HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES, FROM THE DISCOVERY OF THE AMERICAN CONTINENT.

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Anxious as to the Bavarian succession 105 Makes approaches
109
His opinion of Englands position after the defeat of Burgoyne 113
115
Bunker Hill 120 In retreating to Halifax 120 On Long Island 121
121
Divides his army 121 His waste of time 121 His winter in Philadel
122
Intrigue of Lee 127 Washington pursues the British army 128
129
Dismissed by Congress 134 Character 134 Death 134Carvers
135
Change in the American mind 140 In the English mind 140 Opin
141
Congress receives the French minister 147Sullivan lands on Rhode
148
Their menaces 151Their conduct condemned in the house of commons
151
SPAIN AND THE UNITED STATES 1778
159
Asks of France her conditions of peace 166 Weymouth rejects
166
Certificates of debt 170Unprotected bills of exchange 170 Rate
174
the Americans 176Impracticable plan for emancipating Canada 176
176
He observes the attachment of the United States to England
182
Gouverneur Morris 183 Of Jay 183 Vergennes on the American gov
189
Clark at Redstone 194 At Louisville 195Schemes of Hamilton
196
Further merits of the backwoodsmen 201 Expedition under Evan Shelby
202
sissippi
212
Counter argument of Vergennes 211 French minister endeavors to per
213
Stormy debate on the fisheries 218 The French minister endeavors to
220
CHAPTER XXIII
222
Matthews predatory expedition 223 Retaliation of the Virginia legisla
226
the country of the Onondagas 230 Sullivan appointed to command
231
American independence fixed 235 America will establish a strong gov
239
At East Haven 226At Fairfield 226 At Norwalk 227 Address
241
British cabinet seeks aid from Russia 241 Eeport of the English ambas
245
Combined fleet disperses 250Dejection in France 250 Maria Theresa
252
THE ARMED NEUTRALITY 17781780
255
merce from the American commissioners 261 Neglect and silence of
264
Conflicting aggressions of France and England in the Netherlands
270
Autograph letter of George III to Catharine 273 Harris offers
281
THE WAR IN THE SOUTHERN STATES 17781779
283
His previous life 287 Movements of the new commander 287 Repulse
293
His code 347 George III 347 Means of bringing slavery
349
In Virginia 354 Memorable words of Mason 354 Slavery
356
Draft of a plan of government 362 Disfranchisement 362 Work
362
Its convention declares the state a free republic 364 Committee to draft
368
Retreat of the British 374 Committee of congress in camp 374 Clinton
374
Clinton embarks troops 383 Andre on board the Vulture
383
History of West Point 385 Interview of Washington with Rochambeau
392
emissions of paper money 398 Henry Laurens sent to negotiate a loan
398
Answer of Jones 404 Action of congress to obtain men and money
405
John Adams on the powers of congress 408 Conventions
411
great officers of state 412 Relies to excess on a bank of the United States
413
Comparison of France and the United States 418 Measure to enable
423
His answer to the complaints of the Dutch 426 Mariotts
431
Yorke presents Stormonts memorial 436 Its reception by the Dutch
437
of Stormont for the punishment of the Amsterdam offenders 438
438
Neckers letter to Lord North 444 Vergennes on Necker
444
Americas need of money 446 Advice of Washington 446Complaints
452
THE SOUTHERN CAMPAIGN BATTLE OP GUILFORD COURTHOUSE
468
Junction of the American army at Guilford courthouse 472 Greenes
474
Pickens routs a body of loyalists under Pyle 474Cornwallis strives
480
to Germain 484 Germain instructs Clinton to further the plan of a cam
485
Greene at the high hills of Santee 493 Rawdon sails for England
492
CAMPAIGN IN VIRGINIA 1781
499
Flight of Steuben 505 Cornwallis at Elk Hill 505 At Williamsburg
505
CHAPTER XXVI
526
old whigs 532 Union of Shelburne and Rockingham alone able to estab
535
quer Jamaica 538 Concentrates its energies on the recovery of Gibral
540
The cabinet offers independence directly to America as the condition
548
Franklin proposes the American conditions of peace 554
554
covers Georgia 563 His conduct at Sharon 563 Evacuation of Savan
567
Morriss budget for 1783 571 Proposal of Madison to empower congress
573
tons opinion 578 Agitation of the king 578 Jay and De Aranda
579
Old debts still valid 585Refusal of indemnity to
588

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Página 125 - The idea of dependence is inadmissible. Congress will be ready to enter upon a treaty of peace and commerce, when the king of Great Britain shall demonstrate a sincere disposition for that purpose by an explicit acknowledgment of the independence of these states, or withdrawing his fleets and armies." The American officers were of the same mind, except
Página 365 - possessing, and protecting property ; in fine, that of seeking and obtaining their safety and happiness." The lawyers of Virginia had not considered this declaration as of itself working the emancipation of negro slaves; to accomplish that end, the men of Massachusetts, in deciding how many of their old laws should remain in full force, excepted those parts which CHAP, were " repugnant to the rights and liberties contained
Página 209 - that as neither France nor these United States may of right, so they will not conclude either truce or peace with the common enemy, without the formal consent of their ally first obtained." The conditions on which it was most difficult for 1 Writings of Washington, ed.
Página 585 - 2 tion, that it was definitively established in the treaty 29." itself. On the north-west it was agreed that the line should be drawn through the centre of the water communications of the great lakes to the Lake of the Woods. The British commissioners denied to the Americans the right of drying fish on Newfoundland.
Página 122 - When the king of Great Britain shall be seriously disposed to end the unprovoked war waged against these United States, they will readily attend to such terms of peace as may consist with the honor of independent nations and the sacred regard they mean to pay to treaties." On the day of this second rejection of Lord North's offers,
Página 570 - Morris, who saw the transcendent importance of the act of the New York legislature, welcomed the young statesman to his new career in these words : " A firm, wise, manly system of federal government is what I once wished, what I now hope, what I dare not expect, but what I will not despair of.
Página 142 - The king, in January, 1778, confessed to Lord North : " The time may come when it will be wise to abandon all North America but Canada, Nova Scotia, and the Floridas ; but then the generality of the nation must see it first in that light/
Página 395 - I have ordered in the most positive manner that every militia-man who has borne arms with us and afterwards joined the enemy shall be immediately hanged. ' ' By militiamen were meant alike officers and privates, of whatever
Página 115 - The king desires that your generous efforts may be crowned with complete success. He will not hesitate to recognise your independence, when France, which is more directly interested in the event of this contest, shall have given the example." 3 1 Schulenburg to Wm. Lee, 3 2 Schulenburg to Arthur Lee
Página 523 - and to de Grasse, with special thanks to the officers and troops. A marble column was to be erected at Yorktown, with emblems of the alliance between the United States and his most Christian Majesty.

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