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mage. (Harper & Bros.) The fourth series of Mr. Talmage's sermons. Although the title of the work is the least sensational of any yet published, the sermons individually make up for anj' apparent lack of eccentricity. They are both in substance and name altogether out of the trodden paths of theology, and savor almost too much of out-door preaching to be the pleasantest reading to a cultivated mind. We have no doubt, however, of the good they have achieved and will achieve, and can therefore commend them to Mr. Talmage's many admirers as being fully up to his usual style of oratory. We offer a few specimen titles, taken at random from the contents: "Snow-water and Alkali Insufficient," "The Religion of Ghosts," " Stripping the Slain," "The Crimson Coat," " The Red Cord in the Window," " Pillows Under the Arms," "The Superhuman Jesus," etc., etc. i2mo, cloth, $2.

Sunshine For Rainy Days. (American Tract Soc.) This is an edition in German of one of the prettiest juveniles the Tract Society publishes. Out of ninety-four pages, forty-seven are full-page pictures, with an opposite page of reading matter (in German, of course). The pictures are copies of very familiar and favorite studies, and just the kind to win a child's heart. We noticed the same book last year, in its English dress, as one of the cheapest and most attractive juveniles in the market. 4to, cloth, $1.

Proud Little Dody, by Sarah E. Chester. (American Tract Soc.) A pretty story of a quaint, sunny little girl whose besetting sin is pride. Her plays with her brother Tom, and their various discussions on very profound questions, are very cleverly related and are quite amusing. Quite an attractive book for the young people. Prettily bound, and with a number of illustrations. Sq. i2mo, cloth, $1.25.

Life Of St. John, by M. L. Baunard. (Catholic Pub. Soc.) A doctrinal history of the life of the apostle St. John, written by a Roman Catholic. A very neatly gotten-up work in every particular. i2mo, cloth, $1.25.

Wild Hyacinth, by Mrs. Randolph. (J. B. Lippincott & Co.) Mrs. Randolph's" Gentianella" first introduced her to novel-readers this side of the water. Those who read that, and liked it, will like this ever so much better, as it is a novel of much more power, with a more cleverly worked out plot, and with characters of more marked individuality. The heroines are twin sisters, and Scottish born ; Christian is strong-minded and sensible, with what are called advanced views; "Wild Hyacinth" is beautiful and more womanly. Their destiny leads them into fashionable life, and they go through the stereotyped steps of flirting, loving, and marrying. i2mo, cloth, $1.75.

St. George And St. Michael, by George Macdonald. (J. B. Ford & Co.) Charles the First's troubles with his Parliament, and the dissensions between the Protestants and Catholics, form the background to this story. It has a charming heroine, " Dorothy Vaughan," who is as brave as she is beautiful, and who is steadfast to the end to the lover who espouses the opposite side. It is as interesting a novel as Mr. Macdonald has written, well conceived and skilfully worked out, and will no doubt obtain many readers. There is a very good portrait of the

author, and a number of illustrations, which are more than ordinarily fine. i2mo, cloth, $1.75.

The Bridal Eve, by Mrs. E. D. E. N. Southworth. (T. B. Peterson & Bros.) A vindictive'nurse, children changed in the cradle, a death-bed confession, the supposed heiress deserted by her mercenary^over, etc., etc., is an attempted summary of the first few pages. So many complications follow—deaths, poisoning, murders, marriages, and separations—that we give up further description in despair. Mrs. Southworth's name, however, should be sufficient recommendatien for the book to her admirers, as it shows no falling off in her'wonderful inventive genius, in the way of plot or incident. i2mo, cloth, $1.75.

Two Campaigns, by A. H. Engelbach. (Pott, Young & Co.) "A tale of old Alsace," told by an old campaigner to a young friend. He begins at the very beginning of his life, and graphically describes the battles he has fought, the disappointments he has met with, and the love that entered into his life. Illustrated, i6mo, cloth, $1.50.

The Young Surveyor, by J. T. Trowbridge. (James R. Osgood & Co.), The boys who have followed "Jack Hazard" through his varying fortunes, will be glad to meet him again, though it is far off on the prairies this time, where Jack pursues his profession as a surveyor, and has the usual amount of adventures befal him. Illustrated, i2mo, cloth, $1.50.

The Wages Of Sin, by Edmund Yates. (William F. Gill & Co ) Fashionable London life, with its crimes and follies, plays an important part in this novel. It is not very healthy in tone, though not devoid of interest. 8vo, paper, 50 cents.

Fred And Jeanie, by Jennie M. Drinkwater. (Robert Carter & Bros.) The story of two little children, and how they learned all about God. Good reading for children just beginning to get interested in books. i2mo, cloth, $1.25.

The Little Street-sweeper, by Rev. S. B. Halliday. (J. B. Ford & Co.) The sketches in this book are founded upon Mr. Halliday's own experience as a missionary in the Tombs and in the old Five Points. They give some heartrending views of life among the lowly. 121110, cloth, $1.25.

STATIONERY NOTES.

Chas. 'taber & Co., New-Bedford, Mass., have now ready for the trade their new cata logue of passepartouts, mats, frames, photographs, chromos, etc., all of their own manufacture. Their panel-flowers with black backgrounds are very popular, and make a fine display for a stationer's window. Their new panel chromos are some of the best upon the market.

Messrs. E. I. Horsman, 100 William street and 72 John street, offer the trade a large stock of games for the holiday trade. Besides their well-known games, they have added a number of novelties to their list, that can not fail to become popular. Their stock consists of all varieties of home amusements, such as table croquet, dominoes, checkers, chess-blocks, magic lanterns, puzzle blocks and pictures ; also a full line of West & Lee's games.

per, the binding, the printing, and the engravings by A. V. S. Anthony, under whose supervision the volume was prepared, are all in exquisite taste, and reflect the greatest credit upon the publishers. It seems superfluous to say that the volume will be one of the most soughtfor holiday books. Sq. 8vo, cloth, fully gilt, $5

The Catskill Fairies, by Virginia W. Johnson. (Harper & Bros.) Within these dainty covers is related the story of a little boy named Job, who, left alone by his grandfather one December evening, up in their little home on the Catskill mountains, is snowed in by a storm which comes up unexpectedly. Little Job is frightened and lonely, but tries at first to bear up bravely, but finally bursts into tears; then the old clock, which has ticked for years in the corner, and his pet Angora cat both find voices to console him. and beg him to wipe his eyes and listen to the stories they have to tell him. Thus one story after another is introduced, all tgld by familiar objects in the room ; then the fairies come trooping in from the enchanted regions around the Hudson, made memorable through the exploits of Rip Van Winkle. They relate the most fantastic stories, and charm little Job so completely that his grandfather returns and is heard making his way through the drift before he has realized at ail the lapse of time. The pretty conceits of the stories, the bright way in which they are told, and their odd humor and quaint mingling of fact and fancy, make the volume one of the loveliest specimens of a child's book one could imagine The charming illustrations by Alfred Fredericks must not be overlooked; they embellish every page, and render the stories doubly attractive. The binding and general get-up are very beautiful, and exceedingly dainty. 8vo, cloth, gilt edges, $3.

Home Pastorals, Ballads And Lyrics, by Bayard Taylor. (James R. Osgood & Co.) Bayard Taylor's reputation has been made more through his prose than his poetry; if, however, he had never written any prose, he would be known as one of our most favored poets. His verses are simple and pathetic, descriptive mostly of his own home life and surroundings, refined in sentiment, and elevated in tone. These are especially marked by their melody, and the grace and tenderness which pervade them; they can not fail to give great pleasure to his many friends. The volume also contains his " Gettysburg Ode," and verses on " Shakespeare's Statue" and "Goethe." i2mo, cloth, $2.

Little Classics, edited by Rossiter Johnson. Vol. 16, Authors. (James R. Osgood & Co.) The addition of this volume to this popular series is a capital idea It contains biographical sketches of all the authors represented in the series, and a general index of all the poems and prose, giving the author, volume, and page. It is an indispensable adjunct to the series, and will prove a most useful little book of reference. $1.

Ancient Pagan And Modern Christian Symbolism, by Thomas Inman, M.D. (J. W. Bouton.) This is a second edition of a valuable work, considerably enlarged and revised by Mr. John Newton, who also contributes an essay on Baal Worship, on the Assyrian sacred "Grove," and other allied symbols. The contents of the volume consist simply of plates

with descriptions No dissertation or argument is entered upon, the author confining himself to an explanation and analysis of ancient symbols, and their present use and form in modern Christian worship. The plates are taken from a larger work of the author's, "Ancient Faiths embodied in Ancient Names," where the whole subject is fully discussed. 8vo, cloth, $3.

Mr. Mackenzie's Answer, by Faye Huntington. (National Temperance Soc.) A story of fashionable American life, in which the subject of intemperance, of course, plays an important ! part. One of the most interesting stories of the kind we have read. i2mo, cloth, $1.25.

The Rapids Of Niagara, by the author of "The Wide, Wide World." (Robert Carter & Bros.) Mr. and Mrs. Candlish, Maggie, Meredith, and Uncle Eden, all returned from Jamaica, are again the prominent characters of this new volume of " The Little Camp on Eagle Hill" series. The "naughty boy" is personified by one Bolivar Dexter, who kills Maggie's dog, and almost loses his own life in the Rapids of Niagara. The illustrations of the Lord's Prayer are continued in it, the portion under examination being, "forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive those," etc. i2ino, cloth, $1.25.

The Big Brother, by George Cary Eggleslon. (G. P. Putnam's Sons.) Sam Hardwicke, ihe brave young hero of this story, lived on the frontier of Alabama, in the time of the Indian war in 1813. He and his brother and sisterand a young colored boy are cut off from a party who are endeavoring to take refuge in a stockade fort from some hostile Indians. The subsequent wanderings of Sam and his party, their hiding in the woods from the Indians, and their Robinson Crusoe-like existence for several months, till they are at last enabled to rejoin their parents, afford material for a very entertaining and instructive story. The book is nicely illustrated, and very well gotten up. Sq. i2mo, cloth, $1.50.

A Story Book For The Children, by Mrs. A. M. Diaz. (James R. Osgood & Co.) A perfect gold-mine of treasure in the shape of delightfully odd and original stories. Seme of them are well worth grown folks' reading, they are so quaint, and point a moral in such a perfectly ludicrous manner. The " Dream of the Little Girl who would not pick up Pins" and the " Dream of the Little Boy who would not Eat his Crusts" are both inimitable, and strike out into quite a new vein in story-telling. Indeed, all the stories show quite a remarkable degree of original talent. No little boy or girl should be without it. i2mo, cloth, $1.50.

Evangelists In The Church, by Rev. P. C. Headley. (Henry Hoyt.) Beginning with Philip of Samaria, who preached Christ's gospel thirtyfive years after his coming, Mr. Headley gives us a succinct history of the laborers in the Church, through every generation down to the present, which has witnessed the wonderful revivals brought about through the efforts of Messrs. Moody and Sankey. The lives of George Whitefield, John Wesley, Rev. C. G. Finney, Henry Varley, Mrs. E. P. Gurney, Ned Wright, and many others too numerous to mention, will be found here. Seventeen portraits also add to the interest of the volume. i2mo, cloth, $1.75.

Fvkry-day Religion, by T. De Witt Tal

mage. (Harper & Bros.) The fourth series of Mr. Talmage's sermons. Although the title of the work is the least sensational of any yet published, the sermons individually make up for any apparent lack of eccentricity. They are both in substance and name altogether out of the trodden paths of theology, and savor almost too much of out-door preaching to be the pleasantest reading to a cultivated mind. We have no doubt, however, of the good they have achieved and will achieve, and can therefore commend them to Mr. Talmage's many admirers as being fully up to his usual style of orator)'. We offer a few specimen titles, taken at random from the contents: "Snow-water and Alkali Insufficient," "The Religion of Ghosts," " Stripping the Slain," "The Crimson Coat," "The Red Cord in the Window," " Pillows Under the Arms," "The Superhuman Jesus," etc., etc. i2mo, cloth, $2.

Sunshine For Rainy Days. (American Tract Soc.) This is an edition in German of one of the prettiest juveniles the Tract Society publishes. Out of ninety-four pages, forty-seven are full-page pictures, with an opposite page of reading matter (in German, of course). The pictures are copies of very familiar and favorite studies, and just the kind to win a child's heart. We noticed the same book last year, in its English dress, as one of the cheapest and most attractive juveniles in the market. 410, cloth, $1.

Proud Little Dody, by Sarah E. Chester. (American Tract Soc.) A pretty story of a quaint, sunny little girl whose besetting sin is pride. Her plays with her brother Tom, and their various discussions on very profound questions, are very cleverly related and are quite amusing. Quite an attractive book for the young people. Prettily bound, and with a number of illustrations. Sq. 121110, cloth, $1.25.

Life Of St. John, by M. L. Baunard. (Catholic Pub. Soc.) A doctrinal history of the life of the apostle St. John, written by a Roman Catholic. A very neatly gotten-up work in every particular. i2mo, cloth, $1.25.

Wild Hyacinth, by Mrs. Randolph. (J. B. Lippincott & Co.) Mrs. Randolph's" Gentianella" first introduced her to novel-readers this side of the water. Tliose who read that, and liked it, will like this ever so much better, as it is a novel of much more power, with a more cleverly worked out plot, and with characters of more marked individuality. The heroines are twin sisters, and Scottish born; Christian is strong-minded and sensible, with what are called advanced views ;" Wild Hyacinth" is beautiful and more womanly. Their destiny leads them into fashionable life, and they go through the stereotyped steps of flirting, loving, and marrying. i2mo, cloth, $1.75.

St. George And St. Michael, by George Macdonald. (J. B. Ford & Co.) Charles the First's troubles with his Parliament, and the dissensions between the Protestants and Catholics, form the background to this story. It has a charming heroine, " Dorothy Vaughan," who is as brave as she is beautiful, and who is steadfast to the end to the lover who espouses the opposite side. It is as interesting a novel as Mr. Macdonald has written, well conceived and skilfully worked out, and will no doubt obtain many readers. There is a very good portrait of the

author, and a number of illustrations, which are more than ordinarily fine. i2mo, cloth, % 1.75.

The Bridal Eve, by Mrs. E. D. E. N. Southworth. (T. B. Peterson & Bros.) A vindictive'nurse, children changed in the cradle, a death-bed confession, the supposed heiress deserted by her mercenaryklover, etc., etc., is an attempted summary of the first few pages. So many complications follow—deaths, poisoning, murders, marriages, and separations—that we give up further description in despair. Mrs. Southworth's name, however, should be sufficient recommendatien for the book to her admirers, as it shows no falling off in her wonderful inventive genius, in the way of plot or incident. i2mo, cloth, $1.75.

Two Campaigns, by A. H. Engelbach. (Pott, Young & Co.) "A tale of old Alsace," told by an old campaigner to a young friend. He begins at the very beginning of his life, and graphically describes the battles he has fought, the disappointments he has met with, and the love that entered into his life. Illustrated, i6mo, cloth, $1.50.

The Young Surveyor, by J. T. Trowbridge. (James R. Osgood & Co.), The boys who have followed "Jack Hazard" through his varying fortunes, will be glad to meet him again, though it is far off on the prairies this time, where Jack pursues his profession as a surveyor, and has the usual amount of adventures befal him. Illustrated, i2mo, cloth. $1.50.

The Wages Of Sin, by Edmund Yates. (William F. Gill & Co ) Fashionable London life, with its crimes and follies, plays an important part in this novel. It is not very healthy in tone, though not devoid of interest. 8vo. paper, 50 cents.

Fred And Jeanie, by Jennie M. Drinkwater. (Robert Carter & Bros.) The story of two little children, and how they learned all about God. Good reading for children just beginning to get interested in books. i2mo, cloth, $1.25.

The Little Street-sweeper, by Rev. S. B. Halliday. (J. B. Ford & Co.) The sketches in this book are founded upon Mr. Halliday's own experience as a missionary in the Tombs and in the old Five Points. They give some heartrending views of life among the lowly. i2mo, cloth, $1.25.

STATIONERY NOTES.

Chas. 'taber & Co., New-Bedford, Mass., have now ready for the trade their new cata logue of passepartouts, mats, frames, photographs, chromos, etc., all of their own manufacture. Their panel-flowers with black backgrounds are very popular, and make a fine display for a stationer's window. Their new panel-chromos are some of the best upon the market.

Messrs. E. I. Horsman, 100 William street and 72 John street, offer the trade a large stock of games for the holiday trade. Besides their well-known games, they have added a number of novelties to their list, that can not fail to become popular. Their stock consists of all varieties of home amusements, such as table croquet, dominoes, checkers, chess-blocks, magic lanterns, puzzle blocks and pictures ; also a full line of West & Lee's games.

Burnet's wire lock, scrap, sample and invoice books continue to meet with a heavy sale, owing to the many advantages they possess over other goods of a similar character. The new scrap-book contains an index which renders it very valuable.

Messrs. L. Prang & Co., Boston, have ready for the holiday trade a number of new chromos. of which may be mentioned "April showers bring forth May flowers," "R. S. V. P.," "There's never smoke without fire," "One touch of nature makes the world kin." These are some of the finest pictures ever published by this popular house.

Messrs. Brower Bros., 293 and 295 Broadway, exhibited at the late Stationers' Fair a full line of their well-known Euroid Inkstand. These inkstands have been upon the market for some time, and have met with great success. Among its numerous advantages, it has a wide mouth, but as only a small surface of ink is exposed to the air, evaporation is checked. It is easily cleaned and filled. Several of the States have adopted the Euroid Inkstand for the use of their various departments. Messrs. Brower Bros, have also a full assortment of fancy glass and bronze inkstands, paperweights, cardholders, and calendars.

Mr. Robert Rutter, book-binder, Nos. 82 and 84 Beekman Street, New-York, has issued to his customers an elegant new business card. It is made of heavy card-board, covered with Turkey morocco, handsomely illuminated, and stamped in gilt.

we have to wait for an extra number of the PubLishers' Weekly to give the conclusion of his tale.—Ed.]

The Ancient Canvasser.

A Fragment.

From Patterson's " Book.Shelf."

It is an ancient canvasser—
And he stopp'eth one of three;

"By thy long red nose and unkempt hair,
Now wherefore stopp'st thou me?

The court-room doors are opened wide,

My case the next one on;
The jury's packed, the judge is bribed,

Wilt hear the case be won?"

He button-holes him then and there,

"There is a book," quoth he; "Avaunt! unhand me, red-nose loon!"

Eftsoon his hand dropt he.

He holds him with his glittering eye—

Th' attorney stood him still, He listens like a lawyer's clerk,

The canvasser hath his will.

The lawyer leaned against a pump,

Conveniently near,
And thus spake on that canvasser—

He could not choose but hear:

"' The Stadt Huys of Nieuw Amsterdam;'

Poems of wondrous power; 'The Mystery of the Newspaper,'

Disclosed in Reid's tall tower.

'Point Lace and Diamonds,' Baker's poems, Creating such sensation—

f—But as the ancient canvasser ran on for fourteen hours and twelve secondsby the clock,

Personal Mention.

We regret to state that Mr. William D. Bancker, manager of the New-York News Co., has resigned that position. It is to the regret also of all connected with the News Company, and it is pleasant to know that Mr. Bancker will not leave the trade altogether.

Mr. Chas. W. Rodgers, recently head of the retail department of Lee & Shepard, and who has an enviable reputation in that field, has arranged a business connection with Messrs. Lockwood, Brooks & Company, 381 Washington and 10 Bromfield streets, Boston, where he will be pleased to see his friends and business acquaintances.

Mr. Theo. L. De Vinne is happily and truly complimented in the dedication of the "Typographical Bibliography" to him, as one "who has made every printer a debtor to his erudition and practical knowledge of the art."

Mr. John Bartlett, the accomplished literary partner in the firm of Little, Brown & Co., of Boston, has issued a new edition of his wellknown volume of "Familiar Quotations,"a book we have done him the honor of twice reprinting, once with his name, and on the other occasion depriving him of all share of responsibility by taking his name from the title-page. Had our cousins over the water done this we should have been very hard upon them, and called them pirates. Mr. Bartlett, no doubt, felt differently, and thought that an honor had been conferred upon him. This edition has been much enlarged, but is not perfect; indeed, it never can be: each successive edition must necessarily be more complete than its predecessor.—London Bookseller.

Mr. W. F. Gii.l possesses the original MS. of Poe's poem of "The Bells." The handwriting is said to be very handsome and as clear as print.

Library and Bibliographical Notes

Bulletin No. 35 from the Boston Public Library contains an extra quantity of valuable bibliographical matter, including articles on "Waterloo and the Campaign of 1815 ;" " Newspapers," a very valuable bibliography, including magazine articles on journalism; "John Wesley," and "Architecture." This number completes the second volume of the Bulletins, and a title-page and index to the bibliographical notes will be issued. The series of notes on Centennial reading will be continued for 1776 in the next Bulletin.

The cataloguers of the Boston Public Library are now at work upon the Shakespearian portion of the Barton collection, and suggestions are asked from Shakespearian scholars.

Senor Juan F. Rino has been made purchasing agent of the Boston Public Library at Madrid, and additions will be made to the Ticknor collection at the suggestion of Spanish scholars.

The gelatine process of James R. Osgood & Co. is now used for preparing the public card catalogue of the Boston Library, the entries thus appearing in facsimile of the original entries of the library transcribers.

Mr. A. M. Ledeboer has lately published, in Dutch (Utrecht, J. L. Beyers, 4to), the first part of an alphabetical list of all the printers, booksellers, and publishers in Holland, from Coster to the beginning of the nineteenth century. It is a sequel to the book of the same author issued in 1873, 4to, under the title, "Boekdrukkers, boekvercoopers en uitgevers in Noord-Nederland," in which the same persons are entered according to the places they had lived in.

The " Catalogue of the Quincy (Mass.) Public Library" patterns closely after that of the Boston Library in style, method, and annotations, but in this latter particular it presents valuable new features. These are the definition of blind titles by an abbreviation, such as " Fict.," "Jur.," etc., the explanation of obscure titles by parenthetical notes, and like practical guidings. Mr. Charles Francis Adams, Jr., is understood to have had to do with its preparation. The librarian is Miss Mary J. Brooks, Quincy, Mass., and copies may be had of her at $1 in paper, or $1.35 in cloth, which is, we presume, cost price.

An Ambitious Author. The American reprint of Mr. Ruskin's works, which is the only edition approaching completeness, numbers thirty volumes, into some of which several minor works have been gathered by twos and threes. There are five series of which he is publishing instalments. But his imagination so far outruns his possible power that even this is only half what he hoped to have achieved. "The first number of his new serial," writes Mr. Welford to the Book-Buyer, "' Deucalion : Collected Studies of the Lapse of Waves and Life of Stones,' contains a most touching example of the vanity of human wishes and the fallacy of human hopes. It is a list given in sober earnest of the various designs projected as the complement of his lifework. And now, when the materials are all collected, and the ripened judgment is ready for application to them, at the age of fifty-six, he is warned by advancing years how utterly impossible it will be for him to carry out into execution his ideas, while the many-towered city he is not able to find fades into cloudland, and all he can do is to offer ' a few fragments of good marble' from the heap of loose stones collected for its foundations. The intended works were: 'A History of Fifteenth Century Florentine Art,' in six octavo volumes; 'An Analysis of the Attic Art of the Fifth Century B.C.,'in three volumes: 'An Exhaustive History of Northern Thirteenth Century Art,' in ten volumes; 'A Life of Turner, with Analysis of Modern Landscape Art,' in four volumes; 'A Life of Walter Scotl, with Analysis of Modern Epic Art,' in seven volumes; 'A Life of Xenophon, with Analysis of the General Principles of Education,' in ten volumes; 'A Commentary on Hesiod, with Final Analysis of the Principles of Political Economy,' in nine volumes; and 'A General Description of the Geology and Botany of the Alps,' in twenty-four volumes." The list seems almost laughable, but is doubtless meant in sad earnest indeed.

A Religious Publication Society.

It is noteworthy how much is often done quietly by agencies of which the general trade know comparatively little. It was certainly a surprise to most to see the Methodist Book Concern represented at the last Fair by a display of books larger than that of any house except Harper & Brothers'. It exhibited there about 2500 samples, and there were besides two libraries of 500 little volumes each not exhibited, besides other minor books. Counting its tracts, etc., the catalogue of this concern is the largest in the country. About twenty million copies of periodicals a year are also circulated from the house in New-York. The Berean Leaf of Sunday-school lessons circulates 1,200,000 monthly (although part of this circulation has recently been transferred to the Western Book Concern); The Sunday-School Journal, 100,000; the Picture Lesson Paper, 75,000; The SundaySchool Advocate, semi-monthly, 200,000; The Christian Advocate, weekly, 50,000. This is a remarkable showing. It is worth noting that the colporteur system has been almost altogether abandoned by the Church. In the early days of American publishing experience, following Wesley's system, each minister was furnished with a stated number of each new publication of the Concern, charged to him as on sale, and colporteurs were also employed at the outposts. Of late years, partly doubtless because of the progress of differentiation in occupation and an increased culture of their ministers, and partly because with the growth of the Church putting books on sale thus would absorb and waste vast capital, this method has been quite given up, and the Concern now seeks to sell its publications largely through the regular book trade.

LITERARY AND TRADE NEWS

The report of the Committee of the Book Trade on Centennial Representation, published in this issue, reaches us too late for editorial comment. It is to be noted, however, that the time for receiving applications has been now extended to the 15th inst., and as but two of the more prominent houses, we understand, have neglected to so apply, it is to behoped they will take advantage of this further grace"

The " Magazine for the German Book Trade" (Leipzig) for February—March, 1875, devoted a considerable article to a comparison of the German and foreign Christmas catalogues. In speaking of the Christmas Supplement of the Publishers' Weekly, it said: "In point of typographical taste as well as beauty and elegance of print and paper, the American catalogue is most brilliant. The Americans have lately given much attention to the art of bookmaking, and within the last two years they claim to have produced a number of printed works worthy to rank with the best French and English issues. And certainly some works have come under our notice which fully justify this claim. The present catalogue is another example of these efforts. The arrangement of the letterpress is perfect for the purpose of setting off the illustrations. Some of these are original designs of great merit. The editorial matter is likewise appropriate. Under the heading, 'What the Publishers have done

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