Modern Painters ...

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J. Wiley & sons, 1879

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Índice

Ultimate conclusions universal
22
How rewarded
23
Errors induced by the power of habit
24
The large scope of matured judgment
25
The danger of a spirit of choice
26
And criminality
27
With what liabilities to error
28
The term beauty how limitable in the outset Divided into typical and vital
29
Of False Opinions held concerning Beauty 1 Of the false opinion that truth is beauty and vice versa
30
Of the false opinion that beauty is usefulness Compare Chap xii 5
31
But never either creates or destroys the essence of beauty
32
Of the false opinion that beauty depends on the association of ideas
33
Association accidental The extent of its influence
34
The dignity of its function
35
How it is connected with impressions of beauty
36
First of Infinity or the Type of Divine Incomprehensibility 1 Impossibility of adequately treating the subject
38
The child instinct respecting space
39
Continued in after life
40
Infinity how necessary in art
41
Conditions of its necessity
42
How the dignity of treatment is proportioned to the expres sion of infinity
43
Examples among the Southern schools
44
Among the painters of landscape
45
The beauty of curvature
46
The beauty of gradation
47
How necessary in Art
48
Infinity not rightly implied by vastness
49
Of Unity or the Type of the Divine Compre hensiveness 1 The general conception of divine Unity
50
The several kinds of unity Subjectional Original Of sequence and of membership
51
Unity of membership How secured
52
Variety Why required
53
Change and its influence on beauty
54
The love of change How morbid and evil
55
And towards unity of sequence
57
The value of apparent proportion in curvature
60
How by nature obtained
61
Error of Burke in this matter
62
Constructive proportion Its influence in plants
63
And animals
64
Of Repose or the Type of Divine Perma nence 1 Universal feeling respecting the necessity of repose in art Its sources
65
Of Symmetry or the Type of Divine Justice
72
Of Moderation or the Type of Government
81
First as Relative
89
plants
92
This sympathy is unselfish and does not regard utility
93
Especially with respect to animals
94
And it is destroyed by evidences of mechanism
95
The second perfection of the theoretic faculty as concerned with life is justice of moral judgment
96
How impeded
97
As also in plants
99
Recapitulation
100
Secondly as Generic 1 The beauty of fulfilment of appointed function in every animal
101
The two senses of the word ideal Either it refers to ac tion of the imagination
103
Of Ideal form First in the lower animals
104
Ideal form in vegetables
105
The inconsistency among the effects of the mental virtues on the form
116
Consequent separation and difference of ideals
117
signs of its immediate activity
118
Ideal form is only to be obtained by portraiture
119
Evil results of opposite practice in modern times
120
The right use of the model
121
Practical principles deducible
122
Portraiture ancient and modern
123
How connectedwith impurity of color
124
Or by severity of drawing
125
Rubens Correggio and Guido
126
Holy fear how distinct from human terror
127
Such expressions how sought by painters powerless and
129
Of passion generally
130
Recapitulation
131
General Conclusions respecting the Theo retic Faculty g 1 There are no sources of the emotion of beauty more than those found in things visible
133
What imperfection exists in visible things How in a sort by imagination removable
134
What objections may be made to this conclusion
135
How interrupted bv false feeling
136
Greatness and truth are sometimes by the Deity sustained and Bpoken in and through evil men
137
The second objection arising from the coldness of Christian men to external beanty
138
Reasons for this coldness in the anxieties of the world These anxieties overwrought and criminal
139
Evil consequences of such coldness
140
Of the Three Forms of Imagination
142
Of Imagination Penetrative
163
The imagination seizes always by the innermost point
164
It acts intuitively and without reasoning
165
Absence of imagination how shown
166
Fancy how involved with imagination
168
Fancy is never serious
169
Imagination is quiet fancy restless
170
And suggestive of the imagination
171
This suggest iveness how opposed to vacancy
172
Imagination addresses itself to imagination
173
The entombment
174
The Baptism of Christ Its treatment by various painters
176
By Tintoret
177
The Crucifixion
178
The Massacre of innocents
179
Various works in the Scuola di San Rocco
181
By Tintoret
182
The imaginative verity how distinguished from realism
183
The imagination how manifested in sculpture
184
Michael Angelo
185
Recapitulation The perfect function of the imagination is the intuitive perception of ultimate truth
188
Imagination how vulgarly understood
190
On independence of mind
191
Of Imagination Contemplative 1 Imagination contemplative is not part of the essence but only a habit or mode of the faculty
192
Is not in itself capable of adding to the charm of fair things
193
But gives to the imagination its regardant power over them
194
The third office of fancy distinguished from imagination con templative
195
Various instances
197
Morbid or nervous fancy
200
The act ion of contemplative imagination is not to be expressed by art
201

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Passagens conhecidas

Página 137 - And he took up his parable and said, Balaam the son of Beor hath said, and the man whose eyes are open hath said...
Página 91 - One lesson, shepherd, let us two divide, Taught both by what she shows, and what conceals • Never to blend our pleasure or our pride With sorrow of the meanest thing that feels.
Página 39 - From God who is our home. Heaven lies about us in our infancy. Shades of the prison-house begin to close Upon the growing boy; But he beholds the light and whence it flows, He sees it in his joy. The youth who daily farther from the East Must travel, still is Nature's priest, And, by the vision splendid, Is on his way attended. At length the man perceives it die away And fade into the light of common day.
Página 197 - In heaven above thee! Yet like a star, with glittering crest, Self-poised in air thou seems't to rest; — May peace come never to his nest, Who shall reprove thee! Sweet Flower! for by that name at last, When all my reveries are past, I call thee, and to that cleave fast, Sweet silent Creature ! That breath 'st with me in sun and air, Do thou, as thou art wont, repair My heart with gladness, and a share Of thy meek nature!
Página 92 - It doth not love the shower, nor seek the cold : This neither is its courage nor its choice, But its necessity in being old. " The sunshine may not cheer it, nor the dew ; It cannot help itself in its decay ; Stiff in its members, withered, changed of hue.
Página 167 - Horatio; a fellow of infinite jest, of most excellent fancy. He hath borne me on his back a thousand times; and now, how abhorred in my imagination it is! my gorge rises at it. Here hung those lips that I have kissed I know not how oft. Where be your gibes now? your gambols? your songs? your flashes of merriment, that were wont to set the table on a roar?
Página 168 - Dis's waggon! daffodils That come before the swallow dares, and take The winds of March with beauty; violets dim, But sweeter than the lids of Juno's eyes Or Cytherea's breath...
Página 132 - On every corse there stood. This seraph-band, each waved his hand: It was a heavenly sight! They stood as signals to the land, Each one a lovely light; This seraph-band, each waved his hand, No voice did they impart No voice; but oh!
Página 198 - Inaudible as dreams ! the thin blue flame Lies on my low-burnt fire, and quivers not ; Only that film, which fluttered on the grate, Still flutters there, the sole unquiet thing. Methinks its motion in this hush of Nature Gives it dim sympathies with me who live, Making it a companionable form, Whose puny flaps and freaks the idling Spirit By its own moods interprets, everywhere Echo or mirror seeking of itself, And makes a toy of Thought.
Página 5 - He hath made every thing beautiful in his time: also he hath set the world in their heart, so that no man can find out the work that God maketh from the beginning to the end.

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