Biographia Navalis: Or, Impartial Memoirs of the Lives and Characters of Officers of the Navy of Great Britain, from the Year 1660 to the Present Time; Drawn from the Most Authentic Sources, and Disposed in a Chronological Arrangement, Volume 1

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R. Faulder, 1794

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Página 193 - There be, that tell me, that there is a certain cunning fellow in Scotland, called George Monk, who is said to lie in wait there to introduce Charles Stuart : I pray you use your diligence to apprehend him, and send him up to me.
Página 340 - ... of Buckinghamshire, a poet and wit of the seventeenth century, was born in 1649, and was the son of Edmund, earl of Mulgrave*. At nine years of age he lost his father, and his mother marrying again soon after, the care of his education was left entirely to the conduct of a tutor, who, though himself a man of learning; had not that happy manner of communicating his knowledge by which his pupil could reap any great improvement under him. In consequence of which, when he came to part from his governor,...
Página 54 - He was a man of wonderful parts in all kinds of learning, which he took more delight in than his title ; and having no great estate descended to him, he brought down his mind to his fortune, and lived very retired, but with more reputation than any fortune could The eari of have given him.
Página 390 - ... having obtained a commission in a Hussar regiment; he subsequently exchanged to the Carbineers, and in 1830 was appointed Major in the 5th Dragoon Guards. He became a colonel in the army in 1851 ; at the commencement of the Russian war, in 1854, was appointed to the command of a brigade of cavalry, and in the following year he was promoted to the command of the cavalry division. General Scarlett was among the foremost at Balaklava, and was wounded before Sebastopol, and for his services in the...
Página 40 - was fb incre>" dible, that all men, who knew the place, wondered ** that any fober man, with what courage foever cn" dued, would ever have undertaken it, and they could " hardly perfuade themfelves to believe what they had ** done : while the Spaniards comforted themfelves " with the belief, that they were devils and not men 4' who had deftroycd them in fuch a manner..
Página 36 - Whitehall, the next day, by the master of the said vessel, who, by Sir Charles Littleton's order, was sent to present his Majesty with the George found about the body of the said earl, which remained, at the time of its taking up, in every part unblemished, saving some impressions made by the fire upon his face and breast...
Página 352 - ... with that resolution, I cannot think it had any great effect upon them: and this I may affirm for a truth, not with any intention to value our own action, or to lessen the bravery of the enemy, that they were beaten by a number considerably less than theirs, the calmness and thickness of the weather giving very few of the Dutch or the blue the opportunity of engaging...
Página 36 - performances in this laft adt of his life, hath refolved to have «* his body brought up to London, there at his charge to receive *' the rites of funeral, due to his great quality and merits. *« His body * being taken out of one of his...
Página 204 - Trump, in a tremendous battle, which lasted three days. The duke had scarcely returned into port before he was called to London, in consequence of the dreadful fire which laid the greatest part of the capital In ashes; and so dear was he to the people, that when he passed along, they cried out, 'If his Grace had been there the city would not have been burned.
Página 340 - SHEFFIELD (JOHN), duke of Buckinghamshire, a poet and wit of the seventeenth century, was born in 1649, and was the son of Edmund, earl of Mulgrave*. At nine years of age he lost his father, and his mother marrying again soon after, the care of his education was left entirely to the conduct of a tutor, who, though himself a man of learning; had not that happy manner of communicating his knowledge by which his pupil could reap any great improvement under him. In consequence of which, when he came...

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