on the manumission of slaves in Rome, 291; colonial and con-

ditional slaves, 292; arming of slaves in defence of Rome and the glutting of the

slave-markets of the world, 293; canons of the Fourth Council of Orleans, 294, 295;

ditto Fifth Council of Orleans, 296 to 299.

Lesson IX.-Bishop England's account of slavery in England and Ireland in remote

ages, 299, 300; Pope Pelagius and the canons of the Third Councils of Paris and

Braga, 301, 302; articles of the Third Council of Toledo, 302, 303.

Lesson X.—The venerable Bede's account of the slave-trade of England, A. D. 577, 304

to 306; Pope Gregory's purchase of British youth, 306, 307; Gregory's pastoral ad-

monitions and epistles, 308 to 311.

Lesson XI.—Constantine's edict that none but Christians could hold slaves, 212, 213;

Gregory's letter to the Præfect of Sicily, 313 to 315; canons of the Fourth Councils

of Orleans and Macon, 315, 316; Gregory to the Bishop of Luna, and the laws of the

empire on slavery, 317, 318.

Lesson XII.—Gregory to the Bishop of Naples, 319, 320; the same to the Bishop of Ca-

tania, 321.

LESSON XXII.—Origin of the Sclavonians, 381; the descent of the Arabs and Moors,

383, 384.

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