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INSTITUTIONS FOR SECONDARY INSTRUCTION, CHIEFLY PRIVATE. Table 28 presents the statistics of 1,440 schools, chiefly private, which carry the instruction of their pupils beyond the elementary grade.

The general scope of these schools is perhaps best indicated by the results of a detailed analysis of the corresponding table for 1884-'85.

Out of 1,617 schools tabulated that year, the numbers reporting 25 per cent. or more of their pupils in the classical course and inodern language course, one or both, were as follows:

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In classical course......
In modern languages....
In each of the two courses, viz, classical and modern languages...............
In both courses.....

a121

25
13

a Of these, 68 are schools for young ladies. Of 326 schools which in 1884–85 reported productive funds, 106 reported $10,000 or upwards. Of these, 9 only appeared to be doing a vigorous classical work, while 7, including 3 of the 9, were strong in the modern languages.

These numbers seem to justify the conclusion that two-thirds of the schools considered are essentially English schools, while under the most liberal interpretation of the statistics not more than one-fifth can be regarded as essentially classical.

The very small percentage of the schools having permanent funde, found among those in which either classics or modern languages are prominent features, seems further to indicate the definite purpose on the part of patrons to make substantial provision for the studies that belong to an English course. This indication is strengthened by the fact that the relative status of the three courses of study has not changed materially for a period of years, comparisons made between the statistics of schools in certain States selected, which schools reported in 1884-'85 and also in 1880, giving the following results:

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a The results in Georgia aro vitiated by the fact that 2 of the 30 schools did not show the classification of all their scholars.

It will be noticed that the percentage of relative increase, for the period of years considered, in the number of scholars pursuing the English course is in the New England States.

In 18 States and 3 Territories, reported in 1884–85, co-education was a feature of three-fourths or more of the schools under consideration; in 9 States and 4 Territories it was a feature of one-half of the schools, or less than one-half, and in 11 Statesthe co-education schools numbered between one-half and three-fourths of the whole. It is therefore evident that there is no settled prejudice against co-education among those classes

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The totals show, for students in the classical course, net decrease of 357, or 14 per cent. ; in the scientific course, net increase of 346, or 49 per cent. ; in other courses, net increase of 421, or 75 per cent.

The ratio which the number of students in each of the three courses bore to each other at the respective dates is as follows:

1880.

1885-'80.

Ratio of scientific students to classical....
Ratio of scientific and classical students to others.........

Per cent. Per cent. 271

48 81

75

If these inquiries bo limited to the New England and Middle States, from which, as previously statod, the majority of tho preparatories are reported, it appears that 90 per cent. of tho net decrease in the number of students reported in the classical course and 97 per cent of the increase in the number reported in the scientific conrse juust be credited to that section. In addition to the schools reporting the distribution of students for both years the table before us includes 49 schools organized since 1880 and 49 organized prior to 1880, but not tabulated that year, which report the distribution of pupils for the current year.

The 49 schools of the former gronp report a total of 788 students in the classical conrse, 868 in the scientific, and 2,198 other or unclassified. Of the whole number of the schools here considered 29 are in the New England and Middle Atlantic States, and report the distribution of pupils as follows: Classical course, 533; scientific course, 287; other students, 1,102.“ In other words, the excess of scientific students over classical students in the schools of late date is not to be credited to the New England and Middle States. Moreover, the decrease of classical students in the schools of this section involved in the comparison of 1880 with 1005–26 is very nearly made up by the excess of classical students over scientific students in the new schools, the numbers being, respectively, 337 and 246.

The 19 schools of the second group (i. e., those organized prior to 1880 but not tabulated at that date) report totals as follows: Number of students in classical course, 42; in scientific course, 492; in other courses, 2,988.

Tere the excess of scientific students over those in the classical course for the wholo country is less than the excess reported from the schools located in the New Englanı and Middle States, the numbers being, respectively, 64 and 126.

These figures indicate an increasing demand for scientific instruction and for the preparation of young men for the snperior schools of science, which particularly alfect the preparatory schools of the New England and Middle Atlantic States.

The figures cannot, however, be held to contirm the statement repeatedly made that the ratio of students preparing for the classical conrse in college, as compared with the whole population of the New England and Middle States, is cleclining

There is ground for the belief that the increasing application of science to the arts and industries is inducing a greater pumber of young men to prolong their studies beyond the elementary stage, which in no way militates against tho idea that the

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