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325

158,

Prize essay for 1820 in Gottingen 248 Storms in Scotland

17
Pripting machine

364 Straw, a conductor for lightning 154
Proverbs about the weather
365 Strawberry, extraordinary

206
Prognostics from animals
445 Subterraneous sounds in rocks

362
from vegetables
482 Suicides in Paris

358
Pulpit Eloquence
53 Sunday in Paris

226
Pupil without hands

84 Superstition

33, 152, 244
Pyroligueous acid
84,248 Surprising feat of a climber

204
Swammerdam's microscopes

149
Red soow

84
Swallow

154
Rees' Cyclopedia, last ngmber 248 Swimming exploits

89
Relics of Popular Superstitions

64
Remarkable association

280 Tales of the Hall compared with other
Rembrandt's workshop

140
poems

128
Repartee

270 Tales of to-day

129, 215, 307, 369
Researches on ancient history, Voloey 248 Tales and historic scenes in verse 260
Respiration in frogs
398 Tales, by the authorof Bertram

288
Revolutionary coincidences

285 Tales of my landlord, 4th series disputed 403
Ridiculous anger
306 Tartarian liberality

227
River Jordan
483 Tea plant

449
Robbers

Temper

146
Roberts the poe

464 Theocritus, Polwhele's translation 456
Rogers the poet, biography of
480 The case is altered”

227
Rousseau

305 Thesaurus of horror, or charnel-house
explored

49
Safe coach, patent

45

Time's magic lanthern, No. I. 79, No.
Sagacity of a shepherd's dog 95, 134

11.92, No. III. 140, No. IV. 262
Salame's Algerine narrative

169
Salathe's captivity

Tiger and lion hunt in lodia

13
417, 453

Tour through America, by Milbert 82
Salt

269
Tour to Paris, in 1818

31
Savings bank in London

206
Travels round my chamber

375
Scenes in Asia

483

Trade of the United States with China 25
Schleusner's lexicon, new edition

84
Trees, their growth, &c.

245
Schools, corporal punishments in

197
Scott, Walter, a visit to him

Tyrolese, character and manners of 249, 311

41, 226, 397
Scarce tracts

420

Usurers, their dreadful punishments 33, 71
Sculpture and painting

163, 198
Sedeno, general

241 Varieties

203, 244, 325, 482
Sermons by the rev. C. Maturin 245 Vaucluse and the unfortunate lovers 318
Selden the divine
84 Venice in 1819

409
Shakspeare jubilee
483 Venice, descriptive letter from

120
Shepherd of Banbury's rules
404 Velocipedes

46
Shepherd's Calendar, by J. Hogg 17

Visit to Walter Scott

41
Shelburne, the marquis, anecdote of 94 Visit to tbe Geyser in Iceland

329
Singular omission

226

Visit to the monastery of La Trappe 449
Singular effects of the sea at great depths 451 Volcanoes

461
Singular Chinese tradition

483
Singular accident
364 Walking mountain at Namur

82
Signs of inns

183
Wasp-Eater

327
Sir Christopher Hatton in London 129

Watt, James, the improver of the steam
Sketches of a tour to Paris

31
engine

274
Sketches of manners - 146, 181, 277 Water, fresh and salt, in one well 206
Skull of Robert the Bruce
401 Weather io England

85
South American customs

388 Weighing an anchor, new method 123
Southey's Brazil
388 Wellington's dessert service

288
Stewart, general

85 Wesley's life, by Southey, notice of 288
Stereotype bank-notes

284 Wheat, extraordinary increase of a grain 125
Stones in the human frame
242 “ Wildgoose chase” explained

130
story of Shakrak and the magician 479 Winter evening tales

248

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Winter
Witch hazel, or divining rod
Wolsey's palace
Woman's character, by several poets

288 Women, their influence & high character 199
180 Wood in Scotland

245
157
184 Young Arthur, or child of mystery 231

POETRY.

Acrostic receipt for a poem
Adieu, romance's heroines
Alas, bow little man can guess
Apiovocation
Agtamo triumphant

Ballad by a mother
(The) Barefooted Friar
(The) Belvidere Apollo
Bridal dancers
(The) Bride
Broken heart, a poem, by Cornwall

168 Legend of the passion flower and sprite 231
328 Let merry spring enjoy her flowers 168
168 Like the oak of the vale
167
Lines to the planet Jupiter

87
168 ----- by Barry Cornwall

87
-----on the birth-day of a lady
47

-- from the German of Prince Louis 127
488
-- to a lady, with a wreath

196
286
-- on human happiness

163
458
-- on a new made grave

165
207
.- to the author's mother

94:
23
-- to Nea

997
-- to Genevieve
287

- to the inisses L. by Campbell
208

-- When the bloom on thy cheek 367
488

Lo! madness like a sun o'erclad with blood 487
Lorenzo de'Medicis

357
47
Love's Gift

366
48

Carrier's address to his patrons.
(The) Comparison
(The) Crusader's return

Dirge of Dargo
(To my) Dog

Elegy on an idiot girl
(The) Everlasting rose
Epitaph on Elizabeth Wood

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Female convict's address to her infant
Flora's bower
From my slumber I woke

246 Negro's lament for Mungo Park 447
127
Nemean lion

458
47

Now spring returns, but not to me returns 469

(The) Glow-worm to the moon

208
Oh when shall I sec

86
O lady, wear this wreath for me

126
Hail to thy hues, thou lovely flower 46 Oo Carmel's brow the wreathy vine 126
Heard ye the arrow burtle in the sky 286 Origin of the red rose

88
Hebrew melodies, by J. Hogg 88, 126 O saw ye the rose of the east

88
Hastings, upon thy coast I stood 86 Osleep not, my babe

218
High deeds achieved of knightly fame 488
Home, sweet home
48 Ranz de Vaches imitated

86
Ho, Swiss, arise
48 Rebecca's hymn

487
Hymn, by C. Dibdin

88 Requiem to Burns
Hymn for the female friendly society

217

368
(To the) Snow drop

487
Icelander's song
408 (The) Soldier in Egypt

47
If at this silent midnight hour
167 Song---Did ye see the red rose

327
I looked on thee, Jove, till my gaze
87 Song from the German of Gleim

207
In every copse and sheltered dell 482 Song---O lovely is the morning calm

448
I pity you, ye stars so bright

408 Song---Summer may spread her choicest 198
Inscription on the great Ampthill oak 208

Sonnet to a tea-kettle
Joyous berald of the spring

487 (The) Spectre

208
488

Spring, from the Spanish
Spirit ofthe storm, lines by J. Hogg
Storm aod subsequent calm
Sweet be thy rest Dear holy shrine
(To the) Swiss

The last but one
The night was glory
There is an eye that all surveys
There is a bond that spirits know
The seed-time is past, and the barvest is

o'er
The soul that inwardly is fed
The southern may talk of his meads
The summer sun was sinking

448 The Tuilleries

408
22 Translations from the Welsh stanzas 359
458 Translation of a fragment of Simonides 447
168
48 Wassail, wassail, all over the town 284
(The) Waves

86
246 Well, peace to that heart, tho' another's
87
it be

287
87 We met, a hundred of us met

207
167 When I gaze on these green fields 207

When Israel of tbe Lord beloved 487
287 Who, helpless, hopeless being, who 127
127 Who is the sleeping youth that lies 127
408
47
Ye pugilists of England

448

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HOLY WARS.

From the Monthly Magazine, July 1819.
ACCOUNT of newly-discovered An- Moses), with engravings of the draw-

TIQUITIES in Arabia Petræa, ings which he made of the hitherto-un-
derived from the personal in- described excavated temples there ; ag
spection of a recent British trav- well as of the ruins of Jerrasch, which
eller.

excel in grandeur and beauty even those W:

THEN the graphic illustrations of of Palmyra and Balbec.
the ruins of Palmyra, by Wood

This gentleman, in company with and Dawkins, made their appearance, rusalem for Hebron, where they viewed

several other English travellers, left Jethe public received them as surprising the mosque erected over the tomb of discoveries; so little had the western regions of Asia been visited by Euro

Abraham; an edifice constructed in pean travellers after the time of the

the lower part of such enormous massSince the publication of es of stone, (many of them upwards of those enterprising artists

, scarcely any twenty feet in length,) that it must be important addition has been made to

ascribed to that remote age in which their information : for the Travels of durability was the principle chiefly conDr. Clarke are too much interwoven sulted in the formation of all edifices of

the with speculative dissertations to be trus

monumental kiod. ted on all occasions ; nor did he deviate

They then proceeded to Karrac, so far from the common tracks of the through a country broken into bills and caravans, as to have it in his power ma

pinnacles of the most fantastic form, and terially to enlarge our koowledge, even

along the foot of mountains, where fraghad be been sufficiently free from bypo- ments of rock-salt indicated the natural thetical opinions to have done so to ad- origin of that intense brine, which is pevantage. But we bave now reason to culiarly descriptive of the neighbouring expect, that the world will soon be grat

waters of the Dead Sea. ified with still more striking illustrations

KARRAC is a fortress situated on the of other and MORE SUPERB ANTIQUI,

The entrance is formed ties than those which it owes to Wood by a winding passage, cut through the and Dawkins.

living rock. It may be described, like Mr. Bankes, who has visited some

all the other castellated works in the of the most celebrated scenes in Arabia, possession of the professors of the Maintends, we understand, to publish, on

homedan religion, as a mass of ruins. his return home, an account of his ex

The mosque is in that state; and a cursiop to Wadi Moosa (the valley of church which it also contains, as well as B ATHENRUM VOL. 6.

the ancient keep or citadel, are in a sim

top of a hill.

ilar condition. In the vicinity, the but be returned for answer, that they travellers saw several sepulchres bollow- should neither cross bis lands por taste ed out of the rock; and they found the bis water. They were in fact in the inhabitants of the place a mingled race land of Edom, to the king of which of Mahomedans and Christians, remark- Moses sent messengers from Kadish : ably hospitable, and living together in “Let us pass, (said he), I pray thee, terins of freer intercourse than at Jery- through thy country: we will not pass salem. The women were not veiled, through the fields, or through the vinepor seemed to be subject to any partic- yards; neither will we drink of the ular restraints.

waters of the well: we will go by the Mr. Bankes and his companions, af- king's highway; we will not turn to ter leaving Karrac, sojourned for a short the right hand nor to the left, until we time with a party of Bedoueen Arabs ; have passed thy borders.” But Edom by whom they were regaled with mutton said unto bim : Thou shalt not pass boiled in milk, a circumstance which by me, lest I come out against thee with will remind our readers of the command the sword.” Numbers xx. 17-18. in Exodus, chap. xxiii. v. 19 : “l'hou The travellers, after some captious shalt not seethe kid in his mother's negociation, at last obtained permission milk.” But we must not here pause to to pass; but not to drink the waters : comment on biblical antiquities. they did not, however, very faithfully

After quitting the tents of these Be observe this stipulation, for, on reaching doueens, they passed into the valley of the borders of a clear bright sparkling Ellasar, where they noticed some relics rivulet, which had oceasioned so much of antiquity, which they conjectured controversy, their horse would taste the were of Roman origin. Here again cooling freshness of its waters, and they rested with a tribe of Arabs. The Eben Raschib, their protector, insisted next day they pursued their journey, also that the horses should be gratified. partly over a road paved with lava, and On crossing this stream, they entered on which, by its appearance, was evident- the wonders of Wadi Moosa. ly a Roman work; and stopped that The first object that attracted their evening at Shubac, a fortress in a com- attention, was a mausoleum, at the enmanding situation, but incapable, by trance of which stood two colossal anidecay, of any effectual defence against mals, but whether lions or spbioxes they European tactics.

could not ascertain, as they were much In the neighbourhood of this place, defaced and mutilated. They then, they encountered some difficulties from advancing towards the principal ruins, the Arabs, but which, by their spirit and entered a narrow pass, varying from fiffirmness, they overcame; and proceed- teen to twenty feet in width, overbung ed unmolested till they reached the by precipices, which rose to the general tents of a chieftain called Eben Ras- height of two hundred, sometimes reachCHIB, who took them under his protec- ing five hundred, feet, and darkening tion.

This encampment was situated the path by their projecting ledges. In on the edge of a precipice, from which some places, niches were sculptured in they had a magnificent view of Mount the sides of this stupendous gallery, and Gebel-Nebe-Haroun, the bill of the here and there rude masses stood forprophet Aaron, (Mount Hor;) and ward, that bore a remote and mysterià distant prospect of Gebel-Tour ous resemblance to the figures of living (Mount Sinai), was also pointed out things, but over which, time and oblive to them. In the fore-ground, on the ion had drawn an inscrutable and everplain below, they saw the tents of the lasting veil. About a mile within this hostile Arabs, who were determined to pass, they rode under an arcli, perhaps oppose their passage to Wadi Moosa, that of an aqueduct, which connected the ruins of which were also in sight. the two sides together; and they notic

Perceiving themselves thus as it were ed several earthen pipes, which had forwaylaid, they sent a messenger to the merly distributed water. chief, requesting permission to pass ; Having continued to explore the

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