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F. B. Patterson, New-York.

Baker, Point-Lace and Diamonds, new ed.%1.00

T. B. Peterson & Bros., Phila.

Crockett, Life and Adventures.......Pap. 50

Wood, Parkwater Pap. 75

Pott, Young & Co., New-York.

Engelbach, Two Campaigns 1.50

A. D. F. Randolph & Co., New-York. Porter, The Years that are Told r.25

Ref. Church Board Of Pub., New-York. Hartley, Prayer and Modern Thought.... 1.25

Roberts Bros.. Boston.

Coolidge, Nine Little Goslings 1.50

Miller, Ship in the Desert 1.50

Thome, Jolly Good Times 1.50

K. Tompkins, New-York.

Selected Poems :—Aytoun's Execution of Montrose, etc. ;—Burns' Death and Dr. Hornbook, etc Ea., pap. 10

Van Benthuysen Printing House, Albany.

Moriariy, Wayside Pencillings 75

D. Van Nostrand, New-York.

Rice and Johnson, New Method of Obtaining the Differentials of Functions.

Pap. 50 Thurston, The Mechanical Engineer. Pap. 50

John Wiley & Son, New-York.

Svedelius, Handbook for Charcoal Burners $i-50

Warren, Problems in Stone-Cutting 2.50

ANNOUNCEMENTS OF FORTHCOMING PUBLICATIONS.

RE SOL VED, That this Convention recognize the Publishers' Weekly as the established organ of the entire trade, and recommend it to publishers as the medium through which they should make their "first announcement" of books they propose to publish, ami the full title of all book! immediately on publication.American Book Trade Association.

J. W. BOUTON, New-York.

The Symbolical Language of Ancient Art and Mythology. By Richard Payne Knight. Edited by Alexander Wilder, M.D.

Ancient Faiths Embodied in Ancient Names. By Dr. Thomas lnman. Vol. 3.

The Apocalypsia. By Godfrey Higgins. New cd. Vol. 1.

The Story of the Stick in all Ages and all Lands. From the French of Fernand Michel.

G. W. CARLETON & 00., New-York. The Adventures of Mr. Verdant Green. New ed.

WILLIAM T. GILL & CO., Boston.
(November.)

Laurel Leaves of Poems, Stories, etc. By H. W.

Longfellow, Holmes, etc. 40. $6. LotOS Leaves. By Alfred Tennyson, John Hay, Mark

Twain, etc. Iliustr. by Fredericks, Lumley, and La

Farge. 40. $6; Tky. mor., $12.

The Horn of Plenty, of Home Poems and Pictures.

By Jean Ingelow, Miss Mulock, George McDonald, Dora

Greenwell, and others. iliustr. Sin. 40. $2.25. Many Treasures of Poetry, Romance, and Art. Sm.

4°. $2.50. The Dickens-Collins Christmas Stories. Iliustr.

$1.50. Sermons to the Clergy. By Gail Hamilton. 120.

$1.50. Drifted Asunder; or, The Tide of Fate. By Amanda

M. Douglass, author of " In Trust," " Seven Daughters,"

etc. 120. $1.50.

The Treasure Trove Series. Vol. 3. Story ; Vol. 4, Extravaganza; Vol. 5, Es*ay. Sq. 160. Per vol., $1.

HARPER & BROS., New-York.

Life of Lord Byron. By Senor Castelar.

The Thrones and Palaces of Babylon'and Nineveh, from the Persian Gulf to the Mediterranean Sea. A Thousand Miles on Horseback. By Rev. J. T. Newman.

INGHAM, CLARKE & 00., Cleveland, Ohio.

Tappan's Ohio Heports. Cases decided in the Courts of Common Pleas in the Fifth Circuit of the State of Ohio, commencing with the May Term, 1816. To which is added the Opinion of Judge McLean in the Case of Lauderback r-s. Moore. By Benjamin Tappan, President Judge of said Courts. 8", pp. 356. Shp., «<■/, §3.50.

J. B. LIPPINCOTT & 00., PhUadelphia.

Agnew's Surgery. The Principles and Practice of Surgery. By D. Hayes Agnew, M.D. Iliustr.

Prose Miscellanies of Heinrich Heine. Transl. by S. L. Fleishman. 12°.

"Wild Hyacinth. A Novel. By Mrs. Randolph, author of " Gentianella," etc.

The Kiss: In History, Fiction. Poetry, and Anecdote. By C. C. Bombaugh, author of '* Gleanings for the Curious," etc.

Chemistry. Theoretical, Practical, and Analytical; as applied to the Arts and Manufactures. Iliustr.

Brachet's French Grammar. Adapted for the Use of English Schools. By P. H. E. Brette and Gustave Masson. 120.

Life of Edwin Forrest. Authorized by the Executors. By Rev. William R. Alger. Iliustr. 8°.

American Boyhood. A Poem. By Horace P. Biddle.

12°.

Florida. Its Poetry and its Prose. Being an Account of the /Estheticf, the Physics, and the History of the State of Florida, for General Readers. Together with a Complete Guide and Handbook for Invalids, Tourists, and Settlers. By Sidney Lanier. Iliustr.

Being and Seeming. A Romance. From the German of Ernst Wichert, author of " The Green Gate," etc.

THOMPSON, BROWN & CO.

The American Union Speaker. By John D. Phill^brick, LL.D. New ed., rev. Cr. 8°, pp. 600. $2. (Nov.)

D. VAN1N08TRAND, New-York.

Bridge and Tunnel Centres. By John B. McMasler.

Graphical Statics. By Prof. A. J. Du Bois. WALLINGFORD PRINTING 00., WaMngford, Ot.

Foot-Notes; or. Walking as a Fine Art. By Alfred Barron, "Q. i6°. pp. 330. $1.50.

H. T. WILLIAMS, New-York.

Household Elegancies. By Henry T. Williams and Mrs. C. S. Jones. Pp. 300. $1 50. (Nov. 15.)

WILSTACH, BALDWIN & CO., Cincinnati.

Sherman's Historical Raid. The Memoirs in the Light of the Record, Lased upon Compilations made from the Files of lite War-Office. By Gen. H. V. Boynton, Washington Correspondent of the Cincinnati Gazette. Sm. 3°. $2. (Oct. 20.)

ALPHABETICAL LIST OF BOOKS JUST PUBLISHED.

The Prices in this List are /or cloth Uttered, unless otherwise indicated. Imported books are marked tuitk an asterisk; Authors' and Subscription Books, or Bo>ks published at net prices, with two asterisks.

Baker.—Point-Lace and Diamonds. Poems. By George A. Baker, jr. With illustr. by Addie Ledyard. New ed. 18®, pp. 153. $1 Patterson.

Bauduy.—Lectures on Diseases of the Nervous System. By Jerome K. Bauduy, M.D. 8°. $4 Lippincott.

Boisgobey.—The Golden Tress. Transl. from the French 01 Fortune Boisgobey. 120. $1.50.

Claxton, R. &* H.

Butterworth.—The Story of the Hymns; or. Hymns that have a History. An Account of the Origin of Hymns of personal religious Experience. By Hezekiah Butterworth. With Portraits. 120, pp. 256. $2.

A in. Tract Soc.

Coolidge.—Nine Little Goslings. By Susan Coolidge. Ten illustr. by J. A. Mitchell. Sq. 160. $1.50..Roberts.

Crockett.—The Life and Adventures of Davy Crockett. An Autobiography. Illustr. 8°, pp. 185. Pap., 50 c.

Peterson.

Delisser.—Horseman's Guide. By George P. Delisser, V.S. 160. $1; bds., 75 c Dickdr F.

Diokens.—The Works of Charles Dickens. Illustr. Gads hill ed. In 15 vols. Vol. 5. Our Mutual Friend. Cr. 8°. $2 Osgood.

•Engelbach.—Two Campaigns. A Tale of Old Alsace. By A. H. Engelbach, author of " Lionel's Revenge," etc. Illustr. 160, pp. 252. $1.50 Pott, Y. & Co.

Fenner.—Vision: Its Optical Defects, and the Adaptation of Spectacles. With 74 illustr. on wood, and Selections from the Text. Types of Jaeger and Snellen. By C. S. Fenner, M.D. 8°, pp. 299. -$3.50. ..Lindsay &* B.

Goethe's Faust. Translated by Bayard Taylor. Kennett ed. 2 vols. 160, pp. 378, 478. $5 Osgood.

Gray.—Ada and Gerty. A Story of School Life. By Louisa M. Gray. Illustr. 160, pp. 336. $1.25.

A m. Tract Soc.

Hanover.—A Practical Treatise on the Law of Horses. Embiacing the Law of Bargain, Sale, and Warranty of Horses and other Live Stock; the Rule as to Unsoundness and Vice, and the Responsibility of the Proprietors of Livery, Auction, and Sale Stables. Innkeepers. Veterinary Surgeons. Farriers, Carriers, and the Law of Neelifence in the Use of Horses, including the Rule of the Load, and the Responsibility of Owners for Injuries caused by vicious and unruly Animals. By M. D. Hanover, of the Cincinnati Bar. Second ed., enl. 8°, pp. lit, 411. Shp., $4 Clarke.

Harte.—Tales of the Argonauts, and other Sketches. By Bret Harte. 160, pp. 283. $1.50 Osgood.

Hartley.—Prayer and its Relation to Modern Thought and Criticism. By Isaac S. Hartley, D.D. 120, pp. 257. $1.25 - Re/. Ch. Bd. 0/Pub.

Holmes.—Very Little Dialogues for Very Little Folks. By Alice Holmes. 160. Bds., 50 c. ; pap., 30 c.

Dick cV F.

Holmes.—Autocrat of the Breakfast Table. By O. W. Holmes. Saunterer" s ed. 24*. $1.50 Osgood.

Keller.—The Amazon and Madeira Rivers. Sketches and Descriptions from the Note-Book of an Explorer. By Franz Keller, Engineer. Illustr. 40. $5 Lippincott.

Mathews.—Elsie's Santa Claus. By Joanna H. Mathews, author of " The Bessie Books,* etc. Illustr. 160, pp. 346. $1.25 Carter.

Miller.—The Ship in the Desert. A Poem. By Joaquin Miller. 160. $1.50 Roberts.

Moriarty.—Wayside Pencillings, with Glimpses of Sacred Shrines. By Rev. J. J. Moriarty. 180. 75 C.

Van Benthuysen.

*PlatO.—The Dialogues of Plato. Transl. into English with Analyses and Introductions. By B. Jowett, M.A. Second ed., rev. and corr., with Additions ; and an Index of Subjects and Proper Names. 5 vols. 8°. Per v., $6 Macmilia n.

Porter.—The Years that are Told. By Rose Porter, author of " Summer Driftwood for the Winter Fire," etc 160, pp. 233. $1.25 Randolph.

Beade.—Charles Reade's Novels. Illustr. Library ed. In 6 vols. Vol. 5. Peg Wornngton; A Simpleton. 120.

$1.50 Osgood.

Bice and Johnson.—On a new Method of Obtaining the Differentials of Functions. With especial Reference to the Newtonian Conception of Rates or Velocities. By J. Minot Rice and W. Woolsey Johnson. New ed.. re?: 120. Pap..50C Van Xostrand.

Scott.—The Waverley Novels. By Sir Walter Scott. Illustr. Melrose ed. In 13 vols. Vol. 5. Quentin Durward; Anne of Geierstein. Cr. 8°. $2., Osgood.

Selected Poems :—The Execution of Montrose, by W. E. Aytoun ; The Drummer Boy's Bii'ial ;—Death and Dr. Hornbook, by Robert Burns ; To a Mouse, by Robert Burns; Willie Brew'd a Peck o' Ma'ut, by Robert Burns; As I was a-Wandering, by Robert Burns. Sq. 160. Ea., pap., 10 c Tompkins.

•♦Smithsonian Report.—Annual Report of the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian Institution ; showing the Operations, Expenditures, and Conditions of the Institution for the Year 1874. 8°, pp. 416.

[Gov. Printing Office.]

Svedelius.—Handbook for Charcoal Burners. By G. Svedelius. Transl. from the Swedish by R. B. Anderson, A.M. Ed., with Notes, by W. J. L. Nicodemus, A.M., C.E. 128, pp. xv, 217. Si.50 Wiley.

Thackeray.—Works. By W. M. Thackeray. Illustr. Library ed. Miscellanies: B irry Lyndon and Burlesques;— Irish and Paris Sketch-Books ;—Book of Snob-., Dennis Duval ;—The Four Georges, English Humurists ;—Catherine, Christmas Books. 5 v. 12°. Per vol., %2. .Osgood.

Thome.—Jolly Good Times ; or, Child-Life on a Farm. By P. Thome. Illustr. by Addie Ledyard. Sq. 16*. $1.50 Roberts.

Thurston.—The Mechanical Engineer, his Preparation and his Work. An Address to the Graduating CUss of the Stevens Institute of Technology. By Prof. R. H. Thurston, A.M., C.E. 8°, Pap., 50c.../ an Xostrand.

Warren.—Stereotomy. Problems in Stone-Cutting. By S. Edward Warren, C.E. 8°, pp. xi, 126. $3.50.. Wiley.

Wood.—Parkwater ; or. Told in the Twilight. By Mrs. Henry Wood. 8°, pp. 210. Pap., 75 c Peterson.

ORDER

American Tract Soc. New-York.

Butterworth, Story of the Hymns. $2.00

Gray, Ada and Gerty 1.25

Rohert Carter & Bros., New-York. Mathews, Elsie's Santa Claus 1.25

Rohert Clarke & Co., Cincinnati.

Hanover, Treatise on Law of Horses.Shp. 4.00

Claxton, Remsen & Haffelkinger, Phila.

Boisgobey, Golden Tress 1.50

Dick & Fitzgerald, New-York.

Delisser, Horseman's Guide Bds. 75

Holmes, Very Little Dialogues.

Bds., 50 c. ; pap. 30

Lindsay & Bi.akiston, Phila. Fenner, Vision 3.50

LIST.

J. B. Lippincott & Co., Phila.

Bauduy, Diseases of the Nervous System.$4.00 Keller, Amazon and Madeira Rivers . 5.00

Macmii.lan & Co., New-York.

Plato, Dialogues, Jowett's Transl., new ed., 5 v., per vol 6.00

Jas. R. Osgood & Co.. Boston.

Dickens, Works, ///. Gadshilled., v. 5 200

Goethe's Faust, Taylor's Transl., 2 v 5.00

Harte, Tales of the Argonauts 1.50

Holmes, Autocrat of the Breakfast Table.

Saunterer $ ed 1.50

Reade, Novels, ///. Lib. ed., v. 5 1.30

Scott, Waverley Novels, ///. Me/tvseed.,v. 5. 2.00 Thackeray, Miscellanies, ///. Lib. ed., 5 v.,

per vol 2.00 F. B. Patterson, New-York.

Baker, Point-Lace and Diamonds, new cd.% 1.00

T. B. Peterson & Bros., Phila.

Crockett, Life and Adventures Pap. 50

Wood, Parkwater Pap. 75

Pott, Young & Co., New-York.

Engelbach, Two Campaigns 1.50

A. D. F. Randolph & Co., New-York. Porter, The Years that are Told 1.25

Ref. Church Board Of Pub., New-York. Hartley, Prayer and Modern Thought.... 1.25

Roberts Bros., Boston.

Coolidge, Nine Little Goslings 1.50

Miller, Ship in the Desert 1.50

Thorne, Jolly Good Times 1.50

K. Tompkins, New-York.

Selected Poems :—Aytoun's Execution of Montrose, etc. ;—Burns' Death and Dr. Hornbook, etc Ea., pap. 10

Van Benthuysen Printing House, Albany.

Moriany, Wayside Pencillings 75

D. Van Nostrand, New-York.

Rice and Johnson, New Method of Obtaining the Differentials of Functions.

Pap. 50 Thurston, The Mechanical Engineer.Pap. 50

John Wiley & Son, New-York.

Svedelius, Handbook for Charcoal Burners $1.50

Warren, Problems in Stone-Cutting 2.50

ANNOUNCEMENTS OF FORTHCOMING PUBLICATIONS.

RE SOL VED, That this Convention recognize the Publishers' Weekly as the established organ of the entire trade, and recommend it to publishers as the medium through which they should make their "first announcement" of books they propose to publish, ami the full title of all books immediately on publication.American Book Trade Association.

J, W.BOUTON, New-York,

The Symbolical Language of Ancient Art and Mythology. By Richard Payne Knight. Edited by Alexander W.lder, M.D.

Ancient Faiths Embodied in Ancient Names. By Dr. Thomas Inman. Vol. 3.

The Apocalypsis. By Godfrey Higgins. New ed. Vol. 1.

The Story of the Stick in all Ages and all Lands. From the French of Fernand Michel.

0. W. OARLETON & 00., New-York. The Adventures of Mr. Verdant Green. New ed.

WILLIAM F. GILL & CO., Boston,

(JVirvemSer.)

Laurel Leaves of Poems, Stories, etc. By H, W. Longfellow, Holmes, etc. 40. $6.

Lotos Leaves. By Alfred Tennyson, John Hay, Mark Twain, etc. Iliusir. by Fredericks, Lumley, and La Farge. 40. $6; Tky. mor., $12.

The Horn of Plenty, of Home Poems and Pictures. By Jean lngelow, Miss Mulock, George McDonald, Dora Greenwell, and others, lllustr. Sm. 40. $3.25.

Many Treasures of Poetry, Romance, and Art. Sm.

The Dickens-Collins Christmas Stories. lllustr.

$1.50. Sermons to the Clergy. By Gail Hamilton. 120.

Si-50. Drifted Asunder; or, The Tide of Fate. By Amanda

M. Douglass, author of " In Trust," " Seven Daughters,M

etc. 120. $1.50. The Treasure Trove Series. Vol. 3. Story ; Vol. 4,

Extravaganza; Vol. 5, Essay. Sq. 160. Per vol., $1.

HARPER & BROS., New-York.

Life of Lord Byron. By Sefior Castelar.

The Thrones and Palaces of Babylon'and Nineveh, from the Persian Gulf to the Mediterranean Sea. A Thousand Milts on Horseback. By Rev. J. T, Newman.

INGHAM, CLARKE & 00., Cleveland, Ohio.

Tappan's Ohio Reports. Cases decided in the Courts of Common Pleas in the Fifth Circuit of the State of Ohio, commenting with the May Term, 1816. To which is added the Opinion of ludye McLean in the Case of Laudcrback vs. Moore. By Benjamin Tappan, President Judge of said Courts. 8~, pp. 356. Shp., net, Jo-sq

J. B. LIPPINC0TT & 00., Philadelphia.

f

Agnew's Surgery, The Principles and Practice of Surgery. By D. Hayes Agnew, M.D. lllustr.

Prose Miscellanies of Heinrich Heine. Transl. by S. L. Fleishman. 120.

"Wild Hyacinth. A Novel. By Mrs. Randolph, author of " Gentianella," etc.

The Kiss: In History, Fiction. Poetry, and Anecdote. By C. C. Bombaugh, author of "Gleanings for the Curious," etc.

Chemistry. Theoretical, Practical, and Analytical; as applied to the Arts and Manufactures. lllustr.

Brachet's French Grammar. Adapted for the Use of English Schools. By P. H. E. Brette and Gustave Masson. i2&.

Life Of Edwin Forrest. Authorized by the Executors. By Rev. William R. Alger. lllustr. 8°.

American Boyhood. A Poem. By Horace P. Biddle.

12°.

Florida. Its Poetry and its Prose. Being an Account of the /Esthetic*, the Physics, and the History of the State of Florida, for General Readers. Together with a Complete Guide and Handbook for Invalids, Tourists, and Settlers. By Sidney Lanier. lllustr.

Being and Seeming. A Romance. From the German of Ernst Wichert, author of *" The Green Gate,** etc.

THOMPSON, BROWN & CO.

The American Union Speaker. By John D. PhilI t^brick, LL.D. New ed., rev. Cr. 8°, pp. 600. $a. {Nov.)

D. VAN.N08TRAND, New-York.

Bridge and Tunnel Centres. By John B. Mc

Master.
Graphical Statics. By Prof. A. J. Du Bois.

WALLINQF0ED PRINTING 00., Wallingford, Ot.

Foot-Notes ; or. Walking as a Fine Art. By Alfred Barron, "Q." i6°, pp. 330. $1.50.

H. T. WILLIAMS, New-York.

Household Elegancies. By Henry T. Williams and Mrs. C. S. Jones. Pp. 300. $1 50. (Nov. 15.)

WIL8TACH, BALDWIN & CO., Cincinnati.

Sherman's Historical Raid. The Memoirs in the Light of the Record, based upon Compilations made from the Files of the War-Office. By Gen. H. V. Boynton, Washington Correspondent of the Cincinnati Gazette. Sm. 8°. $2. {Oct, 20.)

The Question at Princeton.

A Letter, printed elsewhere, from the Princeton student whose name has become familiar to the trade in connection with Mr. McGinnis' "missionary efforts," brings up at once the question of the proper relations in the trade of the class of people he represents. Let us add that the gentleman in question called personally at this office and made a very open and manly statement of his position. He certainly represents the " college bookstore" at its best, and the case is therefore one in which the general issue may be most fairly discussed. We regret that any information which we have printed may have unintentionally misrepresented him.

As the case stands, this gentleman is willing to abide by the rules of the A. B. T. A., and is now selling at no better than ten off, at which rate, he claims, the regular dealer referred to offers books to the students. He is ready to cease this* He keeps a stock of such books as are commonly use^l in the college, and of stationery, and since for this purpose he pays for a whole room instead of " chumming it," the element of rent enters somewhat into the problem. He depends on his sales of books to pay his expenses while in college, and in this sense "makes his living" by bookselling. He has sold [books for a year or more, but leaves college and the business next year.

The reform movement, as we have many times said, was never intended, nor has it been construed by its responsible authorities, to give color to any combination which should keep one man out to keep another in. This would be neither right nor wise, it it were possible. The life of trade is competition; the reform simply says that this competition shall be legitimate, and not the cut-throat system of running down publishers' prices, which must ruin a business necessarily based upon some such scale. But it does set forth as necessary to the development of the entire book interest, which is peculiar and distinctive in its commercial conditions, that the class which invests capital to represent the publishers' stock, and brings the experience and continuous vigor of professional work to their service, must have the margin to cover all this. This margin is no margin if given to others as well. The publishers look to the regular dealer to increase their sales by establishing a permanent depot of supplies, by keeping in stock not only the books of the day and those immediately required by his community, but their full lines of publication, and by studying and cultivating his business as his profession. The general trade already fails to meet some

of these requirements, and it was to bring it into a healthful condition again that the A. B. T. A. was formed.

On the other hand, it is not possible to insist on all these as the business qualifications to obtain the trade discount. A new-comer in the trade, or one who carries a special stock, is equally recognized as entitled to it. The practical question is where to draw the line, or whether any line is to be drawn in this direction. If the regular dealer in a college town is assured that he shall not be undersold, thai certainly ought to be sufficient for him to hold his own, and there is no cause for complaint in this direction. We are by no means sure that anybody who in any way makes a business of selling books, and is desirous to join and willing to abide by the rules of the A. B. T. A., can rightly be refused admission.

Any merchant, publisher, or otherwise, who understands his business, and is not so feverish for sales that he violates his judgment, will of course discriminate between different classes of his customers. One who keeps full lines of his goods, is a vigorous distributor for him. is of tried credit, and is permanently in the business, is certainly entitled in the nature of things to better terms than an amateur tradesman, who runs no risks to speak of for him, who does not promote business to any extent, and who is but a temporary customer after all. It is part of the demoralization of the trade that, in the anxiety to make or to hold customers against rival houses, this business principle has been so generally forgotten. Here is a definite advantage that the regular dealer in a university town, or anywhere, should have over the "college bookstore," variety store, or other quasi "members of the trade." Our college friend is certainly entitled to the advantages of a " large buyer," and providing he does not undersell or promote underselling, there is nothing to prevent his retailing what he buys. Whether the publishers would see fit to give him, even were he acknowledged a member of the trade, any belter discount, is yet to be seen. Certainly, twenty per cent would be not far from the same to him that a third off is to the regular dealer, with his risk. But whether he is actually to be received as a member of the trade, we must leave to the authority of the trade itself, through its meetings or the Arbitration Committee.

The New-England Booksellers' Association has taken a long step forward in a resolution given elsewhere. We trust the trade will see its force practically. Another lottery case is reported from Providence, the offending parties being, it is said, members of the A. B. T. A.

As to Mr. Henry C. Lea's letter elsewhere, it should be stated that the letter of the two Cleveland firms was sent to us some time before it appeared in print, possibly before the answer was received. Our statement of his position was drawn from his own personal utterances, as we understood them. All that is required of Mr. Lea is that he should request jobbers not to sell his publications to undersellers. Some of the jobbers claim that they have no moral right to do this, except on the direct authority of the publisher. This involves no "detective" work, and we do not understand why Mr. Lea, on his own showing, should hesitate to take the step. The Arbitration Committee has so far settled individual cases amicably and very satisfactorily, but it needs as a basis such a request as is asked from Mr. Lea.

Our apologies for the delay of the Uniform Trade List Annual have been so many, that we are as tired of them as our readers; but we must again shed complaints off our heads upon the dilatory publishers. The first difficulty was in obtaining the catalogues to index, and the next in obtaining them to bind. Twenty are even yet not in, though our Index is mostly in type. We are hoping now to issue the work shortly after the first of November, or at any rate, before 1881.

The trade will learn with pleasure that the business of the New-York house of Lee, Shepard & Dillingham is now resumed, Mr. Charles T. Dillingham having bought it out under his own name ; and with regret that the Boston house has been compelled to take proceedings in bankruptcy. We trust the future will have brighter days in store for the wellliked gentlemen who compose the Boston house.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.

The interests of the trade can not be better served, than by a full discussion by its members of all questions which affect it. Out columns are always open to communications on any such subject,provided they be brief and suggestive, and we cordially invite the trade to express any suggestions or opinions of interest or value in "Letters to the Editor."

The Question at Princeton.

To the Editor of the Publishers' Weekly:

Dear Sir: In your issue of October 2d, my attention was called to your statement respecting the condition of the book trade in Princeton.

It seems hardly possible that Mr. McGinnis could have been prompted by malice aforethought to circulate the statements which your article contains. However this may be, it is impossible to harmonize them with the facts in the case. The first statement that I take exception to is this, namely: "The gentleman in question .... went about among the classes, as soon as a new book was announced for college use, and collected cash for copies at, say, a third off." My exception is based upon the fact that, during my entire residence in Princeton, and my connection with this business, I have never received money for any book before the purchaser had obtained the same. Further, I have never sold any book— one sale excepted, made during the fall of 1874, and then at twenty and five off—for less than twenty off.

The other objectionable statement is: " Now, we don't believe in any definition of a bookseller that shall keep one man out and another in—a sort of 'ring;' but we do believe that a tried, sound member of the trade, who keeps a store and stock, ought to have a trade discount, and 'contrariwise not.'" The evident inference from this statement is, that Mr. McGinnis, the "Princeton missionary," is a bookseller, and that I, the student, am not.

While at the same time I know that it is impossible for any one to deny that a "bookseller" is one who sells books, yet I am willing to accept the popular definition—your own by the way—as one who keeps a store and stock, and by it show that I am legitimately employed. Robbed of all its concrete conditions, the abstract idea of a bookseller, then, comes to be: he who, on account of his business, is compelled to bear additional expense. This expense may be incurred by rent of store, carrying of stock, etc. It is hardly possible for any one to say how much stock determines the bookseller, any more than it is possible for any one to state what branch of the trade a man should enter. It may suit one to sell religious, another educational books, while a third finds it to his advantage, in connection with his stock of books, to keep stationery, wall-paper, frames, looking glasses, bats and balls, and even " soap and candles" if they would pay. Since these things are so, and since I am under the necessity of incurring double the expense I otherwise should on account of my business, and since I do keep a stock suited to my business necessities, I fail to see the line which divides my business from that of Mr. McGinnis. It seems to me a question of degree and not of kind.

Another point. Your article says: "Meanwhile Mr. McGinnis, as the leading bookseller of the place, was expected by the college authorities and the students .... to lay in a stock of these books." This seems to imply that the above-named parties looked to Mr. McGinnis to furnish all the books required. Now, inasmuch as I carried on this business during the past year, and by the expectations of my fellow-students, and the kindness of the college authorities, I was led to expect that I should furnish some of the required books, and my hopes were well founded.

Permit me, in closing, to say that no one desires a healthy trade more than myself, and that I am perfectly willing to assent to all reasonable and businesslike conditions; but until Mr. McGinnis consents to abide by the known

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