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BOOK FAIR

EDITORIAL. PAGE.
The Convention and the Fair............ ... 6
An Index to the Reform... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Arrangements for the Convention.......... 6

Platform of Cincinnati Convention......... 8
American Book Trade Association Officers, 8

American Book Trade Constitution........ 9
Platform of Put-in-Bay Convention......... 9
Signers of 20 per cent Rule................ Io
Publishers' Board of Trade................ II
Book Exchange and Clearing-House....... 12
CONTRIBUTORS.
Adams, Victor & Co. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
American News Co. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . cover, 22-24
Anderson & Cameron........... -- - - - - - - - - - I21
Appleton, D. & Co............ . . . . . . . . . . 64, 65
Authors' Publishing Co.................... I22
Baker, Pratt & Co. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . cover
Barnes, A. S. & Co.............. . . . . . . . . . . 32
Brown, Edw. E. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . 117
Bullock, A. B. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II.8
Burnet, Robert. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
Carter, Dinsmore & Co. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
Cassell, Petter & Galpin.......... . . . . . . . . . 49
Catholic Publication Society.............. 68, 69
Chamberlin, Whitmore & Co............... I21
Clark & Maynard. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Claxton, Remsen & Haffelfinger.......... 86, 87
Collins & Bro. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Crocker, S. R. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IO4
Dodd & Mead. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89–96
Dodge, Collier & Perkins.................. II5
Dutton, E. P. & Co... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66, 67
Ford, J. B. & Co. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3I
Gill, Wm. F. & Co. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Graves, A. F. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Hale, E. J. & Son. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Happy Hours Co................... . . . . . . . 29
Harper & Bros. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78–81
Holt, Henry & Co........................ 33
Hurd & Houghton. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5O, 51
Jansen, McClurg & Co. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
Kelly, Piet & Co.......................... IoS
Lee, Shepard & Dillingham................ 4
Lee & Shepard............ .... ..... 70–72, 128
Liebenroth, Von Auw & Co............... 117
Lippincott, J. B. & Co................... 98, 99
Literary News........................ . . . . I27

SUPELEMENT.

PAGE
Literary World........................... IO4
Little, Brown & Co........................ 30
Lockwood, Brooks & Co................... 39
Lothrop, D. & Co......................... 28
McKinney, H. N. & Co...................Ioz
Macmillan & Co........................ I4-2I
Manhattan Book Co....................... 118
Methodist Book Concern.................. 6I
Miller, James........... ................. 84
Nelson, Thos. & Sons............. ....... 82
Nelson & Phillips......................... *61
Nichols & Hall............ .............. I05
Osgood, Jas. R. & Co................... 62, 63
Patterson, F. B. ... ... ......... ...... 35, IO2
Peterson, T. B. & Bros.................... 85
Porter & Bainbridge....................... II9
Porter & Coates.................... cover, 1-3
Potter, Ainsworth & Co....... ........... 103
Prang, L. & Co....................... 106-II4
Preble, J. Q. & Co........................ 12.I.
Publishers' Weekly..................... cover
Putnam's, G. P. Sons....... .............. 38
Randolph, A. D. F. & Co............ . . . . . 36
Roberts Bros...................... . . . . . . . 25
Roman, A. & Co......... .......... . . . . 56
Routledge, Geo. & Sons.................. 52-55
Sabin, J. & Sons....................... IOO, IOI
Scribner, Armstrong & Co........ ....... 40
Scribner, Welford & Armstrong... ...... 73-77
Sheldon & Co........................ 129-138
Shriver, T. & Co......................... 116
Sneider, Robert........................ II6
Stationers' Hand-Book........... . . . . . . . . I26
Somerby, Chas. P............... . . . . . . . . . I22
Stevens, Geo. E. & Co...... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IO4
Taintor Bros. & Co...................... . 88
Taylor, Martin............................ IO4
To Dealers in School-Books............... 123
Tompkins, Kilbourne. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IO2
Uniform Trade-List Annual............ I24, I25
United States Publishing Co... .......... Io9
University Publishing Co.................. 88
Van Everen, P. F. ........................ I2O
Virtue & Yorston............ .. - - - - - - - - - - 97
Warren & Wyman......................... 69
Widdleton, W. J. ....................... 57–60
Wiley, J. & Sons..................... . . . . . VSA
World Publishing House. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .*S, on

Worthington, R. & Co. . . . . . . . . . . -- - - - - - - Avo-AS
The Convention and the Fair.

Book Fair Supplement.

If nothing else had been done in the year and a half since a few " reformers" met at Cincinnati and set on foot the first general organization of the American book trade, than to get the trade together as by all signs it is coming together, at the Niagara Convention and the New-York Fair, an important work would nevertheless have been accomplished. There is no trade which more needs that enthusiasm for work which comes of feeling that you are one of a great host that is working, shoulder to shoulder, to do something in the worldAnd the something which the bookseller has to do is a very important something. He is right hand to the author's brain. In getting people to read books, he is doing them true service, and the trade is thus fulfilling the patriotic duty of educating the community, at the same time that it is earning its bread and butter. Perhaps, until the reform is consummated, we had better say simply its bread.

Now, there is no doubt that the quantity and quality of books sold depends, in considerable measure, upon how hard and how wisely the bookseller tries to sell them. If he isn't interested in his business, if he finds it's " no use to try," the books won't be sold. Some people will buy any way; but many others will not. Some of the wisest heads in the trade believe that the book business could be almost doubled in this country if retailers were as bright as they might be, under a wholesome trade feeling and policy. The trade in books bears no comparison to that in an article of mere luxury, such as jewelry. The first important step is to get the trade together, so that it may know and feel its unity.

We have high hopes from the wisdom of the Niagara Convention, to which we look for action that will make bookselling pay. This accomplished, the Book Fair is a grand means for keeping the trade alive to its work. The first one is, of course, an experiment. It may not be at the best time of the year, or there may be other defects in the first planning. But these will correct themselves. Its idea is thoroughly good, and we believe it will, however modified, become a permanent feature of the trade. It has already accomplished a positive good in doing away with the trade sales, which

were demoralizing and should never be revived. The retailer is no longer tempted, by the hasty chance of a " bargain," to buy three or four times as many copies as he can place, and to lock up his capital in them on his shelves. He can buy cautiously and knowingly, and balance his stock as he should. And, ultimately, we expect the Fair to be acknowledged the great event of the year to the whole trade,, and a means of inspiration to it to do its best "all the year round." So we welcome all to the Convention and the Fair.

An Index to the Reform.

We give below, for present reference, an index to the numbers of the Publishers' Weekly in which the important papers in relation to the reform are to be found:

Report of the Cincinnati Convention, Feb. lath, 13th, 1874 No. no, Feb. 21st, 1874.

Report of Put-in Bay Convention, July ai-33d, 1874, including organization of A. B. T. A. and Western Booksellers (Jobbers') Association, Supplement.

No. 134, Aug. 8th, 187

Organization of the Central Booksellers' Association, with constitution, etc No. 14a, Oct. 3d, 1874.

First Regular Meeting of C. B. A.-No. 144, Oct. 17th, 1874.

Publishers' Board of Trade, 20 per cent rule.

No. 147, Nov. 7th, 1874.

Boston Meeting, extra No. 149, Nov. 21st, 1874.

Report of Committee on Book Fair.. No. 160, Feb. 6th, 1875.

Central Booksellers' Association Meeting, with Lippincott correspondence, report of Philadelphia meeting, and list of signatures to 20 per cent rule ; supplement.

No. 162, Feb. 20th, 1875.

Lippincott " new basis" No. 167, Mar. 27th, 1875.

Article on German Book Exchange..No. 168, April 3d, 1875.

Report of Committee on Assemblies, reply to Lippincott platform, and letter of" Facts" on ^ The Business Morality of Underselling" No. 170, April 17th, 1875.

Arrangements for the Convention.

The Committee on Assemblies give notice that the Convention will be opened Tuesday afternoon, July 13th, at 3 o'clock, with an address by President Randolph. Arrangements have been made to hold the general meetings in the Pavilion, Prospect Park, near the Falls, at a single entrance-fee of twenty-five cents for each member for the whole time. During convention week there will be special meetings of the law, medical, Catholic, and Sunday-school publishers, the representatives of the religious publication societies, jobbers, and any other special interests, places and time to be designated at the Convention.

Head-quarters at Niagara will beat the International Hotel, which offers the most favorable terms to members of the trade ; the Cataract and Spencer Houses also make some reduction in their terms, as does the Tifft House at Buffalo. At New-York, during the Book Fair, which it is hoped will be attended en

masse by those present at the Convention, the Grand Central Hotel will be head-quarters, at greatly reduced rates; the Metropolitan will also make some reduction. These reductions cover only the time of the Convention and Fair. The committee does not undertake to make specific arrangements as to rooms, etc., at the hotels, so that those desiring special accommodations should apply to the respective proprietors directly, by letter.

A special train for the accommodation of those attending the trade Convention, will leave New-York via the Erie Railway, on Monday evening, July 12th, by the ferry at foot of Twenty-third street, at 6.30 P.m., or foot of Chambers street at 7 P.m. Tickets for the round trip, $10, to be obtained at the ticket-office on presentation of the certificate of the Committee on Assemblies. The tickets are good on any train: but it is urged that as many as possible will avail themselves of the special train, where superior arrangements will be made for their comfort, and an opportunity for mutual acquaintance and interchange of views will be afforded. Those who expect to take this train will please notify the committee at the earliest possible moment ; and members who intend to take their families by this train will please state the accommodations required, that if a sufficient number apply a special sleeping-car may be set apart for families. Any members of the trade who prefer to leave the day before at the same hour will also please notify the Committee, and, if the number warrant, a special car will be dispatched on Sunday night also. The special train for the return will be so arranged as to afford the finest views of the glorious scenery on the Erie Railway.

No reductions by Hudson River and Central R.R. have so far been obtained, though the Albany boats issue round-trip tickets between New-York and Albany at $3 (regular rate after July 1st, $2 each way), good on either day or night line.

Those coming from the East may obtain excursion tickets to New-York via Norwich Steamboat Company, at $6 from Boston or Worcester. Unless arrangements are made later, local fares must be paid to those points.

Arrangements for the West so far made are: From Toledo and Detroit, by Canada Southern R.R., to Niagara, round trip at rate one way,— from Toledo, $8.25, on application to George B. Brown; Columbus, round trip tickets to Niagara, $13.90, good July Sth to October 31st; Cleveland, via Lake Shore R.R., round-trip tickets to Niagara at two cents per mile, good from July 12th to August 1st; Indianapolis, excursion tickets via C, C. & C. R.R. at two cents per mile; Cincinnati, excursion tickets via A. & G. W. R.R. to Niagara, thence to New-York and back, $25—see also rates via C. C. & C. R.R.; Dubuque, round trip to Chicago via Chicago, Clinton, and Dubuque R.R., $12.30, time unlimited — rates from Chicago to be announced; St. Louis, excursion tickets to Niagara, via T, W. & W. R.R., on application to Mr. Baker, at $20, good till September 1st.

Visitors from the South will find accommodations as follows: From Washington, excursion tickets to Niagara, via Pa. R.R. & Northern Central, $19.25, good till Nov. 1st—but this necessitates breaking the route to get to Book Fair; Richmond, round trip to Baltimore, via Richmond, York River & Chesapeake R.R. (in

cluding a delightful steamboat trip on Chesapeake Bay), $5—rates from Baltimore to be announced; New-Orleans, excursion tickets, via Chicago, St. Louis & N. O. R.R., to Niagara, $60, good until Oct. 1st—members may possibly do better by buying only to St. Louis; Galveston, round trip tickets, through J. E. Mason, $67.50.

This information, with particulars as to hotel rates, etc., which the Committee is not permitted to advertise publicly, is given in the invitation and circular now being distributed very widely through the trade by post ; later arrangements will be announced through the Weekly as soon as concluded. As a rule, those coming from smaller places must make individual arrangements to the centres, having previously applied for the reductions thence to the local agents of the Committee, from whom the method of obtaining these reductions must be learned. The Committee can not assist those coming and going by different routes, except between New-York and Niagara. From any place not covered by the Committee, it would advise the purchase of the general excursion tickets to Niagara offered by most of the roads at low terms.

Certificates are now being sent out by the Committee on Assemblies to all members of the trade who desire to attend the Convention and Fair. These entitle the holder to the hotel reductions, will assist him, and are in many cases necessary, to procure the special railroad rates, and give him the benefit of many reductions in the cost of sight-seeing at Niagara, besides admitting him to the Convention. They are sent free of charge to all members of the trade making application (care of The PublishErs' Weekly), and it is desired that all who can will apply before reaching Niagara.

The Committee wishes to state that it is impossible for separate answers to be made to all the detailed letters of inquiry addressed to its members, and begs that these statements may be received in lieu thereof. All members of the trade, whether members of the A. B. T. A. or not, are invited and urged to take part in the Convention, and all who desire to promote reform are asked to impress upon the trade in their vicinity the importance of being present. Extra circulars for distribution will be freely sent, if application is made. Booksellers intending to visit the Eastern trade centres during the year will find it to their interest to come now, when low hotel and railroad rates on the one hand, and the extra inducements of the Book Fair on the other, make it doubly advantageous.

LOCAL AGENTS.

Boston: William Lee, Messrs. Lee & Shepard. New-York: A. C. Barnes, Messrs. A. S.

Barnes & Co. Albany and Troy: Joseph Knight, Messrs. H. B.

Nims & Co. (Troy). Rochester: Messrs. Steele & Avery. Buffalo: Martin Taylor. Philadelphia: George Remsen, Messrs. Clax

ton, Remsen & Haffelfinger. Baltimore: John B. Piet, Messrs. Kelly, Piet &

Co. Washington: William Ballantyne. Pittsburg: S. A. Clarke & Co. Cincinnati: C. S. Bragg, Messrs. Wilson, Hin

kle & Co.

Columbus: Isaac C. Aston.

Cleveland: Ingham, Clarke & Co.

Chicago: E. L.Jansen, Messrs. Jansen, McClurg

& Co. Detroit: George H. Smith, Messrs. E. B. Smith

&Co. Milwaukee: H. H. West, Messrs. West & Co. Burlington, Iowa: Wesley Jones. Indianapolis: S. T. Bowen, Messrs. Bowen,

Stewart & Co. Dubuque: G. B. Grosvenor, Messrs. Grosvenor '& Harger.

Rock Island: R. Crampton.
St. Louis: Gray, Baker & Co.
Nashville: A. Setliff.
Dayton: A. F. Payne, Messrs. Payne, Holden

&Co.
Toledo: George Brown, Messrs. Brown &

Faunce.
New-Orleans: James A. Gresham.
Galveston: J. E. Mason.

Atlanta: F. G. Hancock, Messrs. Burke, Han-
cock & Co.
Richmond: J. T. Ellyson.
San Francisco: S. H. Bonesteel, Messrs. J. G.

Hodge & Co.

A Plan of the Fair.

As we write, Messrs. George A. Leavitt & Co. are busily at work in fitting up the commodious rooms they have secured, and assigning spaces to publishing members of the Exchange.

The temporary annexation of the Mercantile Library Reading-Room gives them the full second floor of Clinton Hall, 150x75, and here will be all the publishers. Up-stairs, a large room like the regular salesroom is reached directly from the latter, and this is to be occupied by the manufacturing stationers and chromo publishers. We hope to give, in a number previous to the Fair, a plan of the location of houses —possibly we may be able to insert it in the later copies of this supplement.

Platform

OF THE CONVENTION AT CINCINNATI, O., FEBRUARY 12-13, I874.

The American Book Trade Union, in con vention assembled, declares its belief that the interests of the public, the publisher, the jobber, and the retailer alike demand reform from the evils that now cripple the trade. Believing that the office of the bookseller is an important one in the true progress of the country, and that the interest of publishers also demands a thorough, capable, and effective distributing system which shall include retailers at every place that can support a bookstore, it sees that this result can be had only by the abandonment of the present unprofitable and fictitious trade system, and a return to one based on sound business principles, giving the public their books cheaper, and the dealer such fair advantages as he who devotes his capital, ability, and time to any business has a right to expect. It does not desire to stifle by combination the competition of enterprise and ability which is the life of trade, but seeks simply to unite the trade under a healthful md rational system of prices and discounts, which shall make it possible for able and use

ful men to remain in the trade, and supply to the younger generation some incentive to educate themselves rightly for a trade which should offer the double opportunity of a high order of usefulness to the community and fair pecuniary return. Looking, therefore, to the adoption of such a policy as shall secure the interests and prosperity of all, it respectfully offers to the publishers—who, being few in number, centralized in position, and in other respects the heads of the trade, are the proper parties to inaugurate the reform—the following suggestions:

1st. That the present system of professional discounts should be discountenanced and abolished by all book dealers, and no discounts from retail price be made to any persons outside the regular trade.

That the only exception, and that advisable as a matter of present expediency, should be in the first introduction and exchange of schoolbooks, which should be done through the resident trade or the publisher's traveling agent; the time for introduction prices being limited to thirty days.

That wholesaling live books to newspapers for premiums is especially detrimental to the trade.

2d. That the trade sales are a leading cause of the present demoralization, and detrimental to the interests of the whole trade, an evil which should be remedied by publishers declining to contribute, and by dealers generally abstaining from buying.

3d. That the publishers' practice of sending books by mail upon receipt of published price is an injustice to local dealers which can be fairly remedied by an additional charge of 10 per cent for postage.

4th. That to assure permanence in these reforms, the retail price of books should be reduced so that the largest discount under any circumstances could not exceed one third.

Whereas, We all recognize that underselling is the crying evil of the book trade, and that this evil is the result of the exorbitant retail prices of books, the large discounts made to the trade by publishers, and the book trade sales, and

Whereas, We have, by resolution, respectfully but earnestly requested publishers to lessen these prices and discounts and abolish trade sales; therefore

Resolved. That, as retailers, jobbers, and publishers, we pledge ourselves to use all reasonable endeavors to maintain and protect publishers' retail prices.

American Book Trade Association.

OFFICERS.

President:

A. D. F. Randolph, New-York.

First Vice-President:

Isaac C. Aston, Columbus.

Second Vice-President:

Martin Taylor, Buffalo.

Third Vice-President:

H. H. West, Milwaukee.

Treasurer:

Timothy Nicholson, Richmond, Ind.

Corresponding Secretary:

James S. Baker, New-York.

Recording Secretary:
John H. Thomas, Dayton.
Executive Committee:
William Lee, Bbston.
A. F. Payne, Davton.
W. D. Baker, St.' Louis.
E. L. Jansen, Chicago.
George H. Smith, Detroit.
\V. S. Appleton, New-York.
C. S. Bragg, Cincinnati.
A. Setliff, Nashville.
W. Jones, Burlington, Iowa.
T. A. Andrews, Cleveland.

Committee on Assemblies:
Isaac E. Sheldon, New-York.
Joseph Knight, Troy.

A. C. Barnes, New-York.
Henry Holt, New-York.
R. R. Bowker, New-York.

Arbitration Committee.
Robert Clarke, Cincinnati.
George Remsen, Philadelphia.
George B. Brown, Toledo.
S. A. Clarke, Pittsburg.
R. Crampton, Rock Island.

Finance Committee.
S. T. Bowen, Indianapolis.

B. H. Ticknor, Boston.

G. B. Grosvenor, Dubuque.
George E. Stevens, Cincinnati.
W. H. Gross, Hartford.

Constitution

OF THE AMERICAN BOOK TRADE ASSOCIATION.

1. The name of this organization shall be "The American Book Trade Association."

2. Its object shall be the promotion of the interests of the book trade in the United States, and the improvement of its methods of doing business.

3. Its officers shall be a President, three Vice-Presidents, a Treasurer, a Recording Secretary, and a Corresponding Secretary; to be elected at the annual meeting of the Association, by a majority of the members present. Their duties shall be the usual duties of such officers.

4. Its permanent committees shall be elected in the same manner and at the same time as the officers, and shall consist of—

An Executive Committee, of ten; A Committee on Assemblies of the Trade, of five;

A Committee of Arbitration, of five;
A Committee on Finance, of five.

5. The Treasurer shall give bonds to the President, in the sum of $1000, and shall pay out moneys only on the order of the Chairman of the Finance Committee.

6. The duties of the Executive Committee shall be the general oversight of the affairs of the Association, and to attend to all business not specially given to any other committees.

7. The Committee on Assemblies of the

Trade shall select the places and make all necessary preparations for holding the regular and other meetings of the Association, and shall notify all members of the same in due season, by their Secretary.

8. The Committee on Arbitration shall take cognizance of all complaints made against members, for alleged infractions of the by-laws. They shall endeavor, if possible, to reconcile the parties, and if not successful, shall publish, in the* official organ of the trade, a complete statement of the case, with their conclusions, and present the same to the Association at its next meeting.

9. The Committee on Finance shall devise ways and means for paying the necessary expenses of the Association ; shall be empowered to levy assessments in addition to the annual dues, if necessary, not to exceed $3 on each member in any one year, and shall audit the Treasurer's accounts

10. The officers and committees shall hold office for one year, or until their successors are elected.

11. The annual meeting of the Association shall be held commencing on the second Tuesday in July of each year ; and special meetings may be called by the President on the unanimous request of the Executive Committee.

12. Any publishing or bookselling firm, or author, may become a member by signing this Constitution, and paying annually the sum of two dollars.

13. The Executive Committee of this body shall have the power to fill all vacancies that may occur in committees, and each committee shall have authority to delegate its powers to one or more persons.

14. This Constitution may be amended at any meeting by a two-thirds vote.

Platform

OF THE CONVENTION AT PUT-IN BAY, O., JULY 21-23, I874.

Whereas, The retail booksellers of this country are a most important element of civilization, second only to the church and school-house, and no village or town can be thoroughly prosperous which does not contain at least one good bookstore where the best literature of this country and the world is attractively displayed ; and

Whereas, The late controversies and distractions existing in the book trade, and the custom which has grown up on the part of the publishers and larger city dealers of selling books to private consumers at very nearly the same rate at which the local bookseller can purchase them, has rendered it impossible for the local dealer to successfully invest his capital in a stock of books to meet and develop the wants of his own section; and if this evil is not checked, at no distant day the whole business of selling books must fall into the hands of large city dealers or peddlers, greatly to the detriment of local communities; therefore be it

Resolved, That the discounts which have heretofore been allowed to ministers, teachers, and libraries, on the ground that they are common wotkers with us in the distribution of knowledge, be as follows, namely: that a discount net exceeding 20 per cent on miscellaneous and school-books, and 10 per cent on medical books, may be allowed by publishers, jobbers, and retailers, to professional men

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