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The Niagara Convention

(Editorial Correspondence.)

Niagara Falls, July 14, 1875.

The Niagara Convention is so far a thorough success. The attendance is large, from all parts, and excellently representative. The tone is harmonious and moderate beyond what was generally expected, and the opinion has been expressed more than once that " the booksellers are a pretty sensible set of men." The meeting is well along in its business to-day, so that it will scarcely be necessary to remain in session longer than to-morrow, and the action so far taken is reasonable and wise.

President Randolph's opening address yesterday deeply impressed the Convention with the importance of its work, and with the honor and reponsibility of the calling of its members, and thus prepared the way for effective, because well-considered, work. That address, with other reports from the Convention, must of course go over to a Convention supplement next week, and I don't propose, in this brief letter, to do more than reflect the temper and achievement of the Convention. The reports from various representative men of different parts of the country were generally encouraging, and the statement, as a rule, was that the reform had already done real service, for the little trade they had lost was more than balanced by the results of the sounder system of doingbusiness which the Association was promoting. Mr. Barnes reported for New-York, in a classical and witty speech, full of " points," which was very telling. He alluded to the difficulties the Central Booksellers' Association had encountered in attempting the 20 percent agreement, and, although loudly called upon to mention names, refused to do so. He ended by stating that the house which had then stood in the way of reform, had within a few days joined the Association—an announcement which called forth the most hearty applause.

The Executive Committee had held a long session on Monday night, in consultation with other leading men of the trade then in town, and the results of this meeting were given in their report. These resolutions, by their suggestion, were referred to a general committee of thirty on the affairs of the trade, who were in session all last evening and much of this forenoon. The Convention, this morning, waiting their appearance, held what President Randolph calls " an experience meeting." Men from all parts of the country took the platform in turn, and recited their difficulties and their hopes, the President enlivening the proceedings with his ever-present and ever-popular humor, " original and selected."

At the two evening consultations, most of

the grievances were ventilated, and the way cleared for harmonious action. The Western retailers were, as had been expected, anxious for stringent measures, but they had cool, clear heads, and finally joined in less extreme measures, which all felt could arouse no feeling. The first resolution reported this morning, was to the effect that, after this first meeting, only members of the A. B. T. A. should be allowed to buy or sell at the Book Fair. This was carried unanimously and without debate. The second resolution was the pith of the Convention. It seemed to be tacitly agreed upon that the Convention should not attempt to change the essential features of the platform adopted at Put-in Bay, and its chief aim became that of putting this rule into effective operation. There was a great deal of discussion evoked by the Committee's resolution setting forth that the best booksellers of the country would be obliged to withdraw their capital from the book business unless a reform was effected, and therefore requesting the publishers to reduce discounts to all houses which should be reported by the Committee of Arbitration asundersellers. It was at last adopted with remarkable unanimity, and thus the main work of the Convention was finished.

Other provisions to-day have been a resolution limiting membership in the Book Fair, after the present one, to members of the A. B. T. A., providing for committees on local organizations, on the religious publication societies, on the Centennial, etc. The question of clearance sales provokes much discussion, and was under debate when the Convention adjourned. All told, the gathering has been remarkable, and it has made a great step forward in the reform, parti y by not trying to make that step too long a one. For eighteen months' work, since the first Cincinnati meeting, the book trade has something to be proud of. R. R. B.

We are by no means inclined to grumble against any fair competition, which is according to the proverb i' the life of trade," though we trust we may never need it to spur us up toward doing tliu best we are permitted to do for our read • ers and the trade. But we do think our friends of the American News Company are "rubbing it in" a little in following directly so many of our titles, just as we succeed, at much pains and cost, in making them of value. First our Monthly Book Circular was copied, both in title and style of get-up, just as we were beginning to make our own enterprise well known in the trade ; and the result was to confound the two publications, to our disadvantage, and to give the rival issue the benefit of our advertising. Now they attempt to take the wind out of our sails by announcing an "Educational Catalogue," with our exact title, after we have gone to considerable expense in having such a work thoroughly advertised through the trade. The titles are, of course, not distinctive enough to permit of copyright; but we should suppose that some other title and style might be chosen, if only from trade courtesy. We are perfectly willing to put our lists and publications in direct competition with any other, at any time; but we do object to mystifications which tend to confuse the trade as to which is which. Of course, two publications, where only one is needed, tend to divide support where there is not more than enough to make one what it should be ; but this is a matter which takes care of itself. All we wish for is fair play!

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.

To the Editor of the Publishers' Weekly:

Dear Sir: In your column of business changes of July 10th, you incorrectly state that the stationery branch of the late house of Noyes, Holmes & Co. has been sold to John B. Holmes & Co., whilst the fact is we merely made a clearance sale of a large portion of our stationery stock to the firm named, and at once laid in an entirely new and fresh line of stationery in all departments, to which the attention of dealers is invited. We continue the stationery business, jobbing and manufacturing, as formerly. Lockwood, Brooks & Co., Boston, Successors to Noyes, Holmes & Co.

BOOKS RECEIVED.

The Law Of Literature, by James Appleton Morgan, M.A. (James Cockcroft & Co.) Vol. I. There has been a dearth of legal literature on copyright, and now we are to have several at once. Mr. Curtis is revising his work, published in 1837, and Mr. Eaton S. Drone, who has contributed several valuable papers on the subject to the Law Review, is preparing an independent volume which will be issued by the same publishers. The work of Mr. Morgan, of which the first of the two volumes is before us, seems wider in its plan than either, for it deals comprehensively with the entire question of literary property in MSS., newspapers, plays, and works of art as well as books, the transfer of copyrights, and libel and contempt of court by literary matter. An appendix is to give the American, English, French, and German copyright laws. This first volume contains an introduction on the origin of intellectual property in natural law; Book I., " In what and in whom property in literary composition may exist," with chapters on innocence, libel, contempt of court, and originality; and of Book II., "Of property in literary composition before publication," the chapter on manuscripts. The second will of course be the copyright volume proper. We believe it is not quite the thing to say that a law-book is entertaining, yet Mr. Morgan's is certainly readable as well as excellent for consultation, and he has performed good service

in compiling it. His references are remarkably full, and some of the important trials, such as the "Griffith Gaunt" libel suit, he reprints in full from the digests. We take pleasure in commending this work to its public, and await with interest the publication of the concluding volume. Special mention should be made of the typographical beauty of the present volume. 8°, sheep, $7.50.

Nooks And Corners Of The New-england Coast, by Samuel Adams Drake. (Harper & Brothers.) In this is embraced descriptions, with many illustrations, of every place of past or present interest along the New-England coast, from Mount Desert Island to Saybrook. While the volume is pleasant and chatty, it is also scholarly, showing much patient labor and research, and an indefatigable energy in hunting up and recording facts, legends, and traditions. The memories of other days which cluster around and in all these " nooks and corners" are poetically and appropriately woven in with a mass of historical information, which renders the volume a most valuable contribution to historical literature. The illustrations are four hundred and forty-nine in number, including portraits and views, and are really very fine. Altogether the volume is very handsomely gotten up. 4to, cloth, $3.50.

The Green Gate, by Ernst Wichert. Translated from the German by Mrs. N. L. Wister. (J. B. Lippincott & Co.) Mrs. Wister's name on the title-page of a story may be taken as sufficient indorsement of its merits—her judgment in selecting stories for translation, thus far, having been proved sound and reliable. The present story, "The Green Gate," deals with German home-life in the rich mercantile classes, and presents many graphic delineations of character. There are so many romantic episodes in the story, the old legend of the "Green Gate" among them, that it would be impossible to do justice to any one of them in our space; we can only recommend the publication as one of the best out, in the line of summer reading. i2mo, cloth, $1.75.

On The Heights, by Berthold Auerbach. Translated by Simon Adler Stern. (Henry Holt & Co.) The many imperfections existing in the previous translation of this work induced the publishers to issue a new edition by a new translator. Mr. Stern's work will be found a great improvement upon his predecessor's, the translation being easy and flowing, and free from the crudities which in former editions marred the reader's pleasure. i2mo, cloth, %i.

Popular Resorts And How To Reach Them, by John B. Bachelder. (John B. Bachelder.) The third revised edition of one of the handsomest and most attractive guide-books for summer travel in the market. It will be found very agreeable reading for those who stay at home also, as the text is very clever and graphic, and the illustrations in which it abounds, unusually bold and well executed. i2mo, cloth, $2.

In The Kitchen. (Lee & Shepard.) Another cookery book! It is impossible for us to go into the respective merits of these publications, the only proof of the excellence of the pudding being in the eating. We can, however, designate difference of get up, as in this volume, where the type is unusually large, and printed on fine, clear, white paper, with plenty of margin. The size, too, has an advantage, being a The Niagara Convention (Editorial Correspondence.) NIAGARA FALLs, July 14, 1875. The Niagara Convention is so far a thorough success. The attendance is large, from all parts, and excellently representative. The tone is harmonious and moderate beyond what was generally expected, and the opinion has been expressed more than once that “the booksellers are a pretty sensible set of men.” The meeting is well along in its business to-day, so that it will scarcely be necessary to remain in session longer than to-morrow, and the action so far taken is reasonable and wise. President Randolph's opening address yesterday deeply impressed the Convention with the importance of its work, and with the honor and reponsibility of the calling of its members, and thus prepared the way for effective, because well-considered, work. That address, with other reports from the Convention, must of course go over to a Convention supplement next week, and I don't propose, in this brief letter, to do more than reflect the temper and achievement of the Convention. The reports from various representative men of different parts of the country were generally encouraging, and the statement, as a rule, was that the reform had already done real service, for the little trade they had lost was more than balanced by the results of the soundersystem of doing business which the Association was promoting. Mr. Barnes reported for New-York, in a classical and witty speech, full of “points,” which was very telling. He alluded to the difficulties the Central Booksellers' Association had encountered in attempting the 20 per cent agreement, and, although loudly called upon to mention names, refused to do so. He ended by stating that the house which had then stood in the way of reform, had within a few days joined the Association—an announcement which called forth the most hearty applause. The Executive Committee had held a long session on Monday night, in consultation with other leading men of the trade then in town, and the results of this meeting were given in their report. These resolutions, by their suggestion, were referred to a general committee of thirty on the affairs of the trade, who were in session all last evening and much of this forenoon. The Convention, this morning, waiting their appearance, held what President Randolph calls “an experience meeting." Men from all parts of the country took the platform in turn, and recited their difficulties and their hopes, the President enlivening the proceedings with his ever-present and ever-popular humor, “original and selected." 4t the two evening consultations, most of

the grievances were ventilated, and the way cleared for harmonious action. The Western retailers were, as had been expected, anxious for stringent measures, but they had cool, clear heads, and finally joined in less extreme measures, which all felt could arouse no feeling. The first resolution reported this morning, was to the effect that, after this first meeting, only members of the A. B. T. A. should be allowed to buy or sell at the Book Fair. This was carried unanimously and without debate. The second resolution was the pith of the Convention. It seemed to be tacitly agreed upon that the Convention should not attempt to change the essential features of the platform adopted at Put-in Bay, and its chief aim became that of putting this rule into effective operation. There was a great deal of discussion evoked by the Committee's resolution setting forth that the best booksellers of the country would be obliged to withdraw their capital from the book business unless a reform was effected, and therefore requesting the publishers to reduce discounts to all houses which should be reported by the Committee of Arbitration as undersellers. It was at last adopted with remarkable unanimity, and thus the main work of the Convention was finished. Other provisions to-day have been a resolution limiting membership in the Book Fair, after the present one, to members of the A. B. T. A., providing for committees on local organizations, on the religious publication societies, on the Centennial, etc. The question of clearance sales provokes much discussion, and was under debate when the Convention adjourned. All told, the gathering has been remarkable, and it has made a great step forward in the reform, partly by not trying to make that step too long a one. For eighteen months' work, since the first Cincinnati meeting, the book trade has something to be proud of. R. R. B.

We are by no means inclined to grumble against any fair competition, which is according to the proverb & the life of trade,” though we trust we may never need it to spur us up toward doing the best we are permitted to do sor our read. ers and the trade. But we do think our friends of the American News Company are “rubbing it in" a little in following directly so many of our titles, just as we succeed, at much pains and cost, in making them of value. First our Monthly Book Circular was copied, both in title and style of get-up, just as we were beginning to make our own enterprise well known in the trade; and the result was to confound the two publications, to our disadvantage, and to give the rival issue the benefit of our advertising. Now they attempt to takohe wind out of our sails by announcing an “Educational Catalogue,” with our exact title, after we have gone to considerable expense in having such a work thoroughly advertised through the trade. The titles are, of course, not distinctive enough to permit of copyright; but we should suppose that some other title and style might be chosen, if only from trade courtesy. We are perfectly willing to put our lists and publications in direct competition with any other, at any time; but we do object to mystifications which tend to confuse the trade as to which is which. Of course, two publications, where only one is needed, tend to divide support where there is not more than enough to make one what it should be ; but this is a matter which takes care of itself. All we wish for is fair play !

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.

Zoo the Editor of the Publishers' Weekly. DEAR SIR: In your column of business changes of July 1oth, you incorrectly state that the stationery branch of the late house of Noyes, Holmes & Co. has been sold to John B. Holmes & Co., whilst the fact is we merely made a clearance sale of a large portion of our stationery stock to the firm named, and at once laid in an entirely new and fresh line of stationery in all departments, to which the attention of dealers is invited. We continue the stationery business, jobbing and manufacturing, as formerly. Lockwood, BRooks & Co., Boston, Successors to Noyes, Holmes & Co.

BOOKS RECEIVED.

THE LAw of LITERATURE, by James Appleton Morgan, M.A. (James Cockcroft & Co.) Vol. I. There has been a dearth of legal litera. ture on copyright, and now we are to have several at once. Mr. Curtis is revising his work, published in 1837, and Mr. Eaton S. Drone, who has contributed several valuable papers on the subject to the Law &eriew, is preparing an independent volume which will be issued by the same publishers. The work of Mr. Morgan, of which the first of the two volumes is before us, seems wider in its plan than either, for it deals comprehensively with the entire question of literary property in MSS., newspapers, plays, and works of art as well as books, the transfer of copyrights, and libel and contempt of court by literary matter. An appendix is to give the American, English, French, and German copy. right laws. This first volume contains an introduction on the origin of intellectual property in natural law ; Book I., “In what and in whom property in literary composition may exist,” with chapters on innocence, libel, contempt of court, and originality; and of Book II., “Of property in literary composition before publication,” the chapter on manuscripts. The second will of course be the copyright volume proper. We believe it is not quite the thing to say that a law-book is entertaining, yet Mr. Morgan's is

in compiling it. His references are remarkably full, and some of the important trials, such as the “Griffith Gaunt" libel suit, he reprints in full from the digests. We take pleasure in commending this work to its public, and await with interest the publication of the concluding volume. Special mention should be made of the typographical beauty of the present volume. 8°, sheep, $7.5o. Nooks AND Corners of the New-ENGLAND Coast, by Samuel Adams Drake. (Harper & Brothers.) In this is embraced descriptions, with many illustrations, of every place of past or present interest along the New-England coast, from Mount Desert Island to Saybrook. While the volume is pleasant and chatty, it is also scholarly, showing much patient labor and research, and an indefatigable energy in hunting up and recording facts, legends, and traditions. The memories of other days which cluster around and in all these “nooks and corners” are poetically and appropriately woven in with a mass of historical information, which renders the volume a most valuable contribution to historical literature. The illustrations are four hundred and forty-nine in number, including portraits and views, and are really very fine. Altogether the volume is very handsomely gotten up. 4to, cloth, $3.50. THE GREEN GATE, by Ernst Wichert. Translated from the German by Mrs. N. L. Wister. (J. B. Lippincott & Co.) Mrs. Wister's name on the title-page of a story may be taken as sufficient indorsement of its merits—her judgment in selecting stories for translation, thus far, having been proved sound and reliable. The present story, “The Green Gate,” deals with German home-life in the rich mercantile classes, and presents many graphic delineations of character. There are so many romantic episodes in the story, the old legend of the “Green Gate” among them, that it would be impossible to do justice to any one of them in our space; we can only recommend the publication as one of the best out, in the line of summer reading. 12mo, cloth, $1.75. ON THE HEights, by Berthold Auerbach. Translated by Simon Adler Stern. (Henry Holt & Co.) The many imperfections existing in the previous translation of this work induced the publishers to issue a new edition by a new translator. Mr. Stern's work will be found a great improvement upon his predecessor's, the translation being easy and flowing, and free from the crudities which in former editions marred the reader's pleasure. 12mo, cloth, $2. PopULAR RESORTs AND How to REACH THEM, by John B. Bachelder. (John B. Bachelder.) The third revised edition of one of the handsomest and most attractive guide-books for summer travel in the market. It will be found very agreeable reading for those who stay at home also, as the text is very clever and graphic, and the illustrations in which it abounds, unusually bold and well executed. 12mo, cloth, $2. IN THE Kitchex. (Lee & Shepard.) Another cookery book . It is impossible for us to go into the respective merits of these publications, the only proof of the excellence of the pudding being in the eating. We can, however, designate difference of get up, as in this wow.we, where the type is unusua)\y \arge, aw", www.ve".

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quarto, and so well bound that the book seems made to set up on the kitchen-table, for it can be opened at any page and will remain so for consultation without a leaf falling. Every department is supplied with a number of blank pages, so that additional receipts maybe added. The receipts cover every kind of cooking, and are culled from Mrs. Miller's (the editress) own experience, and from French, German, and English works not in common use. Others have been taken from the written receipt-books of families. North and South, celebrated for the concoction of some special dish. We feel bound to again allude to the mechanical perfection of the volume, the entire workmanship being noticeable among present publications. 4to, cloth, $2.50.

Messrs. Robert Clarke & Co. have issued a "Catalogue of Theological and Religious Books," in which the works are entered alphabetically both by subject and author. It is in neat pamphlet form, octavo size, comprising some eighty pages, and includes a large collection of the best works, new and old, American and foreign, in this department of literature. Like all the biographical publications of this house, the catalogue is admirably compiled and arranged with exceptionally neat typography.

We have received from M. Gray, of San Francisco, the following music: "She Is So Innocent," from Lecocq's opera of La Fille de Madame Angot (35 c.); the "Japan Waltz," composed by S. H. Marsh (60 c.) ; " Kutschke Polka," by Ludwig Stasny (30 c.); " The Lute Song," the sixth number of the Schubert Album, revised and edited by Oscar Weil (35 c.); and "Smile whenever you Can," by L. von der Mehden (30 a).

Cobb, Andrews & Co.

Having long outgrown their old store in Superior street, Messrs. Cobb, Andrews & Co., whose firm existence dates nearly back to the chartering of Cleveland as a city, have lately moved to the large block they have built for their business on Euclid avenue. This new store forms one of the notably large bookstores of the country. The main floor is 180 feet deep, with a front of 52 and a height of 17 feet. The walls are shelved from ceiling to floor, and a light gallery is run from front to rear, obviating the necessity of using step-ladders. A wire-guarded bridge connects the gallery midway in the store, the ascent to which is by a pair of stairs leading to the middle of the bridge, and over the stairs to the basement. In front of the stairs, the office is placed, and between this and the front are arranged handsome tables and show-cases. The store is largely stocked with school and miscellaneous books, stationery, photographs, etc., the basement being chiefly devoted to storing the stationery stock.

When Mr. C. C. Cobb first entered, as a boy, the business of which he is now one of the proprietors, he was the only clerk, and had to sweep out the store, build the fire, and run erra»ds, and do all the odd jobs, besides waiting on the customers. The crowds on the opening evening were received by a small army of clerks, salesmen, book-keepers, and traveling agents, whose services are required

by the extensive business of the establishment It is but justice to say that the fine display on the other evening was due, in no small degree, to the taste and industry of those employees, and that they have so far shown themselves to be walking in the course of faithful attention to business and uniform courtesy to the public which has brought prosperity and honor to their employers.

In removing to their new and elegant quarters, Messrs. Cobb, Andrews & Co. have not wholly abandoned their old store. They will continue that as a down-town retail book and stationery store, and have made several improvements in the internal arrangements, which customers will discover for themselves, without any formal " opening."

Stationery at the Book Fair.

Much to the surprise of the entire trade, the stationers have signified their intention to take a great interest in the coming Book Fair. Most of the leading houses in the city will be represented, and there will be a display of stationery that will surpass any thing of the kind ever attempted before. The variety of goods offered far exceeds the former contributions to the Trade Sale, and if the Fair should turn out successfully, it is urged that the contributions to the next will be greater than the present.

Among the New-York houses represented will be Chamberlin, Whitmore & Co., who will exhibit wedding, fine, and staple envelopes, and foreign papers of all kinds. Samuel Raynor & Co., J. Q. Preble & Co., and Berlin & Jones will also exhibit envelopes and papers. Liebenroth, Von Auw& Co. will display a full line of blank-books, memorandum and pass-books; Carter, Dinsmore & Co., inks, mucilage, etc., etc. ; Charles D. Pratt, fancy goods and bronzes; Edward E, Brown, fine envelopes; Henry Levy & Co., pocket-books, etc.; Porter & Bainbridge, full line of Centennial letter and note-paper. The American Lead-Pencil Company and the Eagle Pencil Company will make a display of their best goods. The Manhattan Book Company will show a full line of their perforated manuscript, sermon, and legal papers. Messrs. Anderson & Cameron will display all their specialties, in the way of school-cards, blank notes, drafts, etc., etc. ; Robert Sneider. a fine assortment of fancy and plain stationery ; L. Dubernet, passe-partouts, etc.; R. B. Dovell's Son, inks, mucilage, etc., etc. ; Robert Burnett, new sample-book, etc. ; Baker, Pratt & Co., imported stationery, inks, drawing-papers, Bristolboards, etc.; E. Steiger will make a handsome display of globes, etc., and E. & H. T. Anthony will show a line of stereoscopic goods, etc.

L. Prang & Co., of Boston, offer their whole catalogue of chromos, cards, etc.

From Philadelphia, there will be S. D. Burlock & Co., W. W. Harding, and A. J. Holmon & Co., all of whom will display albums.

H. B. Nims & Co., Troy, will show globes and pamphlet-cases. CharlesTaber & Co., NewBedford, photographic copies of fine engravings, stereoscopic views, etc. Martin Taylor, Buffalo, self-fitting and self-fastening book-covers. The United States Soapstone Manufacturing Company, of Cincinnati, O., exhibit a full line of soapstone pencils. From Springfield, Mass., there is the Powers Paper Company—

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