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JEC 15 1924 ) LIBRARY

112

115

47

91

Abstract of Lectures. -State

- Voices of Spring, 138
Asso.

302 Front Teeth and Grinders, 306
American Inst. of Instruc-

tion, 224, 255, 273 Generous Criminal, 205
Ancient Schools and Teach Give the Boys a Chance,
ers,
135 Good Books,

102
Asteroids,
44 Grave of Lyon,

366
At Rugby,

246
Baccalaureate-Extract, 272 Hard Study not Unhealthy,
Behavior of Children at Ta Home,
ble,

108 - A Better Education, 69
Be Patient with Children, 367 - and School,

33:
Be Truthful with Children, Honorary Titles for Teach-

ers,

43
“Boarding Round," 117, 145, How to Prevent Whisper-
177, 231 ing,

173
Board of Education, 313
Brougham's Tribute to

Incidents in School Life Ex-
Schoolmaster,

perience,

165
Burnham, Wm. A.,

Inducements to Circulate
Cat and Kittens,
314 Jour.,

64
Catalogues Received, 61, 94 In Honor Preferring One
Comet of 1861.
308 Another,

362
Committee Man in School, 60 | In My Library,
Common School Teachers, 207 Items, 5, 42, 43, 46, 48, 55,
-Schools, Influence of, 257, 68, 85, 89, 92, 111, 116, 128,

289, 321 133, 134, 138, 144, 147, 154,
Conjuror and Yankee, 332 156, 164, 176, 186, 199, 212,
Contrast,

296

229, 243, 244, 267, 295, 312,
Contents,

383 325, 328, 334, 361, 374, 377
Dignity of Teacher's Profes Leaf from Washington's
sion,

97 Tomb,
District Officers and School Legislature and Education,
Books,
140

346
- School IIouses, 104 Letter to School Teachers, 71
Does the Investment Pay, 353 Lord's Prayer in English, 172
Do they Teach for Money? Lyceum Eloquence, 217

136, 201, 227, 270 Mathematical Department,
Earnestness an Element of

87, 119, 152, 181
Success,
12 Mental Culture,

210
Editorial Department, 27, 122, Methods of Teaching Spell-
155, 187, 218

335
- Miscellany, 93, 123, 157, Moral Culture,

275
18., 220, 248. 286, 317, 347, Music and Heathenism, 251

376 Musings on the Triennial, 297
Elementary Studies, 15 Nature and Books,
First Organ,

188 Never be Ilaughty,
– l-aim Book, 101 : Normal Lustitie,

192

240

200

ing,

288

215

56

206

Notices of Books, &c., 32, 62,1 and Pupil,

113
94, 127, 158, 190, 221, 251, Society as an Educator, 65
319, 351, 382

Song of the Shell,

230
Obituary Notice,

32 Sound Mind in a Sound
Our Governors,
344 Body,

235
Parsing Lesson,
340 Spare Moments,

116
Patriotic Songs,

Speech,

312
Pedagogue's Experience, 21 Spring Institutes,
Physical Culture, 129, 161 State Board of Education, 313
- Geography,

132 Succeed or Die, . 86
Picture of a Vt. Village, 239 Success to the Right, 137
Politeness,

180 Schools, Influence of, 257, 289,
Prayer for Union, 328

321
Public Lectures,

54 Teachers' Associations,
Reading,

105 - Chittenden Co., 58, 192
- a Means of Culture, 268, 309 — Essex Co., 57, 149
Religion and Hypocrisy, 339 - Lamoille Co.,
- at Home,
301 - Rutland Co.,

245
Retrenchment- where be-

- State, 223, 256, 282, 302
gin,

213 - Washington Co., 125 192
Resignation,

327 Teacher's Institutes, 102, 215
Resolutions, Orleans Co., 90 Teacher's Mission,

197
Reservoirs of Water, 61 - Work,

. 13
Riches,

271 Teacher Crowned,
River of Speech,

Teachers, Speak Gently, 264
Rock me to Sleep,

169 Teaching Arithmetic, 369
Rod last Resort, 101, 142, 170, - Thoroughness in, 305

242 Teach Children to Sing,
Sabbath,

244 The Writer,
School Discipline, 52, 82, 101, Too Many Rules,

142, 170, 242 To Our Subscribers, 96
- Districts, Duties of, 9, 49 Tribute to Literature, 175
- Gymnastics, 358 True Trust,

199
- Home and,

True Teacher never Grows
- Houses,
104 Old,

48
—Legislation,

Vacation,

134
- Life, Shady and Sunny Wait a little longer, 196
Side,

33 What is the Minus Quanti-
-- or some sort of Ceme-

ty?
tery,

329 What the Poets Do, 148
- Report, Smith's, 203 What shall our Youth learn?
- Room,
37

80, 106
- That Makes Men, 100 What shall we Eat? 225, 261,
Schools, Public v. Private, 6

331
Science, its True Position, 168 Why not Advertise ? 31
Scriptures, why Given, 247 Why we have poor Schools,73
Shall Parent: accumulate Will it Pay?

139
Wealth for Children, 193 Work to do!

76
Singular Sentence, 72

Writer,

265
Sketch for Boys, Senator C., 77 Writing as a means of Cul-
Social Relation of Teacher

ture,

326

176

14

265

40

333

24

292

VERMONT

SCHOOL JOURNAL AND FAMILY VISITOR.

VOLUME III.

JANUARY, 1861.

NUMBER I.

.

НОМЕ As a source of educational influence, cannot be over estimated. It is the home of our childhood. If there is any thing sacred in memory, any thing dear to the human heart, that has felt its inspiring influence, any thing that baffles eulogy, it is the genius of home. If there is any thing that stirs up the deep fountains of the soul and holds its willing victim spell-bound and silent, it is the melody of “Sweet Home."

It must follow, therefore, that a healthful home influence has an untold power for good in the formation of character. Such was the Puritan home of New England. We know of no model that compares with it. No matter how homely and uncomfortable that cabin which was the home of the Puritan family-it was their earthly paradise. Its rough walls shielded them from the northern blasts, its blazing fire upon the sacred hearth-stone shed upon them its genial light and heat. This family was a circle unbroken by discord. Harmony and confidence robed in purity, dwelt there. Parental and filial affection shed over them their genial influence from day to day and year to year. In the Puritan family each member 'occupied the place assigned by Heaven. The father at the head was revered and obeyed as counsellor and judge, yet loved as parent and friend. The mother “opened her mouth in wisdom and in her tongue was the law of kindness.” In counsel and discipline, the father and

mother always harmonized. In efficient moulding influence the mother was undoubtedly the superior, and the more so, because she acted in ber own sphere, and faith. fully discharged her own peculiar duties. Said John Quincy Adams, " for what I am and for what I have done, I am chiefly indebted to my mother.” Yet, we all know that the mother of John Quincy Adams was the wife of the venerable president of the United States in the perilous times of our country's history, and he not only ruled the nation, but in his own household.

The children in the Puritan family were in subjection. Thoy revered and honored those whom God had placed over them. It is said of the children of the distinguished Dr. Edwards, that they were accustomed to rise , as a mark of respect, when the fa:her entered the room. Happy, indeed, is such a family and happy the influence that is brought to bear upon the forming mind, in the midst of such relations. And we would not forget that there, too, was found the old family Bible. There stood the family altar, erected not to an “unknown God," but to the God that made the Heavens and the earth. There worship was no unmeaning ceremony, but the homage of grateful and humble hearts.

The chief sources of beneficial family influence, are two, viz: supreme authority maintained by the parents, and the power of correct principles and good example. It was thought to be indispensable in the Puritan family that the parent rule and the child obey. Elec would not the pupil rise up in rebellion against the master? Would not the citizen refuse obedience to the laws of the land ? Would not the immortal, accountable being trifle with the authority of Heaven? The Paritan father and mother believed what we believe, that no greater calamity can befal the child than to be left to grow up unrestrained by proper authority. Hence, obedience must be secured at iny necers.ry expense-by mildness or severity, by the power of love, or the evangelical rod. To theee art!est

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