Specimens of English prose-writers, from the earliest times to the close of the 17th century, with sketches biogr. and literary, &c. By G. Burnett

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George Burnett
1807
 

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Página 155 - ... cometh to you with words set in delightful proportion, either accompanied with, or prepared for, the well enchanting skill of music ; and with a tale, forsooth, he cometh unto you, with a tale which holdeth children from play, and old men from the chimney corner ; and pretending no more, doth in?
Página 332 - ... as if there were sought in knowledge a couch whereupon to rest a searching and restless spirit, or a terrace for a wandering and variable mind to walk up and down with a fair prospect, or a tower of state for a proud mind to raise itself upon, or a fort or commanding ground for strife and contention, or a shop for profit and sale ; and not a rich store-house for the glory of the Creator and the relief of man's estate.
Página 482 - Equity is a roguish thing ; for law we have a measure, know what to trust to ; equity is according to the conscience of him that is Chancellor, and as that is larger or narrower, so is equity. 'Tis all one as if they should make the standard for the measure we call a foot...
Página 418 - In style, to consider what ought to be written and after what manner, he must first think and excogitate his matter, then choose his words and examine the weight of either, then take care in placing and ranking both matter and words, that the composition be comely, and to do this with diligence and often.
Página 335 - It were too long to go over the particular remedies which learning doth minister to all the diseases of the mind, sometimes purging the ill humours, sometimes opening the obstructions, sometimes helping digestion, sometimes increasing appetite, sometimes healing the wounds and exulcerations thereof, and the like ; and therefore I will conclude with that which hath rationem totius...
Página 151 - There were hills which garnished their proud heights with stately trees : humble valleys whose base estate seemed comforted with the refreshing of silver rivers ; meadows enamelled with all sorts of eye-pleasing flowers ; thickets, which being lined with most pleasant shade were witnessed so...
Página 336 - The good parts he hath he will learn to show to the full, and use them dexterously, but not much to increase them. The faults he hath he will learn how to hide and colour them, but not much to amend them ; like an ill mower, that mows on still, and never whets his scythe. Whereas with the learned man it fares otherwise, that he doth ever intermix the correction and amendment of his mind with the use and employment thereof.
Página 418 - For a man to — write well, there are required three necessaries — to read the best authors, observe the best speakers, and much exercise of his own style.
Página 55 - Some seek so far for outlandish English, that they forget altogether their mother's language. And I dare swear this, if some of their mothers were alive, they were not able to tell what they say...
Página 420 - For the mind and memory, are more sharply exercised in comprehending another man's things than our_own ; and such as accustom themselves, and are familiar with the best authors, shall ever and anon find somewhat of them in themselves, and in the expression of their minds, even when they feel it not, be able to utter something like theirs, which hath an authority above their own.

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